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Full text of "73 Magazine (July 1982)"

July 1982 $2.95 
Issue #262 













I 



Salute to CW! 

8 Articles 




Positive Ions: 
Invisible Menace? 

Page 52 




Field Day Afloat 

Page 12 





'74470' 





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• 5 memories. Store your favorite fre- 
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• Priorit}^ channel. Monitor your most 
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• 25 watts high/1 w^att battery saving 
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• Memory back up power supply option 
holds memory when attached. 



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INFO 



Manuscripts 

Contrfbulion^ Ifi the form of manu- 
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Entire contents copyright 1982, Wayr^e 
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permission from the publtsher. Mtcfo- 
nim Edition— Uniwersay Micfofiilm. 
Ann Artffif m 40106, 



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4 73Magazine « JulyJ9&2 



Log of the Colorado Queen 

—wet, wild Field Day fun K3PUR 12 



CB to CW? 

—converting the Hy-Cain board 



W1BG 



18 




juf/ 82 

MAGAZINE 



Vol XXII Na to 



Electric Health via Negative Ions 

— combatting an invisible menace 

W(JOCX 52 



« ! I 



The Very, Very Best CW Filter? 

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WB4TYU AC5G 56 



The True-Blue Keyer 

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72 



96 



Never Say Die-6, Social Events-72, RTTY Loop-BB, Ham Help-92, 116, New Products-104, Reader 
Service-114, Corrections-121, Fun! -122, Contests- 124, DX-126, Awards- 127, Letters- 130, 
Review — 133, Satellites— 137, Dealer Directory — 162, Propagation— 162 

Ck^ver Ptioto by F. Dale Williams K3PUR, Littletori CO. 



73 Magazine • July J 982 5 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

editorial by Wayne Green 




DAYTON 82 

ft isnl jysl the ffea market 
with over 5O0 small enirapre- 
neurs seiling out of their trucks, 
campers, and cars. It isn't the 
nearly 200 exhibitors inside the 
rambling Wamplers arena. It 
isn*t the 25,000 or so hams and 
their famines which descend 
upon Dayton in April every year. 
Pandemonium, 

Whenever I hear atHDut some 
hamfest or a computer show 
polHng 20.QO0t (think of what It 
takes to handle the crowds at 
Dayton and how many people 
this really is ati in one area. The 
fields are packed with cars for a 
half mile or so around the arena 
area. The cavernous arena build- 
ings are packed with people. No 
matter how many there are In- 
side, it seems as If the flea mar- 
ket area outside Is still so busy 
that il is difficult to get around. 

Dayton attracts average 
hams from several nearby 
states, But more than that, most 
of the real "movers" of the hob- 
by. , Jhe hams who are doing 
the building, the inventing, the 
pjoneering, . .come from every- 
where In the country. These are 



the hams who make amateur ra- 
dio the incredible hobby that it 
is. 

Other hamfests may have 
technical sessions, but these 
are attended by merely interest- 
ed amateurs. At Dayton, the at- 
tendance of these tech sessions 
Is made up of the hams who are 
domg things. Here, one gets to 
say hello to the top DXers, the 
DXpeditioners, the siow-scan 
three*dimensional color experi- 
menters, the packet switching 
fanatics, and the spread-spec- 
trum aficionados. 

While several of the other 
larger hamfests have gone to 
rather great lengths to bring in 
computer-oriented exhibitors. 
Dayton has maintained a 
straight ham approach which 
has kept this field of ham activi- 
ty at a relatively low profile. Yet 
this year, when we counted the 
exhibits, we found that about 
15% of them were computer-^ori* 
ented. This is low, of coyrse* 
compared to the computer inter- 
est in the ham world. Our most 
recent survey of the 73 reader- 
ship showed that the ownership 
of microcomputers is up to 39% 



VOLUNTEERS NEEDED 

How woufd you like to be on the "instde" of a major ama- 
teur radio contest? Here's your chance* 

WeVre looking for volunteers to become members ot the 73 
Magazine Contest Committee- Anyone with an I nterest m con- 
testing and a willingness to work hard is welcome. Committee 
members will help with the following: 

1, Contest rules and ethics. 

2. Forms and correspondence. 

3. Log checking and scoring, 

4, Filling out and mailing awards. 

Heading up the Contest Committee is Bifl KE7C. Please 
drop Bill a note (with BASE) and let him know where you can 
help. Write to Bill Gosney KE7C, ?3 Contest Committee, 2665 
North Busby Road. Oak Harbor WA 98277, 

We want you on the 73 Contest Teamt 



now. In another year perhaps 
50% of the readers will have mi- 
crocomputers. 

I tried to give a talk during the 
hamfest, but the meeting 
*'room'' was so terribJe that I 
gave up. The temperature was 
well into the sleep zone and the 
noise was such that someone 
three feet away had trouble 
hearing what was going on. The 
area was just one part of a huge 
building, with deafening noise 
coming from aU sides. I don't 
think I'll try that agaia 1*11 bet n 
was 90* or more in the room, 
with only enough seats for 
about 70% of those who came 
to hear me. 

My talks are generally rather 
low key. with some time re- 
quired for the humor to come 
through, i do speak about seri- 
ous things, but I don't take many 
of them seriously. And I don1 do 
well when I have to communi- 
cate by yelling at people. 

111 no doubt continue to go to 
Dayton, but only to say hello, 
find out what's new; and get to- 
gether with my friends in the in- 
dustry. 

HARRY, WHERE 4 RE YOU? 

Missing for the first time in 
years at Dayton was the flushed 
cherubic face of Harry Dannals, 
I for one, am sorry to see good 
old Harry go. And I have to admit 
that I was darned upset when I 
learned that the ARRL board 
just plain outright dumped him. 
Now what would it have cost 
them to be nice about it and give 
him a President Emeritus posi- 
lion? 

Dick Baldwin, also not visible 
at Dayton, seems to have fallen 
in the same black hole now oc- 
cupied by Harry, but at least 
with a face-saving title to make 
it look batter. That's what they 
did with John Huntoon when the 



power pofjtics at HQ dumped 
him a few years ago Anyone re- 
member John? 

You know, one of the sur* 
prises I got when I went around 
to visit some weaftlny hams back 
in 1960 had to do with Dick Bald- 
win. I'd been fired by CO as edi- 
tor and had this crazy idea of 
starting my own ham magazine. 
I was hoping to find a ham with 
enough money to get a new 
magazine started. One chap I 
visited said he thought the idea 
was a good one but thai it was 
too dependent upon just one 
person; me. He was right about 
that, of course. He also men* 
tioned that Dick had been 
around with a similar proposi* 
tion a few days before. 

I dropped Dick a note asking if 
he might t>e interested In a joint 
venture. He wrote back saying 
no. Well, I went ahead without 
any financing and Dick never 
did. Oh, Ft was nip and tuck for 
several years, particularly when 
the ham business fell to pieces 
after the 1963 ARRL proposal for 
changing the licensing struc- 
ture back to the 1930s form. 
That's when we lost 85% of the 
sales of ham gear in jusl one 
year and all of the major manu- 
facturers were forced out of the 
industry. 

The ten years after that of no 
growth were hard ones for me 
and 73. It wasn't until I managed 
to sell the idea of FM and repeat- 
ers that the industry (and /3) 
turned around. 

Harry, who had retired from 
hfs job at Sperry in order to be 
available for the General Man- 
ager's position, may have to un- 
retire. I wonder what went wrong 
for him? Tm told by the ARRL In* 
siders that he performed the 
most exhaustive campaign for 
the job In history. , .at League 
expense. Perhaps it was his bit* 
ter opposition to having a wom- 
an on the board. Well, no matter 
, , . Harry is well out of the rat 
race and the demands of the 
ARRL presidency. I was worried 
that the even greater pressures 
of being General Manager might 
be too much for him. Perhaps he 
can relax now and add at least 
twenty years to his life. This may 
be the best thing that has hap- 
pened to Harry in years. . .in- 
stead of the disaster which It 
first appears. 

IKSTANT LICENSES 

At long last a solution to the 
code exam has been effected. 
Now it is no longer necessary 



6 73Magaime- • July, 1982 



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Hancl3^ for checking signals on the input 
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STAFF 



PUeUSHEFUEOITOn 
Wayne Ofsen W2NSD>rl 

EXECUTtVE VJCE PH 6 Si DENT 

ASSISTANT f^ueusHER/EOtron 

J«f t O^Ttay WB6BTH 

MANAQING EDITOR 
John BiimQU 

ASST MANAGINd EDITOR 
Susan FhilbNc^li 

EOrrORlAL ASSISTANTS 
Nancy MayO 

S(e«« JewMI 

TECHNICAL EOrrOR 
Tim 0«nt«l H8RK 

AiSiSTANT 

TO THE PRESIDENT 

MatrhDW SmJiti KAIiEl 

ASSOCIATES 

Robpfl Bakijr WB2CFE 

John Edwards KI2U 

Qill G0»rt«y KE7C 

S«rtiO«f Gr^^n 

Chod W*jris VR2ML 

Df Mofc Iflavev WA^A^R 

J. H Itelton 

B4II P»ternah WAfilTF 

Pelei Smrk K20AW 




pROoucTiON manager; 

PUaLlCATIONS 
Nancy SalttKin 

ASST PflOOUCTlON 

M A N AG ER/Py B LLC AT IONS 

M(C!I«I Murphy 

ADVEHTfStNG GRAPHICS 

MANAGERS 

Sl94«6aid>iivm 

Bruce HeHjin 

Jane Preston 

PflODLfCTfOW 

Frani^fis BRnlon 

8«tl¥ Buller 

Fkjni Davies 

Lindi Or«« 

Sv^fa Dukette 

Dtn^ Oyef 

Diftfifift RiTson 

TTitfeiii Ostabo 

Scolt PtllltHfiCk 

Wary Seav#F 
D^DOiah Stone 

kene Vail 
Jucfl Wimljerly' 
OavLd WoJFmilc 

PW0TO<5PAP«¥ 

Jnohn R Scttiireijl&rt 

RotKft M. ViE^n^y^ 

Thomai Vdteneywe 

TVPfsrmwG 

Sara Beimel i 
Melody B-Bde1l 

Mario Barker 

□ebb It DEJVidson 

Mtctfcltt Oes roc hers 

Jfinniil«r F^y 
Anf^a flocctiio 
Ellen Scttw^Tl 
Kvem Stewart 

tiU Stciner 

GENERAL MANAGER 
O&Dfd Boudn&au 

CONTROLLER 
flogflr Murphy 

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 
L<^aince O'NesI 

ACCOUNTING MANAGER 

CIRCULATIOII MAHAGiR 
Ratricu FerranEe 

CIRCULATION 

Doris Day 

603S249471 

Pauline Jonnslone 

SULK SALES MANAGER 
G^nni« Boudr4e:au 

ADVERTISING 

Jim Gray Vf :XU, Mgr 

Nancy Ciampa. As^i Mgr 

Ross K«nyan KA1GAV 

CointHia Taylor 



I 






for anyone to bother to learn 
even one single characier of Ihe 
Morse code to get a ham li- 
cense. The solution to the code 
problem is so simple Tm 
amazed that no one ever 
though! of It before. Once you 
get the concept, you see that we 
no longer have to argue about 
the code* 

At Dayton someone was sell- 
ing a cassette with the FCC 
code test on it. With today's 
miniature cassette recorders it 
(s a snap to have one In your 
pocket and record the tests as 
they are being given. Well, 
someone did this and was self- 
Ing the tapes at Dayton. Once 
you have that all you have to do 
is get someone to translate it for 
you, memorize the short text, 
and present yourself for the test. 

The FCC is so underpowered 
these days that they really don't 
have the personnel to devise a 
lot of different tests. I'll bet that 
at best they have maybe two for 
Morse code, if that many- There 
are no indications that the Com- 
mission is going to get more 
money from Congress^ so it is 
unlikely that there will be much 
doing in the way of changes. 

So, by the time you put the 
Bash books together wHh a cas* 
sette of the code testi you have 
a ham license that anyone who 
can read and write can get. No 
more is there a need for that te* 
Uious learning of the code. No 
more struggling with theory or 
the rules. Bash gives you the an^ 
swers to the written exam and 
the code cassette solves that 
problem. 

Who wilt be the first Extra to 
get licensed with no ham knowl- 
edge whatever? Or perhaps I 
should ask, who was the first? 

As a humorous side note: the 
FCC recently was handed a 
code test exam which was 
100% perfect. WeH» perttaps a/- 
most perfect. You see the an- 
swers were perfect for the other 
lest. . . not the one given. 



WE NEED KIDS 

With all due respect to Bash 
and his one-day blitz cram 
courses, at S175 for one day It is 
unlikely that we are going to get 
many kids into the hobby via 
this mercenary system. 

Now, I have the greatest ad- 
miration (or Bash and his bid to 
outdo Don Miller In making 
money out of amateur radio. Vm 
sure he will find no shortage of 
well-to-do hams who want to get 
a higher license without having 



FCC DELETES 97.71 AND 97.74 

"Unenforceable, burdensome and unnecessary" is how the 
FCC described 97,74, a rule requiring amateurs "to provide for 
measuring the station's emitted carrier frequency and to es- 
tablish procedures for independently checking ii regularly." 
In their April 1 meeting, the commissioners voted to delete 
97.74 and 97.71, a rule which required transmitters operating 
below 144 MHz to have adequately-filtered plate power sup- 
plies. In deleting 97.71, the Commission said **the rule itself is 
inappropriate and outmoded/' 



to team one bit of theory. Just 
ten of his weekend sessions a 
year should net him around 
$150,000. One really has to ad- 
mire that, no matter what the 
consequences to the hobby. 

His system is simple and it 
works. He sits you down for a 
full day of memorizing the 
answers to the questions. He 
has you write down the answers 
you are going to need the follow* 
ing day on the exam . . . write 
'em two or three times to make 
sure they are well-established in 
your short-term memory. As an 
aspiring General or Advanced, 
you can't lose. Neither can Bash. 

All this has absolutely noth- 
ing to do with the major crisis in 
amateur radio: the need for new 
hams. Novices, . .teenagers. 
We already have all of the old 
men we need in amateur radio- 
now what we need is to see 
about 100,000 new Novices per 
year to get our rusty old hobby 
jumping again. That would spur 
technicaf developments and 
building (kids really love to 
build) and get some life into 
things. 

What has your club don© to 
get a ham group started in the 



local high school? If we don't 

even give the kids a chance to be 
exposed to amateur radio, we 
have no gripe when Ihey turn to 
drugs, drinking, getting into car 
accidents, malicious destruc- 
tion, spray painting everything 
in sight, and getting all of your 
girls pregnant. At least give 
them an alternative! 

NAVASSA TIME 

The May 3rd issue of Time 
had a nice article on the recent 
hamming of Navassa Island. As 
one of the few persistent 
(stupid) enough to go there 
twice, I read the item with more 
than average interest. 

The first trip, In 195B 
{KC4AF. . .a call now held by a 
chap in Alabama), saw six of us 
chartering a motor-sarler in 
Nassau and making our way 
down the Bahamas to Haiti 
through a heavy storm. We just 
barely missed crashing on a reef 
when we got to Haiti before 
dawn. It was a hell of a trip and 
we found ourselves about 50 
miles off course by the time we 

Continued on page 1 tS 



Western Electric 

MONTGOMERY WORKS 



AMATEUR RADIO CLUB 
AURORA. lU^LNOIS 

e0&07 




'^ICCdTWP OM nm MMtKS OF Tm «C*W?#WL /Wf #ATCT 



QSL OF THE MONTH; WA9DNZ 

The natural theme of the Western Electric Montgomery Works 
club station comes from the plant's location on the Fox River. Built 
on the site of a former amusement park, the factory is In a wooded 
setting and sports a year-round duck population. The card's bright 
colors are sure to catch the eye of the operator on the other end. 



8 73 Magazine • July, 1982 





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• Full Passband Tuning (PBT) enhances use of high rejection 
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Newl Both 2.3 kHz ssb and 500 Kz cw crystal filters, and 9 
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New! The very effective NB7 Noise Blanker Is now standard. 

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R7A Receiver 

• CONTINUOUS NO COMPROMISE to 30 MHz 
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Newt Standard ultimate selectivity choices include the 
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with the R7A's Synchro-Phase a-m detector, provides 
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narrower bandwidth than conventional a-m detection, 
and sideband selection to minimise interference potential 

• Front panel pushbutton cxintro! of rf preamp, a-m /ssb 
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ins" System 

appropriate use of the TR7A's RCT control (Receiver 
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« ALTERNATE ANTENNA CAPABILITY. The R7A's Antenna 
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SpeoflcatiDns. avaii^bUrty and prices subject to change wfttiout notice or ob4igation- 

yotir Drake dealer or wrfte 
for additional information. 




COMING SOOfw New RV75 Synttiestod VFO 
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• fksojution to 10 Hi • Tbree programTfiibie fixed 
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Features, availability ami pnces subject to cftan^ge without notice or obiigation. 

540 Richard St. , Mismfsburg, OhiG 45342. USA 
Phone; 1513) B66-24P1 • Telex: 2aB'01 7 




Log of the Colorado Queen 

wet, wild Field Day fun 



F, Dale wntkm^ KJPUR 
5592 5. Moore Street 
Uitieton CO 80127 



Spring, as reflected in 
the short-lived green 
sheen of the foothills, was 
well settled in the Rocky 
Mountains when the menn- 
bers of a Denver area ama- 
teur radio club gathered to 
discuss the 1978 Field Day 
activities. The interests of 
the club had varied over the 
years, but the recent in- 
creased appeal of contest- 
ing and the technical anten- 
na expertise promised tn the 



form of a full-size 40-meter 
beam to help fill in the prop- 
agation holes in 10-20 me- 
ters convinced the member- 
ship to go all out for top 
spot in the Field Day results. 
Without debating the 
good and bad points of Field 
Day. suffice it to say that 
participation can be divided 
into two broad classifica- 
tions—high key and low 
key. Those groups scoring 
high obviously are in the 
high-key category which de- 
scribes the organization, 
planning, and pressure re- 
quired. The pursuit of a hob- 
by is supposed to be fun and 
the belief that a sense of 



personal accomplishment 
could be achieved without 
the peer pressures for maxi- 
mum contacts led to the 
breakaway, following the 
1978 Field Day activities, of 
five members of the club 
who subsequently formed 
"the crew." 

When the crew, consist- 
ing of Al NaAUS, Pete 
N6EBC (ex-WD<JBm Gary 
WDOGGL, Cten WDl^FEO, 
and Dave WB8KYP, meets, 
they have only two goals: 
having fun and planning 
technical projects which 
some people say can't be 
done. It was this attitude 
that prevailed at the first 




The crew and the Colorado Queen preparing to begin the weekend operations. 
12 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



meeting of the group where 
plans were formed to con- 
struct a floating all-band sta- 
tion. Once the concept was 
agreed upon, it became ob- 
vious that this vessel would 
require a name befitting its 
heritage. Since NIJAUS had a 
thing for the African Queen, 
having seen the movie more 
times than he could remenv 
ber, it wasn't long before the 
group came up with some 
apropos phonetics and a 
name: CQ, the Colorado 
Queen. 

During the winter, plans 
for a 1979 summer launch- 
ing were made with reckless 
abandon and much beer. 
Chatf ield Reservoir, south of 
Denver, at an elevation of 
5432 feet was chosen as the 
site of operations and 
WDOFEO offered the use of 
his Ifrman white-water rub- 
ber raft as the ship of desti- 
ny. As might be expected, 
the selection of a suitable 
antenna and how to mount 
it to a rubber raft were the 
biggest problems. The final 
solution involved a 14AVQ 
all-band vertical, owned by 
WDQFEO. and a floating 
platform. A hollow steel 
pipe and flange were at- 
tached to the center of a 
large diameter circular sec- 
tion of plywood through 
which a hole had been 
drilled in the center Three 
900 X 16 truck inner tubes 
were mounted under the 
platform to provide flota- 
tion and stability; three out- 
riggers, emanating from the 




WBdKVP readies the {riband beam for a little more height 



platforni and made from 2 x 
4 X 12s, supplied guy points 
for the vertical which was 

attached to the pipe. A long 
cable connected to and ex- 
tending through the center 
of the pipe into the water 
served as system ground. 
Support framework for the 
equipment and personal 
gear was ably constructed 
through the experience of 
WP0FEO and the crew's la- 
bor. 

Now consider, for a mo- 
ment, a 14-foot rubber raft 
powered by a 3,5-horsepow- 

er motor towing the antenna 
platform just described wjth 
the vertical via a 30foot 
rope, While underway, the 
floating antenna platform 
maintains its distance, but 
when the raft is stationary, 
the weight of the rope and 
coax connecting the rig on 
the raft to the antenna tend 
to draw the platform closer 
as the cable sinks into the 
water A number of four- 
inch styrofoam balls, with a 
hole cut through the center 



for the coax, solved this 
problem and prepared the 
Queen for her August 18th 

inaugural voyage. 

With a Yaesu FT-101EE 
powered by two paralleled 
fead-acid batteries, various 
2-meter hand-he Ids, assort- 
ed swr meters, and other 
gear on board and an appro- 
priate christening with white 
lightning, the historical 
launching of the first mile- 
high freshwater mobile took 
place amidst the curious 
gazes of swimmers, boaters, 
and sunbathers. During the 
weekend of operation, 
many contacts were made, 
lots of time was spent rag- 
chewing as opposed to ex- 
changing callsign, signal 
strength, contest number 
and best wishes, and most 
important of all, a fun time 
was had by all, including 
WB8KYP who towed a 
stranded cabin cruiser back 
to shore with his "shuttle ca- 
noe" and paddle power. The 
only casualties, other than 
operator sunburn, on this 




The backup Kenwood, unloaded by WDOFEO. provided 
flawless operation. 



first voyage were a water- 
logged 2-meter hand-held 
and damp finals in the FT- 
101EE. 

It is a well-known fact 
that the higher the antenna, 
the better the communica- 
tions. Therefore, Green 
Mountain Reservoir, at an 
elevation of 8200 feet, was 
chosen by the crew for the 
1980 launching of the Cota- 
rado Queen, Besides that, 
WDOFEO offered the use of 
the family cabin for a week- 
end of revelry. The same ba- 
sic raft and antenna plat- 
form were used w^ith some 
extra framing and plywood 
floor added to the raft for ri- 
gidity and the addition of 
equipment boxes to pre- 
clude some of the water 



problems encountered the 
previous year. 

After a successful launch- 
ing and an uneventful morn- 
ing of operation, the crew 
was languishing on the deck, 
contemplating the relative 
merits of Coors beer, better 
known as Colorado Kool- 
Aid, when the capricious 
mountain weather made 
one of its abrupt changes. In 
less time than it takes to 
QRX, the sun disappeared 
and 70-mile-per-hour winds 
whipped the surface of the 
water into a rough pattern 
of whitecaps. Since the clos- 
est land was in the form of 
an island, the crew cranked 
up the 3.5 pony-power en- 
gine and headed the Queen 
for the leeward side The 

73Mag3Zine • July. 1982 13 



bamboo mast supporting 
WDOFEOs 2-meter beam 
split with a resounding crack 

and the antenna was fished 
out of the drink by means of 
the still attached coax. 

When the island was fi- 
nally reached, everyone dis- 
embarked to attempt to find 
some shelter. It was a short 
time later when it was dis- 
covered that no one had 
dropped anchor or tied up 
the raft, which was now 
making good time away 
from the island. Luckily, the 
shuttle canoe was still on 
the shore and the chase be- 
gan. In the ensuing recovery: 
to add insult to injury^ 
WDaFEO's ten-gallon hat 
was blown into the water 
where it promptly sank be- 
neath the wavjBS. Repeated 
efforts to recover this well- 
worn relic were all in vain, 
although WB8KYP swears 
he saw a catfish wearing 
something similar as it 
jumped in front of the raft. 

No sooner was the raft se- 
cured back at the island 
than some crew members 
decided that the original 
cargo of three cases of beer 
was fast being depleted and 
some suntan lotion to 
soothe the morning's ultra- 
violet onslaught was in or- 
der. What is it they say 
about discretion being the 
better part of valor? Any- 
way, WDOGGL and 
WB8KYP volunteered to 
take the canoe and attempt 
to refurbish the supplies. In 
an adventure about which 
the residents along the 
shoreline still chuckle, these 
two stalwarts paddled and 
bailed their way to the far 
shore, in the only vessel on 
the water, oblivious to the 
binocular-equipped audi- 
ence watching from the 
many windows on land. Re- 
portedly, the trip back to the 
island after obtaining the 
necessary replenishments 
was much easier with the 
wind at the rear Sunday 
dawned bright and clear, 
providing a fine atmosphere 
for the conclusion of that 
year's freshwater operation 
with only a Yaesu 2-meter 

14 73 Magazine • Ju1yJ932 



rig sustaining water damage 
and WB8KYP once again 
coming to the rescue of a 

stranded cabin cruiser, but 
this time he was prepared (?] 
with a l.Z-horsepower Nep- 
tune engine mounted on his 
shuttle canoe. 

By 1981, the crew was 
looking for bigger and better 
challenges to conquer with 
the Colorado Queen and 
had made the operation an 
annual event taking place 
the weekend following the 
July 4th holidays. Commen- 
surate with the arrival of 
spring, the crew, minus 
N6E BC who had been trans- 
ferred to California, gath- 
ered to begin construction 
of the latest version of the 
Colorado Queen 

Over the winter months a 
new design for the antenna 
platform had evolved, made 
necessary by the decision to 
use WB8KYP^s TH-3]r. tri^ 
band beam. WDQFEO had 



managed to find a sma 
boat dock which had four 
SCKgallon drums attached 
underneath for flotation and 
steel-rimmed wheels mount- 
ed on the sides for easy wa- 
ter entry and exit. Six 900 x 
16 truck inner tubes were 
added for stability and two 2 
X 4s for attaching the float- 
ing dock to the framework 
of the raft Three holes 
drilled at the center of the 
dock allowed the mounting 
of a steel tower section 
which was guyed to the four 
corners of the dock super- 
structure. The mast was 
then slipped through the 
tower pipe and the triband 
beam mounted on top. 
Enough mast was used to al- 
low the antenna to be raised 
between six and fifteen feet 
and still offer the capability 
of arm strong rotation. 

The first test of this water 
mobile antenna barge al- 
most drowned two of the 




WDQCGL relaxes as the sun tries to burn off the early morr}- 
ing mountain mist 



crew due to its top-heavy at- 
titude. Subsequently, an ex- 
ercise With a local firm's 
Computer Aided Design 
equipment showed that a 
180-pound counterweight 
suspended nine feet below 
the water line would stabil- 
ize the platform Oh, the 
wonders of modern technol- 
ogy. The counterweight was 
constructed and made ad- 
justable so that it could be 
raised when approaching 
the shore or lowered to 14 
feet for windy conditions. 

As the weekend of |uly 
11-12 drew closer, construc- 
tion activity intensified. 
Boxes to hold the lead-acid 
batteries were built, a brack- 
et assembly to provide 
mounting of the 14AVQ to 
the raft frame for 40- and 
80-meter operation was 
completed, and white paint 
flowed fretily. 

By the time launch day 
1981 arrived, the crew had 
put in at least 480 man hours 
in labor alone. The arrival in 
Denver of N6EBC a few days 
prior to the weekend sig- 
nalled the imminent pack- 
up and departure of the 
crew for the mountains. As- 
sembly of all the miscellane- 
ous parts, all prepared and 
marked beforehand, took 
about two hours on Friday. 

Meanwhile, N6EBC had 
brought along some Santa 
Maria beans from California 
which he put in a borrowed 
enamel pot, then adding 
some "miscellaneous condi- 
ments" before placing them 
on the gas-modified wood- 
stove to cook. I have been 
known to prepare some 
pretty bad-looking vittles, 
but 1 have never seen any- 
thing eat the enamel off the 
inside of the pot like those 
beans did. Thank goodness 
the sirloin roasts with the se- 
cret flavoring, barbecued 
over an open oak fire, were 
really good. 

Bright and early Saturday 
morning, the rigs and equip- 
ment were loaded into the 
raft and hooked up and the 
third annual launching of 
the Colorado Queen be- 
came history — or so it was 



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supposed to be. Output 
power from the Yaesu FT- 
101 B was almost nil and the 
LEDs on the front of the 
I com 2''meter rig would not 
even glimmer. Power con- 
nections were checked and 
rigs exchanged without suc- 
cess. Finally someone got 
the bright idea of measuring 
the voltage of the batteries. 
Eureka, a brand new heavy- 
duty battery had a shorted 
cell and was pulling the par- 
allel battery combination 
down to about 8.5 volts. The 
extra drain on the good bat- 
tery limited current capacity 
for the day*s operation, even 
after the bad battery was re- 
placed. 

Late Saturday afternoon 
some clouds moved in and 
the wind picked up. causing 
a slightly earlier than usual 
beaching of the Queen for 
the first day A Kenwood 
TS-520S was put in service 
Sunday morning but the skip 
was not too long, with most 
of the QSOs originating out 
of the eighth call area 




from the operating position, N6EBC and NQAUS divide their 
activities between testing 807s and logging contacts. 



Shortly before noon on Sun- 
day, the clouds and wind re- 
turned from the opposite di- 
rection and the smell of 
ozone m the atmosphere ir>* 
dicated a high level of static 
electricity. As WDffFEO 
guided the floating station 
into the dock, the static 
build-up became so bad that 
a humming and discharge 
clicking were clearly audi- 



ble, but the antennas were 
grounded and the equip- 
ment was removed without 
incident. Despite these tech- 
nical problems, poor band 
conditions, high wakes from 
power boats pulling water 
skiers (which made the tri- 
band elements flap through 
a three-foot arc), and the 
many visitors that WB8KYP 
shuttled back and forth in 



his canoe, the two days of 
freshwater mobile opera- 
tion, gourmet food, and 14 
cases of beer made for an 
unsurpassed weekend of 
camaraderie and enjoy- 
ment. 

What will the crew do for 
an encore? Well, plans are 
already underway for the 
construction of a motorized 
dock large enough tor the 
TH-3)r. at 30 feet, the 
14AVQ vertical, a 2-meter 
mast and five-eighths 
groundplane, a gasolme 
generator, a Model 35 Tele- 
type, three operating posi- 
tions, and many creature 
comforts. When not in use, 
the dock will serve its nor- 
mal purpose. 

If you didn't manage to 
get your call letters entered 
into the log of the Colorado 
Queen for 1981, you mjssed 
the opportunity of receiving 
a fine 8 x 10 color picture 
QSL card. Mark your calen- 
dar now for July 10-11, 1982 
— the crew will be listening 
for you. ■ 



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25A Bridge Rectifier 

Over 60,000 mfd of filters 

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reduce a heatsink area 

Schematics and service guide included 

Thermal Shutdown 

Statis LED's (3) 



16 73 Magazine • July J 982 



SELECT YOUR 
FAVORITE FEATURE 



ConHtHMlie. 



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CT71W 



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Yes, the CT2100 has the features you want - and built-in, too! The CT2100 has been designed 
by the RTTY people at HAL for optimuin operator convenience. No *'hidden" keyboard con- 
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• Send or receive ASCII, Baudot, or Morse code 

• RTTY and Morse demodulators are built-in 

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ASCII or Baudot 

• Four RTTY modems: **high tones'', *1ow tones", 
"103 Modem tones", and **202 Modem tones" 

• Three shifts for high and low tones (170, 425, and 850 Hz) 

• Crystal -synthesized transmit tones 

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• Characters displayed on 24 line screen 

• Choose either 36 or 72 characters per line 

• 2 pages 01 72 character tines or 4 pages of 36 character lines 

• Split-screen for pre typing transmit text 

• Audio^ current loop, or RS232 data I/O 

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• On-screen RTTY tuning bar plus LED indicators 

• ALL ASCII control characters; half or full duplex 

• Brag-tape storage of 8*256 character messages in 
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Write or call for more details. See the CT2100, KB2100, Printer, and Video Monitor at yoLir 
favorite HAL dealer, 



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t^S&s List Of Advertisers on page T M 



73MBgazine • July, 1982 17 



CB to CW? 

converting the Hy-Gain board 



Photos by W1QSL 




Operator's view of the transceiver. Note the insulating wa&hers around the key and phone jacks. The internal dc power 

ground is floated from the cabinet to permit use of an externa/ supp/y of either polarity. Front panel is 7" X 4'\ 

18 73MagBzlnB • July, 1982 



Penn Chwer W1 BC 
459 Lowell Street 
Andov^ MA 01810 



BEFOftE WODIFICATIDM 



AFTER WOEHFlCATIOtll 

9* 



If yoy're one of the thou- 
sands of hams who 
bought one of those Hy- 
Cain CB set printed circuit 
boards for a song when they 
appeared on the surplus 
market, then this may be 
the article you've been 
waiting for. Described here 
is a neat little ten-meter 
CW rig that boasts a feature 
you won't get in the stan- 
dard HF transceiver: fult 
break*in The rig is built 
around the Hy-Gain board 
and is inexpensive to dupli* 
cate. You don't have to buy 
any new crystals or exotic 
ICs; in fact, the design 
philosophy has been to add 
nothing which couldn't be 
found at the local Radio 
Shack outlet. If your junk 
box contains a few old tran* 
sistor radios and a twelve- 
volt power source, you 
shouldn't have to buy any- 
thing at alL 

Before getting into the 
actual conversion steps, 
let's review what we have 
and where we're taking it. 
The circuit boards on the 
surplus market were des- 
tined to go into a whole 
family of Hy-Cain sets 
(models 2679, 2680, 2681, 
and 2683, at least). The re- 
ceiver is a dual-conversion 
superhet with i-fs at 10.7 
and ,455 MHz. The trans- 
mitter is AM with an output 
between 3 5 and 6 Watts de- 
pending on individual tran- 
sistor characteristics and 
the supply voltage. The 
heart of the frequency-de- 
termining scheme is a PLL- 
02A phase-locked loop 
chip, and it is possible to 
put the rig on ten meters by 
rearranging the wiring of 
the channel selector switch 
and modifying some of the 
other loop components. 
The theory behind the 



means of changing the fre- 
quency coverage is de- 
scribed in my earlier article 
(' CB to 10/' 73 Magazine. 
September, 1980) in more 
detail than I will go into 
here. I strongly suggest that 
you get and study that ear- 
lier article along with a cir- 
cuit diagram of the board 
(I use the Sams Photofact 
folder covering the Hy-Gain 
model 2679A) before you 
start this project. The modi- 
fications aren't difficult, 
but ! won't repeat here 
large sections of the earlier 
article. The modifications 
described here are given in 
three stages- First, the basic 
conversion to CW on ten 
meters: the frequency 
change, the bfo, fine tuning, 
and putting the transmitter 
on CW. Second are some 
convenience features: side- 
tone oscillator detector 
modifications, rf/i-f gain 
control, transmitter fre- 
quency offset ^nd an ac- 
tive audio filter. The final 
stage is the modification to 
give full break-in. There are 
a lot of circuit changes in- 
volved in the complete con- 
version and I strongly sug* 
gest that you make and try 
them out one at a time. 
Troubleshooting a problem 
can be fairly easy when you 
know that it must be due to 
those last five wires you 



*Sl3 ¥0UTS 



iti 



m 



,001 



TO 0105 
EH IT TEH 



24 pF 



* r 


-\ 


t 


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IC \t 




15 




t4 




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TQ CHflMNEL 
SWITCH 



PLL 



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10 

II 

IS 

14 



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CONTACT 
THAT USED 

TO CONNECT 
TO Plh 7 



THESE CONNECTIONS 
UNCHAN&tO 



?\g. 1. Channel selector modification. 







CMFMCfrQff 



Fig. 2. Modifications to increase bandwidth of low-pass 
filter. 



moved; A lot more time and 
test equipment will be 
needed if the set is silent 
and the cause could lurk in 
any of a half dozen modi- 
fied areas. There are a lot of 
circuit changes involved in 
the complete conversion 
but most can be made and 
tested a few at a time, 

A complete ''road map'' 
of the conversion is shown 
in Fig. 16 where a block dia- 
gram of the transceiver 
shows how the various 
steps fit into the big picture. 
For a starting point, it is as- 
sumed that your board is 
checked out and working as 
designed on 11 meters. 

Several last precautions 
are in order before getting 
down to circuit details. Hy- 
Gain made a lot of these 
boards in many different 



varieties. Many have open 
areas on the circuit board 
which when filled with 
components add features 
like the i-f noise blanker. 
Don't worry too much 
about the missing com- 
ponents, but if you are 
given a choice, take the 
board with the most parts in 
it. 

There are two different 
audio amplifier ICs in the 
sets I have seen: the pin-out 
and circuit are different, so 
you should watch out for 
that. Some boards were 
made to have the channel 
switch solder directly to the 
board, while others had 
posts for wire leads — this is 
a minor matter, but some- 
thing you may have to al- 
low for. 

There is one crucial dlf- 



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10 TURNS 
60pF 
%'TUFIN LINK 



MCIDEFIED ^* TUftNS 

CAPAClTOFT A? NQT^O 
l-TUHN LiHK 



Fig. 3 Tripler schematic diagram. 



73 Magazine * July, 1982 19 




Interior view. Note the tripler board and the active filter 
board mounted upright from the main circuit board. A ho 

shown is the method of mounting the speaker inside the top 
cover. 



f erence between the boards 
present! V available — the 
PLL IC sometimes has 16 
leads and sometimes has 
18. The 16-pin packages 
may have one of several 
type numbers, but all are 
similar to the PLL-02A and 
can be converted as de- 
scribed in this [and the ear* 
lier) article. The 18-pin PLL 
IG is a dead end. These 
boards were destined to go 
in the Hy-Gain 16, a uPcon- 



trolled trunk mount model 
with a fancy calculator-like 
microphone/control unit 
The PC card communicated 
with that unit via a serial 
data bus controlled in part 
by extra circuits inside the 
18-pin PLL IC. Those boards 
cannot be converted as de- 
scribed here. If yo'J have 
one of those boards, your 
best bet is to get the mi- 
crophone and interface 
card that go with the main 



Hlf- 



^^ S€pf 



iff 



.OOi 




Q\0^ 



— wwv- 



Ja4 



m 



Z.Vfi, 



S,3»c 



fn 



COMfiCCT TO OiOft EUtlTTER 




TMO 

BOTTOM 
vtEW 



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board and put it on 10 by 
changing the 11. 806-MHz 
crystal 

Stage One — The Basic CW 
Conversion 

The first and biggest step 
in modifying the rig is get- 
ting the operating frequen- 
cy to ten meters. The con- 
version of the phase-locked 
loop requires three main 
steps: changing the pro- 
gramming of the loop divid- 
er, increasing the passband 
of the low-pass filter follow- 
ing the loop mixer, and add- 
ing a frequency tripler be- 
tween the 11 .806-MHz crys- 
tal oscillator and the loop 
mixer* Changing the loop 
frequency programming is 
the easiest step of the three. 
The PLL-02A chip contains 
a nine-stage binary divider 
which, along with the 
10-kHz reference derived 
from the 10.240-MHz oscil- 
lator, sets the loop oper- 
ating frequency. The di- 
vider is switched by chang- 
ing the dc levels on pins 7 
through 15. A logic one (5 
volts) on a particular pin 
will enable the division con- 
trolled by that pin. All nine 
control pins are manip- 
ulated by the channel 
switch so that for channel 1 
the overall division is 224 
while on channel 40 the di- 
vision is 268. The plan is to 
change this switch coding 
and therefore the operating 
frequency. 

For example, note that 
since channel 1 is on 26.965 
MHz and the steps are 10 
kHz apart, we could move 
channel 1 to 28.005 MHz if 



DtODE DIOS 

R€MOVECi. S + 

HAROWIHEO TC 

TRAMSWirtEH ^ , ^ ^^ 

rO TRANSM^TT£ft 

OUTPUT STAGES 



liv 




HEAOPrtOKES 



THE5 P0kNt NOV 6H0gM& 
|ltSTEAp0f la VOLTS 



SPEflKES GROWaO WIWE 



fig. 4. The bio, QW% is sup- 
plied power constantly from 
Q106 instead of only during 
transmit 

20 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



f^TTyRliS TO TRANSFQ19MER 



^ 



SȣAK&R 



Fig. 5. Changes to audio output stage. The modulator is 
disabled by the removal of D105 and the speaker circuit is 
now operated at ground potential. 



we could change the divisor 
code to correspond to 328 
on that channel instead of 
224, Unfortunately, we 
can't make completelv ar- 
bitrary changes in the divi- 
sor size because we are 
stuck with the channel 
switch and the code built 
into it However, it is pos- 
sible to reroute the con- 
nections between the 
switch and the PLL chip so 
that channel 1 moves up 
960 kHz to 27.925 MHz, 
This means that channel 8 
will then fall on 28.01 5 MHz 

and channel 40 on 28J65 
MHz. The bulk of ten-meter 
CW activity takes place in 
the lower 200 kHz of the 
band, so the seven lower 
channels won't really be 
missed. 

Now for the actual wiring 
changes. The schematic of 
the change is shown in Fig, 
1. First cut apart pins 8, 9, 
and 10 of the tC on the cir- 
cuit board foil Pin 7 is dis- 
connected from the chan- 
nel switch and connected 
to + 5 volts at pin 1 , and the 
same is done for pin 9. Pin 8 
is grounded and pin 10 is 
connected to the switch ter- 
minal that used to go to pin 
7. That's all there is to the 
channel selector modifica- 
tion. 

The frequencies for the 
new channels are given in 
Table 1 along with the ap- 
propriate phase-locked 
loop coding The logic 1 lev- 
el corresponds to 5 volts, 
while the is ground, and 
you will want to run down 
the IC pins with a voltmeter 
to verify that the correct 
code for a particular chan- 
nel actually shows up. 
There are several types of 
40-channel switches sold 
for use with this board and 
it is easy to get confused 
about where the 5 volts 
goes in and the various IC 
pin connections come out- 
Notice that the 10-meter 
channels, like the CB chan- 
nels, are 10 kHz apart but 
that some frequencies are 
skipped and others are out 
of order. Be careful of the 




•llil^ 



THE LEADER IN 
COMMUNICATIONS 



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20 Meter Band -13.8-16,0 MHz 
15 Meter Band -20.8-23.0 MHz 
10 Meter Band -28,0-30,0 MHz^t 

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ffli 



band edges, particularly if 
you're a Novice and espe- 
cially after the fine-tuning 
modification ts added. 

The next step is to 
change the passband of the 
low-pass filter between the 
loop mixer, Q102, and the 
mixer buffer, Q103. This 
modification is necessary 
because the highest fre- 
quencY passing through this 
filter is now 3.64 MHz in- 
stead of 2,68 MHz. The cir- 
cuit changes, shown in Fig 
2 are straightforward. CI 08 
and CI 09 are reduced from 
330 to 130 pF, about one- 
third of the turns are re- 
moved from LI 01, and the 
inductor is paralleled by a 
24-pF capacitor These 
changes are fairly non-criti- 
cal; the set described in the 
earlier article used 180-pF 
capacitors, half the turns on 
LI 01, and 82 pF in parallel 
with the coil. The values 
shown in Fig. 2 work fine, 
but if you have some capac- 
itors that are slightly larger, 
don't be afraid to try them. 

The final and probably 
most complex change is the 
addition of the tripler fol- 
lowing the 11.80£^-MHz os- 
cilfator. The mixer input ts 
really looking for the third 
harmonic of that frequen- 
cy, but the Hy-Gain design- 
ers were able to save a 
stage by letting the mixer 
do the frequency multipli- 
cation as well as the mixing 
function. That trick doesn't 
work as well for us because 
the loop operating frequen- 
cies are shifted enough that 
some of the spurious mixer 
products cause trouble. As 
explained in the previous 
article, these spurious prod- 
ucts can actually prevent 
lock on frequencies higher 
in the ten-meter band. The 
CW end of the band is close 
enough to the CB frequen- 
cies that the loop will lock 
Without the tripler addition, 
but I found that the fine- 
tuning modification (de- 
scribed later) would not 
function property. The fre- 
quency would shift all right 
but over a portion of the 



shift range an unwanted 
beat note would appear in 
the mixer output. This beat 
would cause FM on both 
the transmitted and re- 
ceived signals. The tripler 
completely cured the prob- 
lem, but you may elect to 
first get the loop running 
without that added compli- 
cation as an easy means of 
verifying the other PLL 
modifications By all means 
do add the tripler before 
getting on the air, or be pre- 
pared to get a lot of reports 
of hum on your signal [and 
don't be footed, as 1 was at 
first, by looking at your out- 
put envelope and seeing no 
modulation — it sounds like 
AM hum, but being FM 
won't show on a scope. 

The tripler schematic 
shown in Fig, 3 is simpler 
than the one described in 
the first article, but works 
just as welL A single stage 
multiplies the ir806-MHz 
signal and two lightly 
coupled tuned circuits se- 
lect out the 35.4-MHz sig- 
nal. The tuned circuits used 
in this version are 10 J-MHz 
i-f transformers modified by 
the removal of half the 
turns on the core and re- 
placement of the 55-pF 
stock capacitors with 20-pF 
units. Some experimenta- 
tion may be necessary to 
get the circuits resonant at 
35 MHz, and a good grid- 
dip meter is an invaluable 
aid. There are other tech- 
niques which would work 
well. For example, if you're 
really well equipped, you 
could use a variable fre- 
quency signal source and a 
high bandwidth oscillo- 
scope. Of course, you can 
use any other type of tuned 
circuit— whatever the junk 
box has as long as it fits into 
the space available. 

As shown in the photo- 
graphs, I built the circuit on 
a small scrap of printed cir- 
cuit board and supported it 
by the stiff leads used to 
supply power and signals to 
the board. This isn't the 
most mechanically rugged 
technique, but it is neat and 



PLL Pin Levels 
Channel Frequency 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 S 7 



1 


27,925 



























2 


27.935 


1 
























3 


27.945 





1 





















4 


27.965 








1 


















5 


27.975 


1 





1 


















6 


27.985 





1 


1 


















7 


27.995 


1 


1 


1 


















e above channels 


not in the 10-meter amateur ba 


nd 


8 


20.015 


1 























9 


28025 





1 




















10 


28,035 


1 


1 















D 




11 


28.045 








1 

















12 


28.065 





1 


1 

















13 


28.075 


1 


1 


1 

















14 


28.085 


























15 


28.095 


1 























16 


28.115* 


1 


1 










Q 









17 


28.125* 








1 

















18 


28.135* 


1 





1 







Q 









19 


28.145' 





1 


1 

















20 


2ai65' 

























21 


^.175* 


1 






















22 


28.185* 





1 



















23 


^.215 


1 





1 
















24 


28.195* 


1 


1 



















25 


28.205 








1 
















26 


28.225 





1 


1 
















27 


28.235 


1 


1 


1 
















28 


28.245 


























^ 


28.255 


1 























30 


28.265 





1 




















31 


28.275 


1 


1 




















32 


28.285 








1 

















33 


28.295 


1 





1 

















34 


28.305 





1 


1 

















35 


28.315 


1 


1 


1 

















36 


28.325 

























37 


28.336 


1 






















38 


28.345 





1 



















39 


28.355 


1 


1 



















40 


28,365 








1 

















•These frequencies are in the Novice segment- 
All frequencies given are nominal and may vary ±5 
kHz or so if you include the fine-tuning modification. 



Table 1. New channel frequencies and PLL codling. 



with careful placennent of 
the support leads is strong 
enough to be reliable. I rein- 
forced the wires where they 
entered the main circuit 
board with a small drop of 
epoxy cement so that the 
stress would not be on the 
thin circuit foil below the 
board. 

Once these circuit modi- 
fications are made, the loop 
can be adjusted for proper 
operation. Monitor the dc 
voltage on the positive side 
of C1 15 and adjust the vco 



slug (Tl 01) so that the volt- 
age varies from a low of 
around a volt on channel 1 
to a high of about two volts 
on channel 40. The voltage 
should change slightly each 
time the channel switch is 
advanced. This voltage is a 
measure of the driving 
force necessary to pull the 
vco from its free-running 
frequency (set by TlOl) to 
the frequency requested by 
the channel selector; in 
fact a meter inserted at this 
point could be calibrated to 



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73 Magazine • July, 1982 23 




•8.5 VOuT& 
f 



Fig, 6. Cifcuk modification 

to allow transmitter keying 
at the tfansmitter mixer, 
QUO. 



read the ten-meter oper- 
ating frequency. 

Knowing this, you can 
easily determine if the 
phase-locked loop is run- 
ning normally. If, for exam- 
ple, you can switch chan- 
nels without changing the 
voltage at C1 15, then the 
vco frequency hasn't 
moved as it should and 
something is wrong. If the 
voltage seems to hop 
around in great leaps as you 
rotate the channel selector, 
then the channel switch is 
probably wired up to the 
PLL incorrectly. 









/S f 



T 



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DtOOE 




Fig. 7, Fine tuning with a varicap diode. 



Another good means of 
testing for proper operation 
is to listen to the output of 
the loop mixer with a re- 
ceiver. Remember that on 
channel 1 the loop divider 
is set to 320 and that on 
channel 40 it is set to 364, 
That means that the output 
of the mixer buffer, Q103, 
will be at 3.200 MHz on 
channel 1 and 3 640 MHz 
on channel 40. Accordingly, 
when the channel is set to 
36, the output of Q103 
should be on 3 600 MHz, 
and that can be easily veri- 
fied by connecting one end 
of a length of wire to the an- 
tenna terminal of an 80-me- 
ter receiver and wrapping 
the other end (insulated, 
with no direct electrical 
connection) around Q103. 
You can figure out which 
channel position corres- 
ponds to 36 by counting 
backwards from channel 



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Fig. 9. Sidetone oscillator circuit 



40; that channel you can 
find by watching for the 
large voltage change across 
C1 15 as the loop jumps from 
channel 40 to channel 1 . 

As an aside, it's interest- 
ing to note that the rig can 
now be used as a crystal- 
controlled calibrator which 
can be walked in precise 
lO-kHz steps across the bot* 
torn portion of 80 meters. 
The 3,600-MHz output on 
channel 36 can be zero beat 
with your crystal calibrator 
by adjusting the 10.240- 
MHz oscillator; then the 
PLL signals will be just as 
accurate on any of its chan- 
nels as your calibrator is at 
3.6 MHz. 

With the PLL modifica- 
tions complete and operat- 
ing, the set should operate 
as an AM rig (into a dummy 
only]) from 27.925 to 28 365 
MHz. By peaking up the re- 
ceiver front end (T104 and 
T105) and connecting ar\ 
antenna, you should be 
able to hear some CW sig- 
nals, though without a bfo 
you won't be able to copy 
them. The transmitter can 
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load by adjusting LI 03, 
LI 02, T102/ T103, LI 06, 
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erything up on 28.115 MHz 
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in 100 kHz of that frequen- 
cy. 

The remaining steps iii 
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are the bfo addition, the 
AM to CW transmitter 
change, and the provision 
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were covered in detail in 
the first article so will only 
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The bfo is actually the 
10.695-MHz transmit car- 
rier oscillator, Q109, which 
can be turned on during re- 
ceive by connecting the 
supply end of the 3.3k emit- 
ter resistor (Rn9) so that it 
gets 8.5 volts all the time in- 



24 73 Magazine * July, 1962 



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73 Magazine • JulyJ982 25 



stead of only when the rig is 
transmitting. The emitter of 
Q106 (the 8.5-vo[t voltage 
regulator) is a convenient 
source for this voltage. The 
circuit change is shown in 
Fig, 4. 

Putting the transmitter 
on CW is almost as simple. 
First the modulator output 
is disconnected from the 
transmitter driver and final 
amplifier by the removal of 
diode D105 [located just 
behind the audio trans- 
former) The transmitter 
stages are then powered by 
wiring the 12-volt line 
directly to what used to be 
the cathode end of the 
diode. The final and driver 
are class C amplifiers so 
they won't draw any cur^ 
rent until driven and there is 
no need to switch this 
power line. It is prudent to 
keep a load on the audio 
power stage at all times, 
but at this point there is no 
load during transmit be- 
cause the modulator func* 
tion is disconnected. The 
microphone push-to-talk 
switch normally opens the 
speaker circuit during 
transmit and that should be 
rewired so that the lower 
end of the speaker is con- 
nected to ground at all 
times. The output trans- 
former is also rewired so 
that the speaker circuit 
does not operate with a 
12-volt bias. This step helps 
reduce speaker thumps 
caused by the 12-volt sup- 
ply dropping when the 
transmitter is keyed. These 
modifications to the 
transmitter are shown In 
Fig. 5. 

Finally, some provision 
must be made for keying 
the transmitter, and that is 
done by keying the B+ line 
feeding the transmit mixer 
as shown in Fig. 6. The RC 
filter added in series with 
the power lead softens the 
rise and fall times enough 
to give brisk but clickless 
keying. 

The fine-tuning modifica- 
tion is shown in Fig. 7. The 
11,806-MHz heterodyne os- 




Back inside view. Note rear panel BNC for rf, miniature jack for external speaker DPS 7 
switch and male jack for external dc supply, and ac fuse for internal supply. 



citlator is tuned over about 
a 4-kH2 range with a vari* 
cap diode, thus giving after 
frequency multiplication a 
12-kHz shift in operating 
frequency. If your junk box 
doesn't have any varicap di- 
odes, you could substitute 
a 35-to-55-pF trimmer ca- 
pacitor, but the diode is a 
neater method. Not all tun- 
ing diodes are the same and 
you may have to try several 
or put several in parallel in 
order to get the required 
frequency change, Notice 
that as the oscillator is 
moved around in frequen- 
cy, the phase-locked loop 
will force the vco to move 
in step so that the output 
signal of the loop mixer 
[Q103) will not change in 
frequency. 

At this stage of develop- 
ment the rig is ready to go 
on the air. Keep in mind 
that the zero-beat frequen- 
cy is the transmit frequency 



and people will have a ten- 
dency to move in that direc- 
tion. Once you realize that 
is happening, you can ask 
the other fellow to stay a 
kHz offset from your trans- 
mitting frequency, or you 
can simply move the fine- 
tuning knob a bit when you 
start to receive. That's a 
nuisance, but not really a 
big problem when you get 
used to it. 

Stage Two — Some 
Convenience Features 

There are a lot of fea- 
tures which can be added 
to the basic transceiver to 
increase operating conve- 
nience. The most appreciat- 
ed will probably be a means 
of automaticaify offsetting 
the transmitter's frequency 
from the receiver's and the 
sidetone oscillator. The 
receiver performance can 
be increased considerably 
by removing the age circuit- 



ry, which is now responding 
to the bfo instead of the 
other station anyway, and 
controlling the rf and i-f 
gains from a front-panel po- 
tentiometer. There are 
some changes which can be 
made to increase the sensi- 
tivity of the detector— 
mainly the removal of the 
noise limiter. Last but not 
least is the addition of an 
active audio filter to give 
the receiver some much 
needed selectivity. 

The way to offset the car- 
rier oscillator is shown in 
Fig. B. If you examine the 
printed circuit foil closely, 
youil find that this same 
technique was destined to 
be used on the 10.24-MHz 
oscillator as a receiver off- 
set option. Somehow it 
seems more natural to 
move the transmitted fre- 
quency without affecting 
the receiver. Depending on 
the characteristics of in- 



2& 73M^gaitne • July, 1982 



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Write for our free Amateur catalog. 



'322 




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IN CANADA Canadian La f sen itecfronfcs. Ltd. 

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KQlma^ b a regbtefed frodemdr^ at Lorseri EFe<:lfonlct, Inc. In lUA orvd Cono^a 
iSiNKf* fs Q fe^;lifef&d tRKfemoit of Icsmvk Etedronlca Inc *i USA, and C(vx>da 




^S^ Lm of AdverUs^rs oo fiage tT4 



73t^agazine * July, 1982 27 




Bottom view. Power supply module in place. Rectangular object behind the transformer is 
the magnetic shield described in the text Power supply connecting wires are left long 
enough to allow the module to be moved for circuit board servicing. Note that the cut-out 
portion of the chassis top allows for dc isolation of the PC board ground. 



dividual crystals, there may 
be some changes required 
in the sizes of the 56, 39, 
and 20-pF capacitors. Those 
values with my crystal gave 
a ±700-H2 offset. The cir- 
cuit shown is designed to be 
mated with voltages avail- 
able from the break-in se- 
quencing circuits described 
later, If you are going to use 
a mechanical switch for the 
transmit-receive change- 



over, then the circuit of Fig. 
&(b) is an easy means of get- 
ting the two controlling 
voltages. 

The circuit for the side- 
tone oscillator is shown in 
Fig. 9. There is nothing spe* 
cial about this circuit but it 
does use few parts and 
draws only about 3 mA of 
current. The tone can be ad- 
justed by changing the size 
of the 220k resistor if 



desired. The oscillator gen- 
erates a sawtooth which is a 

bit harsh-sounding, so a 
low-pass filter comprised of 
a 1 meg resistor, the .OOl-uF 
capacitor, and the 270k 
resistor is used to smooth 
out the waveform. There is 
nothing critical about any 
of these components or the 
transistors used and value 
changes of as much as 30% 
will probably go unnoticed. 



Several changes were 
made to the detector cir- 
cuitry to make it more suit- 
able for CW use. The "be- 
fore" and "after" schemat- 
ics are shown in Fig. 10. Two 
changes are clearly needed: 
The S-meter and age are 
removed because they now 
respond to the bfo signal in- 
stead of incoming Morse 
signals. This was particular- 
ly troublesome since the 
age insisted on keeping the 
receiver gain low, and so 
the first change is to control 
the age line with a front- 
panel 25k pot. (I had hoped 
that this control wouldn't 
be necessary and that the 
receiver could be set for 
maximum gain, but it turns 
out that strong signals on 
nearby frequencies, i,e,, 
local CBers and worse, can 
cross-modulate the front 
end and show up in the 
audio output. This is proba- 
bly due to using the 
10.695-MHz bfo as much as 
poor front-end design. In 
the future, I want to try ad- 
ding a proper 455-kHz bfo, 
but for now I can signif- 
icantly reduce the problem 
by using the if gain control 
and switching when neces- 
sary to a horizontal dipole. 
Most CB operation is with 
vertical antennas, so the 
local operators are at- 
tenuated by 3 or 4 S-units 
when a horizontal antenna 
is usedj 

Also removed from the 
detector circuit is the noise 



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28 7$ Magazine • July. 1982 



Fig, 10(bl Detector circuit after modifkation. 



limiter consisting of RISS, 
R156. CI 76, and D108. 
These components are in a 
rather clever arrangement 
which clips both low-level 
fuzz and high-level spikes. 
Interestingly, the circuit on 
the board is always wired 
up and operating and it was 
onfy the models which had 
the provision for turning the 
circuit off (by putting a 
switch in place of the 
jumper J106) that adver- 
tised the feature! 

The squelch Is also re- 
moved, but the squelch 
transistor, Q120, is rewired 
as an emitter-follower buf- 
fering the audio output sig- 
nal. There are two reasons 
for this addition. It was 
found in the breadboard 
stage that the original vol- 
ume control setup, a 50k 
pot from CI 77 to ground, 
was susceptible to picking 
up hum as I probed around 
the circuit board with a 
finger. The use of an emit- 
ter-follower makes it possi- 
ble to have all of the wires 
leaving the board be low- 
impedance lines, while at 
the same time the high-im- 
pedance portions of the cir- 
cuit are kept physically 
small, which means that 
hum is much less of a prob- 
lem The emitter-folfower is 
also a good interface be- 
tween the detector and the 
active audio filter. As can 
be seen in Figs T1(a) and 
1 0(b), the same B + decou- 
pling circuit is used to 
power the active filter and 
emitter- follower. There is a 
lot of audio gain after these 
circuits and a well-filtered 
voltage source is a must to 
prevent audio oscillations- 

The audio filter design is 
straight from Solid State 
Design for the Radio 
Amateur (an ARRL publica- 
tion). A peaked low-pass 
characteristic was chosen 
because of its high attenua- 
tion above the cutoff fre- 
quency. Two sections are 
used, each with a Q near 5 
and a cutoff frequency of 
about 800 Hz; the overall 



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Fig. 11(a}. Circuit diagram for active filter. 



frequency response is 
shown in Fig, 11(b). The two 
op amps are operated be- 
tween ground and the 
12-volt supply, with the in- 
put signal being biased at 6 
volts by the emitter- 
follower. This arrangement 
saves the several resistors 
which would otherwise be 
necessary to derive the bias 
voltage. The output of the 
filter is fed to the volume 
control through a 15k resis- 
tor, thus providing some at- 
tenuation to compensate 
for the peaking above unity 
gain which occurs at the 
cutoff frequency. 

The 15k value was 
chosen so that the speaker 
level of an 800- Hz tone is 
approximately the same 
either with or without the 
filter being used. The 
resistor also serves the pur* 
pose of providing a high- 
output impedance for the 
filter — when the filter is 
switched "out/' what ac- 
tually happens is that the 
low-impedance output of 
the emitter-follower at- 
tenuates the filter output 
into insignificance. The 
audio from the volume con- 
trol is fed into the IC audio 
amplifier as indicated in 
Figs. 9 and 11 The filter is 
quite a help when the band 
gets crowded, often making 
otherwise impossible con-^ 
tacts easy copy. With the 
filter switched out it is easy 
to quickly scan the band us- 
ing only the channel switch 
since even signals several 
kHz from bfo zero beat can 
then be copied. 



The rf voltmeter shown 
in the photographs was in- 
troduced simply by insert- 
ing parts into the proper 
holes on the circuit board. 
This was another feature 
not wired until the last 
stages of manufacture. The 
only departure I made from 
the Hy-Cain layout is the 
replacement of the variable 
resistor tRvl04) on the cir- 
cuit board) with a fixed 15k 
unit That gives about half 
scale on my meter, a -5-mA 
unit with five Watts of out- 
put. You can change this as 
necessary to fit the meter 
you choose. The circuit, 
shown in Fig. 12, has alO-uF 
capacitor to filter the rec- 
tified waveshape so that 
the pointer won't slam back 
and forth with keying. 

Stage Three — Full Break-in 

Full break-in CW opera- 
tion is something that few 
newer hams have experi- 
enced, principally because 
many amateur transceivers 
are designed with sideband 
in mind and CW added as a 
"tack-on/' With full break- 
in it is possible to hear the 
other fellow sending when- 
ever your key is up, even in 
the middle of a letter. When 
the stations at both ends of 
a QSO have breakin capa- 
bility, the conversation is 




IKHt 



ZitHt 



yiCHl 



4KMt 



Fig. n(b). Measured perfor- 
mance of fitter, 

very much more natural 
than the usual segmented 
contact. Break-in is also a 
good operating feature: It's 
much easier to make and 
continue QSOs under dif- 
ficult conditions when you 
can hear what's going on 
during your transmission. 

The big problem with get- 
ting a transceiver to oper- 
ate full break-in success- 
fully is the elimination of 
clicks and thumps in the re- 
ceiver as the rig is switched 
rapidly between transmit- 
ting and receiving. Many 
things must occur in an 
ordered sequence as the rig 
is keyed. When the key is 
closed, the receiver must be 
biased off —the rf amplifier 
must be disabled, the age 
turned down, perhaps an i-f 
stage muted as welL Any 
frequency offset in the vfo 
must be done before the 



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Fig. 12. Rf voltmeter added by putf/ng parts into the ap- 
propriate positions on the PC board. 

73 Magazine • July, 1982 29 




The power supply module removed horn the main chassis to show construction. The 
aluminum braciiet is 1/8'' thick and transfers the power dissipated from the IC regulator into 
the main chassis. 



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HET UP 



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Fig. 13(al Block diagram of break^in timing system shown /n 
receive mode. Note that voltage C is inverse of voltage B. 



transmitter comes on, and 
some sidetone must be in- 
serted into the audio ampli* 
fier. The rf envelope must 
come up smootlilY to avoid 
over-the-air clicks, When 
the key is raised, nothing 
should happen until the rf 
output has smoothly died 
away; then the vfo shift 
must be reinstituled and 
the receiver reactivated. 
Most importantly, all of 



a VOLTS * 



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Fig. 73fbJ. Schematic diagram of break-in timing system. The transistors are general-purpose 
low power types. 

dO 73 Magazine • JulyJ9a2 



these big shifts in operating 
condition should occur 
rapidly, yet without causing 
undue disturbances in the 
output audio. Ideally, the 
operator listening to the 
receiver would hear his own 
keying fust as if it were 
coming from another sta- 
tion over the air. A very 
good break-in system is dif- 
ficult to come by, and the 
circuits worked out for this 
application, while not pro- 
viding perfect break-in, cer- 
tainly provide acceptable 
performance. 

The heart of the break-in 

circuitry, shown in Fig. 13, 
requires the addition of 
three transistors labeled 
Q1, Q2, and Q3. When the 
key is closed (keying cur- 
rent is 7 mA, which should 
be compatible with any 
keyer), Q107 is turned on di* 
rectly and its output turns 
on the transmitter and turns 
off the receiver audio with 
a circuit which will be de- 
scribed shortly. The ground- 
ed keying terminal also pro- 
vides a rapid discharge path 
for the 47'uF capacitor. 
Notice that while this 
capacitor can discharge 
through the signal diode, it 
must recharge more slowly 
through a 10k resistor. That 
inequality wilt provide a 
30-m5 recovery delay to 
keep the receiver off until 
the transmitter output has 
decayed completely away. 
The voltage across the 
4.7-uF capacitor drives the 
base of Q1 , and the emitter 
of that transistor is biased 
at about 2,4 volts by a for- 
ward-biased diode and an 
LED (which serves double 
duty as a front-panel power 
indicator). As the voltage at 
the base of Q1 rises and 
falls past 3 volts or so, the 
transistor turns on and oft 
switching in turn Q2 and 
Q3. The timing waveforms 
are shown in Fig. 13(c), with 
the exception of voltage B, 
which does pretty much the 
opposite of voltage C* The 
important fact to note is 
that while ail three of these 
controlling voltages switch 



simultaneously at key- 
down, only the collector 
voltage of Q107 switches 
immediately at key-up. As 
shown in Fig. 13tc), the 
30-ms delay gives plenty of 
time for the transmitter to 
get off the atr before the re- 
ceiver is turned back on. 
Also indicated in Fig. 13(b) 
and Fig. 16 is where the 
three controlling voltages 
go in the rig as a whole. 

The sequencing circuits 
just described give plenty 
of receiver protection dur- 
ing keying, but unfortunate- 
ly they are not thumpless. 
Some additional quieting 
was achieved with the addi* 
tion of the simple audio 
blanker shown in Fig. 14. 
Tve used this system for 
several months and find its 
performance quite accep- 
table. Being a bit of a 
perfectionist however, I 
have looked into the 
reasons for the remaining 
thumps The complete cure 
would seem to require a 
soft exponential transition 
of perhaps 10-ms time cons- 
tant on all of the keying 
waveforms controlling the 
receiver. The rf amplifier 
bias, second i-f bias, and 
age line inputs are relative- 
ly easy to filter by the addi- 
tion of the proper capac- 
itors, but vco buffer B + 
must be powered from a 
low-impedance source dur- 
ing transmit and so would 
require either the addition 
of another transistor or a 
change in the timing cir- 
cuits to ensure that the 
receiver is off when buffer 
B+ is stepped up or down, 
Turning the receiver off ex- 
ponentially may require a 
different sequencing circuit 
in any case to delay the 
transmitter turn-on. The 
system described in Fig. 13 
works fine, but if you enjoy 
experimenting, you might 
look into some variations. 

One last hint on reducing 
keying noise: Be sure to 

return the speaker ground 
wire to the circuit board as 
closely as possible to the 
ground pin of the audio IC. 



This will be pin 2 if the IC is 
a BA521 or pin 9 if it is a 
TA7205. Otherwise, the 
heavy transmitter keying 
current (around 1 Amp) can 
couple into the speaker wir- 
ing and cause a click that is 
not muted by the receiver 
gain control. 

Odds and Ends— Power 
Supply, Cabinet, Future 
Work 

All in all, this makes a 
very nice little CW rig. The 
only reason it might be 
classified as a toy is that it is 
so inexpensive to get on the 
air If your junk box con- 
tained several old transistor 
radios, the total cash outlay 
for the project to this point 
should be something less 
than $20. I built the rig to 
this level and used it for 
about a month before de- 
ciding on a cabinet The 
construction for the final 
enclosure is pretty well ex- 
plained by the photo- 
graphs. The board was 
mounted into the top sur- 
face of a 7" X 7" X 2" 
chassis, front, back, and 
bottom plates were added, 
and a U-shaped cover was 
fabricated to form the top 
and sides. A 2 Vi" x 4" oval 
speaker rescued from a 
junk TV set was mounted 
behind a grid of holes 
drilled in the top of the U. 
The holes were drilled using 
a piece of scrap perfboard 
as a guide— that made it 
easy to get such a nice even 
array. A piece of thin black 
cloth contact-cemented 
over the holes from the rear 
(after painting the box) pro- 
tects the speaker from dust 
and dirt. The U-shaped 
piece happens to be a sec- 
tion cut from a large steel 
chassis bottom plate so 1 
was able to solder nuts to 
the underside as anchors 
for the speaker mounting 
clamps. 

It is certainly a conve- 
nience to have a built-in ac- 
operated power supply, and 
with any number of ex- 
cellent IC regulators 
available for a couple of 




Fig. TJfcJf. Timing waveforms. Horizontal scale is 70 ms per 
division; character shown is one dot at 30-wpm rate. Trace 1 
is key-up position; 2 is key down; 3 is +8 volts and 4 is 
ground (voltage A, Q107 collector}; 5 is +8 volts and 6 is 

ground (voltage C Q3 collector); 7 is rf envelope output, 50 
volts/div., 62-Ohm dummy load. 



dollars, it seemed a shame 
to tie up a bench supply. 
The power supply shown in 
the photographs was built 
around a transformer and 
regulator found in my junk 
box. The circuit suggested 
in Fig. 1 5 will fit in the same 
space and shouldn't cost 
more than $1 5 if you buy all 
new parts. 



As can be seen in the 
photographs, the power 
supply is built as a separate 
module. The aluminium 
bracket is fashioned from 
part of an old 1/8" thick 
rack panel and fits up 
against the insides of the 
main chassis which then 
serves as a heat sink. To 
provide for portable opera- 



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Fig. 15, Suggested circuit for ac-operated power supply. 
Output voltage should be no lower than 12 to 12.5 volts at 
1.5 Amps of load current Output voltage may be adjusted 
by making small changes in Rl, 

73 Magazine • Jufy. 1982 31 



il 




The rear panel The antenna shield is ac coupled to the circuit board ground. Note the 
isolating washer around the external speaker jack. 



tion with an external 12'Volt 

battery, a DPDT switch and 
male jack are mounted on 
the rear of the set to select 
the desired power source. 
Note in Fig. 16 that the 
power switch on the back 
of the volume control is 
also a DPDT unit and that 
this allows switching of 
both the ac and dc power 
lines so that the switch will 
work with either internal or 
external supplies. 

What is not clear in the 
photographs or schematics 
is that the entire enclosure 
is isolated by capacitors 
from the circuit board's dc 
ground. This feature could 
prevent some fireworks if 
you used the rig in a car 
with a positive ground elec- 
trical system! The dc isola- 
tion is provided for on the 
board by separate foil 
mounting pads, but you 
have to be careful to use 
isolating washers when 
mounting the key and head- 
phone jacks. 

While on the subject of 
power supplies, a word or 

32 73 Magazine * JulyJ9e2 



two about dc supply volt- 
age is in order. The trans- 
mitter rf output will vary 
from set to set because of 
transistor differences, but it 
will always go up with in- 
creased supply voltage. 
With my transmitter, 11 
volts gives 3 Watts, 1 2 volts 
gives 4 Watts, 1 4 volts gives 
5 Watts, and 15 volts gives 
5.5 Watts of transmitter 
output. My power supply is 
set to deliver 12.7 volts on 
receive and this falls to 12 
volts on transmit because 
of the 1.5-Amp current 
drain. Going to a 15-volt 
supply would provide an ex- 
tra Watt and a half of out- 
put, but that is only 1.4 dB 
or less than V4 of an S-unit 
worth of signal gain. You 
will notice in the photo- 
graphs that the output tran- 
sistor's heat sink is not at- 
tached to the cabinet wall 
as intended for the CB ap- 
plication With a 12-volt 
supply, the final stage input 
is about 11 Watts, and with 
4 Watts of output power, 
that leaves 7 Watts of heat 



to be dissipated by the heat 
sink. After a long transmis- 
sion, the heat sink gets 
warm to the touch though 
not uncomfortably so. 
Higher input power would 
probably require that some 
attention be paid to this 
heat sink as welt as the pow* 
er supply. All in all, it 
doesn't seem worth the 
trouble for less than Vi of 
an S-unit- 

Whenever a power trans- 
former is mounted in close 
proximity to sensitive cir- 
cuits, the possibility exists 
of magnetically coupling 
60-Hz hum into the signal 
path. For this reason, the 
transformer was mounted 
as far as possible from the 
audio section of the printed 
circuit board. Despite this 
precaution, there was a 
noticeable amount of hum 
modulating the received 
signaEs whenever the inter- 
nal supply was used. This 
problem was completely 
cured by shielding the cir- 
cuit board from the trans- 
former with a2Vir' X aVa" 



plate of sheet steel. As can 
be seen in the under-chassis 
photograph, this shield is 
mounted directly between 
the power transformer and 
the circuit board with a 
slightly larger rectangle of 
thin cardboard between the 
shield and circuitry to pre- 
vent shorting the PC runs 
together. The longer wire 
ends protruding below the 
PC card were also trimmed 
with a pair of side cutters to 
keep them from wearing 
their way through the card- 
board- The shield is held in 
place by a nut soldered to 
one corner which is en- 
gaged by one of the screws 
holding the circuit board to 
the chassis. 

The conversion steps 
described in this article are 
mostly simple circuit 
changes, but they often re- 
quire the addition of sever- 
al parts to the modified cir- 
cuit If you haven't worked 
much with printed circuit 
boards, you may wonder 
how additional parts can be 
added to an existing foil 
pattern. Actually, there are 
several ways to accomplish 
that feat. 

First, there are lots of 
unused foil islands on this 
board. Most of these were 
supposed to be used in the 
addition of optional fea- 
tures and so are available to 
use when making circuit ad- 
ditions. 

Next, there is a lot that 
can be done to add parts by 
modifying existing foil runs. 

Often in changing a circuit 
a long foil run is freed up 
when the component or cir- 
cuit at one end is no longer 
needed, A sharp knife can 
be used to cut and remove 
a short section to open the 
circuit, and then the re- 
mainder of the run can be 
sectioned into several other 
islands. To make connec- 
tion to these islands, a small 
hole can be drilled next to 
the foil (runs are so narrow 
that drilling a hole through 
them can ruin them) and 
the paint scraped off the 
copper to permit soldering. 



SOM 





MATH 




FROM MICROLOG 



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51 



MICROLOG 



See List of Advertisers on page TM 



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73 Magazine • July, 1962 33 



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Fig. 16. Block diagram oi the converted transceiver. 



Be sure to leave the section 
of copper long enough that 
the whole strip won't come 
unglued when you solder to 
it Remember that for modi- 
fication purposes the pri- 
mary need is for compo- 
nent support since the ac- 
tual circuit connections can 
be made with small in- 
sulated jumpers. To pro- 
vide adequate support, it is 
not necessary that each of a 
component's leads be an- 
chored to the foil. It is quite 
acceptable, for example, to 
have a small resistor stand- 
ing upright with only one 
end actually soldered to the 
board and the top end con- 
nected elsewhere with a 
jumper. 

It is also possible to 
make connections by sol- 
dering new leads to other 
wires where they come out 
on the top of the circuit 
board, though this tech- 
nique is less desirable 
because it can mean that to 
disconnect one component 
may require unsoldering 
several 

The principal thing to re- 
member when you're look- 

34 73 Magazine • July J 962 



ing for a way to add a com- 
ponent is that you're modi- 
fying the board, not manu- 
facturing it. Amateurs often 
unconsciously accept the 
manufacturer's techniques 
as ideal standards when ac- 
tually the manufacturer 
laid out the board the way it 
is only so that it could be 
built efficiently and reliably 
by the people and ma- 
chines on his production 
line. The techniques sug- 
gested here, while certainly 
not as efficient in construe* 
tion time, can be just as reli- 
able as the manufacturer's 
if they are applied neatly 
and carefully. Take the 
time to make good neat sol- 
der joints. If a part seems 
loose on top of the board or 
a component wire has to 
support a heavy mass, use a 
dab of epoxy to help carry 
the load. A lot of the probh 
lems I had with these 
boards were due to some- 
thing like a support wire on 
one of the output coils 
coming loose on the under- 
side of the board and caus- 
ing intermittent open cir- 
cuits. A little care in con- 



struction can make a big 
difference in reliability. 

This project got started 
because the basic circuit 
board was so cheap that I 
jUSt had to find a use for it. 
The guiding philosophy has 
been to keep the cost down 
by avoiding expensive or ex- 
otic parts. There are no 
crystals to be ordered and 
no strange ICs you have to 
mail away for; if your junk 
box doesn't have what you 
need, the local parts store 
probably does. This design 
approach has produced a 
rig whose performance is 
better than 1 had expected, 
but there are still improve- 
ments to be made by the ex- 
perimenter. The thing 
which has the biggest pay- 
off potential is an improved 
bfo. The 10.695-MHz tech- 
nique works, but the bfo 
signal passes through all of 
the i-f stages of the receiver 
and that puts a limit on the 
i-f gain usable (before the 
receiver chokes on its own 
bfo) and probably gener* 
ates some spurious re- 
sponses as well. A bfo at 
455 kHz has several advan* 



tages aside from the i-f con- 
siderations: The detector 
stage could be replaced 

with one of the simpler 
product detectors for bet- 
ter linearity, a separate age 
detector could be included 
and the age put back into 
service, and (though much 
less important) the S-meter 
could be hooked back up. 
There are two ways to go 
about adding the bfo— with 
and without a crystal If you 
have or can get a 455-kHz 
crystal, you're all set other* 
wise, you might try making 
a free-running oscillator 
with an old i-f transformer. 
The free-running version 
may work fine — after all, 
the frequency is low and 
drift certainly isn't the prob- 
lem it used to be in the vac- 
uum tube days. 

In closing I would like to 
express my appreciation for 
the photography and help 
with the text tendered by 
Steve W1CSL. In a project 
of this size, it is easy to get 
lost in small details, so an 
impartial but informed ob- 
server is an invaluable 
aid.B 



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73 Magazine • July. 1982 



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i^Stt U$t ttt Adv^tfi^ts Off page ti4 



73Magazine • July. 1982 37 



Chm Brown KA1D 
PO Box 4B5 
Croton MA 01450 



Hands Across the Water 

CW lives on historic Cape Cod 



The operator casually 
twirls the passband 
control of a %7fiOO Wat kins 
Johnson receiver as he 
peels another CW signal off 
the side of a noisy pileup. 
He's been at it — slapping 
out 20-word-per-minute CW 
— for almost eight hours 
now. Soon his shift will be 
over and someone else will 
take his place. 

As he concludes another 
contact, he habitually spins 
the antenna switch, sam- 



CALL 



NAME 



KB1AO 


Rgnald Farris 


N1AVT 


Waiter Doucette, Jr 


K1GRM 


James Richards 


W1JE 


Wi am Fisbback 


W1KL 


Wi liam Ryder 


K1LJS 


Lewis Massan 


W1SCD 


William Pyne 


WAisrv 


Timothy Call 


K1TV 


Ralph Siebert 


K1WF 


William Fafris, Jr. 


K1WT 


Wallace Turzyn 


KA1YT 


Phillip Davis 


W4GEX 


Robert Nofloff 



fig. 7, List of hams working 
at WCC 

38 73Magaiine • July, 1982 



pling the various rhombics 
he uses for receiving while 
trying to pull yet another 
signal up out of the pack 
that has zero-beat on top of 
him, Europe, the Med, the 
Persian Gulf, Africa, the 
South Atlantic — as the 
rhomb ics click by, one sig- 
nal finally surfaces above 
the rest. 



Tapping his bug in re- 
sponse, the operator keys 
his remote transmitter. 
From the shore of a sleepy 
tidal marsh green with sea 
grass five miles away, his 
antennas — mostly dou- 
blets, dipoles, and curtains 
— march out toward the 
rolling Atlantic, Two 4-500s 
drive two 4- 5000s and his 




Fig, 2 In this rustic, ivy-covered huilding with a history as 
hng as radio communication itselt 900 messages a day are 
handled by 21 professional CW operators, almost half of 
whom are han\s. 



signal is easily heard on the 
other side of the world. 

After a brief exchange of 
formalities, the text of a 
message is passed between 
another ship at sea and the 
largest and oldest commer- 
cial CW station stilt operat- 
ing in the United States: 
RCA Clobecom's WCC. In a 
few minutes the shift will 
end, the paddle will be 
passed, and another watch 
in the life of a professional 
CW operator will come to 
an end on Cape Cod. 

Back In Time 

Visiting WCC, RCA's ma- 
rine message-handling sta- 
tion in the town of 
Chatham, Massachusetts, a 
good ways out on Cape 
Cod, is like taking a trip 
back through time Once 
there, youVe back in the 
Golden Age of shortwave 
radio communications. The 
rustic ivy-covered brick 
buildings, erected by the 
Marconi Company in 1914 
[only eleven years after the 
first transoceanic radio 




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73 Magazine • July J 982 39 





Fig, 1 At a remote transmitter site on the edge of a tidal 
marsh. WCC's antennas march out toward the Atlantic 
Ocean. These doublets and dipoles are fed with WkW of ri 
on 6, 8, 12, 16, and 21 megahertz. 



message was sent from 
nearby South Wellfleet), 
are still intact Most stand 
vacant now, victims oi a 
technology to which they 
helped give birth. One, 
however, is as busy as ever. 

Though methods of long- 
range radio communica- 
tions have changed drasti- 
cally during the last 60 
years, the nobility of WCC 
remains. This station, which 
once provided weather in- 
formation for Charies Lind- 
bergh, maintained contact 
with Richard Byrd on his ill- 
fated trek to the pole, and 
monitored, then lost, Amel- 
ia Earhart's distant trans- 
missions, has survived. And. 
in spite of the pressures for 
modernization, develop- 
ment, and progress sur- 
rounding them, these build- 
ings, like the CW they shel- 
ter, are holding their ground 
in 1982. 

What impresses most on 
a visit to WCC is the fact 
that in this high-speed, 
packet radio, orbiting-satel- 
tite world we live in, there is 
still a place where the 
Morse code is hammered 
out twenty-four hours a 
day, for a profit 

Edgar Hammons, manag- 
er of WCC: 'Wefl, though 
we've seen a gradual de- 
cline over the last four 
years in the number of CW 
messages we handle, we're 
still quite busy.'' Though it 

40 73 Magazine •July, 1382 



may be on the decline, the 
WCC CW traffic list is, 
nonetheless, impressive. 
During the course of one 
twenty-four-hour operating 
day, 900 messages will be 
handled by WCC — most of 
them on CW, In rotating 
shifts, the station's 21 CW 
operators provide thou- 
sands of ships at sea with a 
reliable and inexpensive 
means of contacting their 
home offices- 

"Satellites and digital 
communications are fine/' 
says Hammons, but, he 
adds, ''they are also ex- 
tremely expensive to install 
and maintain/' A modern 
shipboard satellite terminal 
can cost a ship owner over 
$50,000. As a result, many 
owners cling to CW and 
WCC as their only reliable 
communications link. 

In addition to conven- 
tional CW, WCC offers cus- 
tomers with the proper 
equipment SITOR commu- 
nications services. SITOR 
(Simplex Telex Over Radio) 
operates as an answer-back 
RTTY system. Running at 75 
baud (50 wpm), SITOR 
transmitters and receivers 
at WCC echo message char- 
acters back to the ships that 
transmitted them. The re- 
sult is error-free automated 
copy. In some instances, 
SITOR-equipped ships and 
their home offices can be 
connected directly through 
WCC for more private (and 




Fig. 4. A new sign welcomes visiting amateurs to RCA's 
oldest commercial radio facility. 



expedient) communica- 
tions. A three-minute 
SITOR exchange with WCC 
costs an American ship 
about $9, a substantial sav- 
ings over the CW rate which 
is based on a 52<f-per-word 
charge. 

For the time being, how- 
ever, CW is still the main- 
stay of WCC operations. 
After the hourly traffic list 
is broadcast by the station 
on the 4-, 8-, 12% 16-, and 
22- meg a hertz marine 
bands, CW signals pile up 
for each of the eight opera- 
tors manning the shift. 
Once he establishes con- 
tact with a ship, a WCC op- 
erator types the text of the 
message he has received or 
sends the text of the mes- 
sage he is holding. Received 
messages at WCC are 
passed to one of three print- 
er clerks via a small convey- 
or belt. The printer clerks 
then key the typewritten 
messages into a teleprinter 
that connects directly to an 
RCA message-center com- 
puter in New lersey. At this 
point, the computer takes 
over and automatically 
telexes the message to its 
final destination. 

The obvious thing about 
WCC's message-handling 
procedures is that they are 
highly labor intensive: It 
takes a lot of people to get 
a message delivered. Ac- 



cording to manager Mam- 
mons, however, staffing the 
station poses little problem, 
despite its location on 
remote Cape Cod, "We 
have no openings here at 
present/' says Mammons, 
"although we frequently 
do. In fact/' he adds, "I 
have two applications for 
CW operator in my desk 
drawer right now. Tell your 
readers that I'm always 
glad to get new applica- 
tions, though/' 

WCC's operating staff 
numbers 34; 21 are CW op- 
erators, nine are marine 
telex clerks, and four are 
technicians. There are 13 
hams on the staff (See Ftg. 
11 almost 40% of the total 
employees! The starting sal- 
ary for a CW operator is ap- 
proximately $23,000 per 
year and the present con- 
tract calls for 10% yearly 
increases in wages. 

Where does WCC find 
professional CW aficiona- 
dos to man its station? Basi- 
cally, there are two sources. 
Station operators come 
from the ranks of the mili- 
tary or from the ranks of 
amateur radio. Of the 21 
full-time CW operators at 
WCC, eight are hams In ad- 
dition, all four technicians 
who attend to the day-to- 
day equipment mainte- 
nance and repair are hams. 

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Fig. 5. K1 TV manning the SITOR trdnsmitter 




Fig. 6. A typical WCC operating position. Emphasis is put on 
receiver performance and typing ability. 



hams operating at WCC in- 
cludes a second class com- 
mercial telegraph license 
and a welt-worn Vibroplex 
bug Hand keys are avail- 
able at each operating posi- 
tion, but, in 3 partial con- 
cession to modern ity. most 
operators prefer to use their 
own mechanical keyer. No 
electronic keyers are in evi- 
dence, although one ham 
on the staff has been experi- 
menting with the use of a 
CW keyboard, 

Traffic at WCC is usually 
passed at around 15 words 
per minute but, in some 
cases, more slowly if the 
shipboard operator is not 
up to speed with the WCC 
crew, The quality of the 
code coming into WCQ 
both in tone and in style, 
varies. Some shipboard sig- 
nals chirp like late-night 
Russian DX on 40 meters, 

42 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



and some of the fists send- 
ing these signals are straight 
out of the Novice bands. 

Through it all, however, 
the cool professionalism of 
the WCC crew prevails It is 
only rarely that the text of a 
message must be repeated 
by a tired operator in a dis- 
tant port of cal 



The Future at WCC 

The future of WCC as a 
CW operation is open to 
question. Ed Mammons, 
conceding that CW is being 
eclipsed by the more cost- 
effective SITOR system, 
thinks CW will be around 
for some time, however. "I 
believe that we will always 
have Morse code/' he said, 
adding that 'eventually it 
may not be the biggest seg- 
ment of our business/' 
Hammons went on to say 
that SITOR is gaining in 




Fig. 7. Outgoing traffic is posted on the WCC message 
board. Betvi/een 700 and TOOO pieces of traffic are handled 
on a typical day. 



popularity rapidly and that, 
at present, WCC is handling 
a new ship on SITOR almost 
every day. 

For the CW operators at 
WCC, all of whom take 
turns babysitting the SITOR 
equipment now and then, 
CW remains more than a 
business, for most, it is a 
passion. One of them who 
argued most adamantly for 
the maintenance of high- 
quality standards on CW, as 
well as for the retention of 
CW as a requirement for 
amateur licensing, was not 
even a ham. He simply felt 
that CW was '^something 
special, something human" 
in our digitally-automated 
world of tomorrow. 

Sentimentality aside, the 
fact remains that a substan* 
tial portion of the message 
traffic that passes between 
the U.S. merchant fleet and 
their home offices in this in- 
formation age in which we 
live does so via CW, For be- 
leagured CW stalwarts who 



constantly find themselves 
on the defensive when con- 
fronted by their SSB- or 
ASCII-loving ham brethren, 
that may be comforting to 
remember. 

It may also be reassuring 
to remember that, should 
the cares of this modern in- 
formation age become too 
great, there is an alterna- 
tive In a quiet village on 
old Cape Cod there is an 
ivy-covered building with a 
history as long as radio 
communications itself 
where a CW-loving ham can 
earn a decent living by 
pounding out ten kilowatts 
of Morse for all the ships at 
sea. All he needs is a love of 
CW and a well-broken-in, 
vintage Vibroplex bug. 

Amateurs visiting Cape 
Cod are welcome to tour 
WCC The station manage- 
ment requests that all visits 
be made between 8 am and 
4 pm, weekdays only, and, 
when possible, arranged 
one day in advance. ■ 



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73 Magazine • July J 962 43 



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44 73 Magazine ■ July, 1982 



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73 Magazine • July, 1982 45 



Alfred Faotir. WB5WAF 
Applied Research LEbofatories 
10000 Burnet Rd 
Austin TX 78753 



A Three-Piece CPO 

battery not included 



Recently, f had need of 
a code-practice oscilla- 
tor to teach a Girl Scout 
troop how to properly send 
the international distress 
signals. We had already 
learned the emergency sig- 
nals for ground-to-air, rail- 
roads, and the trucking in- 



dustry, (How would you sig- 
nal an oncoming train that 
a bridge was washed out?) It 
was just as important that 
the girls knew how to signal 
for help using Morse code. 
Hence, our program on 
emergency connmunica- 
tions. 



I>r[>r-[>H> 



c 



r^ 



SPEAKER 



_n n fi R n Ji n 



T404 



u u tr u u IT 



ir>iii 141 < ^ 



iPm 7^^ '-* 



VOLTAGE DliVIOCR 



iOO 



SCfeO 



1 



ev 



Fig. 1, The simplest cpo. The IC /s a 7404 low-power Schott- 
ky hex inverter. C rs a 5- to 30-y^ electrolytic selected for 
desired pitch. The speaker is a 2-incK B-Ohm unit 




The cpo itself was built 
using 1 IC, 1 capacitor, and 
1 speaker! The volume was 
sufficient for our meeting 
area and four C-cells wired 
in series provided the re- 
quired 6 volts. Did I say 6 
volts? Oh, yes, not wishing 
to build a 5-volt power sup- 
ply (as required by the 
Schottky IC) for the circuit, 
I just used a voltage-divider 
network consisting of two 
resistors wired in series with 
the battery pack. One resis- 
tor was 10 Ohms, the other 
was 50 Ohms. The 50-Ohm 
resistor will function just 
like a miniature 5-volt bat- 
tery. One end of the resistor 
wil[ be the positive terminal 
and the other end will be 



the negative terminal. The 
current drain of the I C is so 
small that there is no prob- 
lem with this arrangement. 

The circuit was soldered 
directly to an IC socket and 
the speaker. I could have 
soldered directly to the (C 
pins, but happened to have 
a spare 14-pin socket in my 
junk box 

I used two 100-Ohm resis- 
tors in parallel to produce 
50 Ohms, A standard 51* 
Ohm resistor would have 
worked just as well, as the 
maximum voltage for the IC 
is 5.25 volts. 

The schematic diagram is 
self-explanatory. Build it 

and enjoy! I 




46 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



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side continental USA and in Miss^ssippf. ^j? 

lUIB I ENTERPRISES, 

IvirV INCORPORATED 

Box 494. Mrssissippi State, MS 39762 

73 Magazine • July, 1982 47 






Don ft Cross W3QVC 
RD 6. Scaffe Road 
Se\¥ickievPA 15143 

Bert C De Kat VB3DP3 

PO Box 137 
iynden, Omar to 
CamdaLOR 7 TO 



Coherent CW for VHF 



will it work? 



The so-called system of 
"coherent CW/' which 
is actually a form of 
matched filtering with ex- 
tremely narrow band- 
widths, has been applied to 
the high-frequency spec- 
trum and should have inter- 
esting VHF applications. In- 
formation is typicallv com- 
mynicated at a bandwidth 
of only 10 H2, resulting in a 
remarkably high signat-to- 
noise ratio. Successful con- 
tacts have been carried on 
at low power levels (such as 
1 Watt) on 80 meters and 
over long distances (Califor- 
nia to Asia) on 20 meters. 



Interesting technical by- 
products have been the de- 
velopment and use of the 
Petit filter with readily ad- 
justable narrow band- 
widths, the production and 
use of high-quality frequen- 
cy synthesizers, and major 
advances in frequency sta- 
bility, along with greatly im- 
proved methods of frequen- 
cy measurement. Another 
important factor is the use 
of keyers with precision 
timing and phasing for each 
bit of each Morse element, 
using either the Accu-Keyer 
or special computer keying 
programs. 



,CIMN»tEL A 



. 



WPUT 



-^ 



SWlTCWNia l*l«£RS ||fT£&A«T0ifl5 \ SAMPLE 



H> 



^p^- 



SMAZ 



;t^c(* 






SHD2- 






\ 



SDA 



T^CH A 



ffj 



^> 



fn 



CHANNEL B 
fff I iff 

S$& 



cie 



k. SUB 






I 



O 



*T^ CH 8 



m 



+ 4 



-^ SMAI 



1> 



-> SMfi! 



-> SMAZ 



{> 



-> SMBS 



SDA 



SSA 



miMPAT ENt> 
OF WINDOW 



SAMPLE jyST 
DEFORE EN& 

OF WINDOW 



eOHEHEMT-iNTEGRATION 
SAMPLE/DUMP CONTROL 



CENTER FHEOUENCt 
x4 REFERENCE 



To our knowledge, the 
application of all of these 
technologies has not been 
made to VHF communica- 
tion, but some of them may 
hold promise for important 
future advances at these 
higher frequencies. 

Why Narrow Bandwidth 
at VHF? 

The use of FM and the 
promise of packet commu- 
nication of digital informa- 
tion at high speeds has 
drawn attention to the ad- 
vantages of the wider band- 
widths available at VHF. 
But for some applications, 



OUTPUT MIKEAS 
SOAl 



^- 



50A2 



soei 



CDM&INfR 



AUDIO 
OUTPUT 







>S0AI 
> SOAZ 



DESIREO OUTPUT 
FH£tJU£NCT K 4 



PHASE 
AaJUSTHENT 



C OHEf»E*l T - W i.f*0O* 
BEFEREfiCE 



fig. 1. Block diagram of the Petit filter (ofiginally appeared ir} QST, May, 19811 

48 73 Magazine « JulyJ962 



a completely opposite ap- 
proach may be better. Sup- 
pose that we would prefer 
to get maximum range or 
highest intelligibility for on- 
ly a brief message or one 
that might just as well go 
slowly. This could be, for in- 
stance, where the most im* 
portant information might 
be evidence of contact 
through call letters and a 
signal report 

Let us make a simplifying 
assumption (not exactly 
true) that the methods of 
modulation and detection 
would be the same for ei- 
ther wide- or narrow*band- 
width communication and 
that the bandwidth re- 
quired is the same as the 
bits sent per second. Curi- 
ously, 10 kHz completely 
filled for one second with 
10,000 bits of information 
(as in a packet] would trans- 
mit exactly the same num- 
ber of bits as 1 ,000 separate 
channels, each 10 Hz wide 
and each transmitting only 
10 bits during the second 
(as in CCW). Noise power on 
each channel is proportion- 
ate to channel bandwidth, 
So, for the same signal-to- 
noise ratio, each narrow- 
band signal using one milli- 
watt would do as well as the 
packet transmitter using 1 
Watt, All the narrowband 
stations together would use 



1 Watt — or if we preferred 
to use only one channel, we 

would use the same total 
amount of energy by taking 
1,000 seconds to send the 
same message! 

Thus, neither method has 
an inherent advantage in 
bits of information per unit 
of transmitted energy. So 
our choke will be made by 
whether we prefer speed at 
higher power or slowness at 
lower power (or perhaps 
greater range at the same 
power, at the sacrifice of 
speed). 

We should note that if 
the total time is mfnimalty 
used by packets or if the 
total frequencies are mini- 
mally used by lower-power 
narrowband signals, the 
chances of interference to 
either mode by the other 
mode in the same frequen- 
cy range are very slight. 
Each tends to be immune to 
the other. (This will not ap- 
ply, of course, if some 
greedy DXer tries a kilowatt 
on CCW!) 

The Narrowband 
Matched Filler 

We usually think of 
Morse code in terms of dot 
and dash patterns, each at- 
tached to a particular let- 
ter, number, etc. But Morse 
can be just as well con- 
ceived as a digital system 
based on an "on" ( = one) or 
"off" ( = zero) condition 
during a series of equal 
time intervals. Each time in- 
terval would be the length 
of a dot. A dot is a single 
one. A dash becomes three 
consecutive ones A space 
within a character is usually 
one zero, between charac- 
ters is three consecutive ze- 
roes, and between words is 
seven consecutive zeroes. 

If the timing of the Morse 
transmitter is precisely con- 
trolled, it will be sending a 
serial stream of digital in- 
formation in classical bina- 
ry form Then a receiver can 
be constructed with a filter 
and detector carefully 



matched to decipher the 
digital message. 

Despite the title of "co- 
herent" CW, there is no way 
to preserve the phase co- 
herence between the trans- 
mitted and received waves. 
Ionospheric or tropospheric 
media always cause some 
phase disturbances. The 
true essence of CCW is in 
the use of a matched filter 

At code speeds used by 

amateurs, bandwidths of 
matched filters can be ex- 
tremely small Typical dot 
lengths are a tenth of a sec- 
ond, producing about 12- 
wpm code speed. A Petit fil- 
ter matched to such a signal 
has a 3-d B bandwidth of on- 
ly 9 Hz This allows for an 
outstandingly good signal- 
to-noise ratio. 

The Petit Filter 

The Petit filter refers to a 
design by Ray Petit 
W7GHM. Although the de- 
tails of its circuit are de- 
scribed in the bibliography 
at the end of this article and 
will not be repeated here, a 
block diagram is shown in 
Fig. 1, The filter has several 
distinct features: 

1, It operates near zero 
beat. Usually the filter bfo 
is at 1 kHz and it tunes to a 
receiver signal output very 
close to 1 kHz. 

2, Two filter channels 
are used with a 90-degree 
phase difference between 
them. This quadrature phas- 
ing is necessary because 
near zero beat there is al- 
ways the possibility that 
output in one channel 
alone might be in such a 
phase as to give almost no 
output, In that case, the 
quadrature channel output 
would be nearly maximum. 
Adding the two channels 
ensures an output when- 
ever a signal is realty pres- 
ent. The phase shift be- 
tween the two T-kHz-filter 
bfo signals is obtained by 
properly dividing 4 kHz by 4 

3, Matching is achieved 
by using a high-precision 

secondary frequency stan- 
dard to control all func- 








-50 



♦0 



-30 -20 -iO «0 go 

FREQueKlCr FfiOW CENT Eft, Hi 



«0 



Fig. Z Petit filter response curve(ongina!lY appeared in CQ, 
/une 1977). 



tions on both transmitter 
and receiver This not only 
ensures close tolerance in 
receiver tuning (within 1 
Hzl but also close syn- 
chronization between re- 
ceived digital pulses and fil- 
ter putse sampling. A con- 
trol led-pulse repetition rate 
is not sufficient to hold this 
synchronization; the phas- 
ing of the time sampled by 
the filter must also be ad- 
justed so that the transmit- 
ted signal is framed within a 
''window'' opened to each 
signal pulse. Ten phasing- 
switch positions allow ad- 
justment of the framing in 
lO-ms steps. Initial adjust- 
ment is made by listening 
for the clearest reception of 
a series of transmitted dots, 
4. Each 100-ms window 
opening is the result of an 
integrating circuit in each 
filter channel. The integrat- 
ed output is remembered 
for the next 100 ms by a 
sample-and-hold circuit. 
The latter either sets the 
level of a tone modulator 
for audio readout or else 
crosses a threshold for digi* 
tal detection. At the end of 
the 100*ms interval, the out- 
put of the integrator is 
dumped by a shorting 
switch so that the next sam- 
ple can begin. Note that the 
total independence of each 
sampling time interval dis- 
allows the "ringing' so 
common to very selective 
bandpass filters Ringing is 
a condition of slow buildup 
and decay that can make a 
Morse signal sound so 
mushy as to be unreadable. 
The Petit filter is immune to 
ringing, 



The selectivity curve of 
the Petit filter is shown in 
Fig. 2. It does have side 

lobes that are still fairly 
high, although they remain 
quite close to center fre- 
quency. These side lobes 
might be diminished or 
eliminated by using other 
kinds of filters or by modi- 
fying the Petit filter. They 
are partly the consequence 
of the assumption in the de- 
sign of the Petit type of fit- 
ter that the Morse digital in- 
formation is in pulses with 
zero rise and fall times — an 
inaccurate assumption. 

Bandwidth may be ad- 
justed easily by changing 
the sampling time interval 
For instance, 1 -second dot 
intervals will produce a 
bandwidth of only about 1 
Hz, pulling signals out of 
the noise in a most impres- 
sive manner, 

Signal-to-Noise 
Improvements 

Some taped samples of 
80-meter signals received 
by W3QVC and lab tests 
by W7CHM using the Petit 
filter are available for 
loan/purchase/copy from 
W3QVC at a minimal cost. 

On an abstract numerical 
basis, signal-to-noise ratio is 
inversely proportional to re- 
ceiver bandwidth. Thus, a 
10-Hz-wide channel would 
give a signal-to-noise power 
advantage of 210 times (23 
dB) compared to a 210C^Hz 
channel (a typical band- 
width for SSB voice com- 
munication). 

In practice^ the human 
ears and brain allow a de- 
gree of concentration on 

73Magazfne • July, 1982 49 



the single tone of a CW sig- 
nal that is the equivalent of 
a much narrower band- 
width than the wider filter 
would indicate alone. This 
effect has varying evalua- 
tions. One estimate (Wood- 
son, QSL May, 1981) is that 
''this skill is worth at least a 
6"dB margin when using a 
2300-Hz filter, QRM, how- 
ever, is often a confusion 
factor and therefore causes 
more degradation of copy 
than an equivalent amount 
of random noise. These psy- 
chological factors are diffi- 
cult to quantify, but prob- 
ably reduce the advantage 
of CCW over ordinary CW/' 

Woodson then gives 
comparisons of CW and 
CCW at different power lev- 
els in 14-MHz communica- 
tions in 1975 between 
JR1ZZR and W6BB. Both 
modes were taped simulta- 
neously on separate stereo 
channels and each channel 
was played back to four 
moderately experienced 
CW operators. The conclu- 
sion saw ''an estimated 
13-W CW signal as equiva- 
lent to a 1-W CCW signal 
in communications effec- 
tiveness, or a 24-dB superi- 
ority for CCW." (He should 
have said '71 dB" for that 
power gain.) 

The taped laboratory ex- 
periments of W7CHM indi- 
cate that a CW signal 5 dB 
below the white nois§ level 
using a 500-Hz fitter is just 
barely audible and only oc- 
casionally readable. The 
addition of a 10-Hz-wide 
Petit filter brings it to an 
easily copied level at what 
Petit describes as a "signal- 
to-noise ratio of 12 to 15 
dB." 

When Petit then drops a 
signal 14 dB below the 
noise and changes his filter 
to only 1-Hz bandwidth, the 
results are truly astonish- 
ing. The signal goes from 
completely lost in the noise 
up to 15 dB above the 
noise^a gain of 29 dB! 

Frequency Stability 

A narrowband system 
can work only if its overall 

50 JSMagazine • July, 1982 



frequency stability is within 
its bandwidth. Channels 10 
Hz wide will tolerate errors 
of only a few Hz. Two fac- 
tors affect frequency stabil- 
ity: (1) phase changes due to 
variations in the propaga- 
tion characteristics of the 
medium through which the 
wave is sent, and (2) the ac- 
curacy of the frequency- 
control systems for the 
transmitter and receiver. 

Phase changes during 
propagation set an almost 
absolute limit to the nar- 
rowness of the bandwidth 
that can be used. How 
could we imagine, for in- 
stance, that a VHP signal 
broadly modulated by the 
undulations of aurora re- 
flection could be contained 
within alO-Hz channel? 

So far we do have some 
experience with CCW in 
long-distance HF communi- 
cation. Woodson says: "For 
14-MHz signals, motion in 
the F layer typically pro- 
duces 2 or 3 Hz of phase (or 
frequency) modulation for 
a JA to W6 path. (We have 
also observed what appears 
to be propagation time de- 
lays under poor band condi- 
tions.)" Woodson goes on 
to speculate about VHF ap- 
plications: "CCW might be 
used for EME communica- 
tion, but the problem is 
complicated because of 
lunar-motion Doppler ef- 
fects. One might need a 
computer to calculate the 
frequency at which the sig- 
nal is expected to return." 

A more practical solution 
to the Doppler problem 
with satellite repeaters 
might be reached through 
tight phase-locking to the 
satellite beacon signal, fol- 
lowed by computerized se- 
lection of the receiver fre- 
quency for a given transmit- 
ter, Even this would involve 
the solution of a complex 
puzzle. 

VHF experimenters will 
have to discover what at- 
mospheric conditions will 
allow the practical applica- 
tion of CCW to the VHP and 
UHF bands, Exactly what 



phase shift is introduced in 
tropospheric propagation? 
Can frequency modulation 
be confined to 2 or 3 Hz? 
On what bands, under 
which circumstances? 

Questions like these, 
with answers not yet avail- 
able, determine the ulti- 
mate possible narrowing of 
bandwidths. But the picture 
is less cloudy, indeed hope- 
ful, when we consider the 
area of equipment frequen- 
cy contn 



Secondary 
Frequency Standards 

The accepted frequency 
accuracy for HF CCW 
equipment ts one part in ten 
to the seventh power. This 
allows for an error of not 
more than 1 to 2 Hz in ei- 
ther the transmitter or the 
receiver — adequate for 
lOHz bandwidths. The re- 
quired precision is met by 
careful ly constructed 
room-temperature oscilla- 
tors with temperature com- 
pensation through suitable 
capacitors across the crys- 
tal. 

VHF CCW calls for at 
least an order of magnitude 
of improvement in frequen- 
cy accuracy. Frequency 
standards dependable to 
one part in ten to the eighth 
are not so simple. They use 
excellent crystals and both 
crystal and oscillator are 
enclosed in two concentric 
proportionately tempera- 
ture-controlled ovens. The 
one ray of hope for amateur 
use of these standards is 
that they are available on 
the surplus market from 
time to time, currently cost- 
ing about $75. 

The setting of the exact 
frequency of such a stan- 
dard is also a problem — but 
not unsolvable. HF propa- 
gation phase shift makes 
WWV unusable for most 
people for standardizing 
frequency to better than 
one part in ten to the 
seventh. Higher accuracies 
can be obtained from one 
of three comparisons: (1) 
with WWVB at 60 kHz, (2) 
with Loran C at 100 kHz, or 



(3) with TV network color- 
burst signals. 

Comparison With 
Primary Standards 

Don Cross has developed 
a receiver that allows the 
signal from WWVB to gate 
a frequency counter. The 
frequency of his secondary 
standard is multipiied by 
ten, resuiting in a 10-MHz 
wave to be counted, By us- 
ing 100-second gate times, 
his standard can be mea- 
sured to parts in ten to the 
ninth. Counting errors are 
typically only 1.4 digits (or 
1 .4 parts in ten to the ninth] 
during the midday hours 
when 60-kHz propagation is 
most stable. The addition of 
a voltage-variable capaci- 
tor to the frequency stan- 
dard allows easy trimming 
adjustments to a part in ten 
to the ninth. Drift is so slight 
that such trimming is need- 
ed only two or three times a 
week. 

Such high accuracies are 
possible when WWVB is re- 
ceived on a good balanced 
and shielded loop antenna 
and when the receiver 
bandwidth is narrow 
enough to provide a good 
signal-to-noise ratio. The 
Gross receiver converts the 
60-kHz signal to 1.11 kHz, 
where it passes through an 
N-path filter only 0.1 Hz 
wide. It is then re-converted 
to 60 kHz, limited and zero- 
crossing detected, then fre- 
quency divided to provide 
the counter gate control. 
Both the down- and the up- 
con vers ions use heterodyn- 
ing frequencies derived 
from the secondary stan- 
dard. 

Bert De Kat has devel- 
oped an effective and fairly 
simple method of measur- 
ing frequency by using Lor- 
an C. He uses a switch-con- 
trolled frequency-divider 
system to derive from his 
secondary standard the 
pulse repetition rate (PRF) 
of any Loran C station. (This 
divider is derived from Fig, 
7, Burhans, 73, May, 1978, 
ignoring the slave window 
timer.) He sets his PRF to 



coincide with the nearest 
station and uses this local- 
ly-derived signal to trigger 
his oscilloscope. A broad- 
banded TOOkHz shielded 
loop and amplifier provide 
the Loran C signal to be dis- 
played on the scope. By 
switching to a one-digit mis- 
count in the divided fre- 
quency, the position of the 
display can be slowly 
moved across the screen 
until it reaches a suitable 
spot; the count is then cor- 
rected and the waveform 
stays in position. By using a 
high-grade oscilloscope, it 
Is possible to expand any 
small portion of the 
100-kHz waveform. By 
choosing the third zero- 
crossing of a pulse being 
built up, it is easy to keep 
track of the length of time 
that part of the wave moves 
across a measured part of 
the screen. This information 
can be used to measure the 
phase drift of the secondary 
standard. This measure is 
highly accurate, since the 
chosen part of the wave- 
form is purely ground-wave 
and therefore stable in its 
propagation. Frequency is 
readily measured in parts in 
ten to the ninth or better 

Other methods of precise 
frequency measurement 
are covered in the bibliog- 
raphy. 

Frequency Synthesizers 

Since every frequency 
and timing element must be 
accurately controlled, high- 
quality frequency synthe- 
sizers are important. Ray 
Petit has done outstanding 
work in this direction. Al- 
though the bibliographic 
references to his synthesiz- 
ers do not represent his lat- 
est developments, they 
show examples of excellent 
equipment that can be used 
to tune in either lOOHz or 
IO-H2 increments, afl 
phase-locked to the second- 
ary frequency standard, 

Keyers 

The keyer that lends it- 
self especially well to the 
timing requirements of 



CCW is the Accu-Keyer de* 
scribed in many issues of 
the ARRL Radio Amateur's 
Handbook, The oscillator 
part of this keyer is elimi- 
nated, A IO-H2 square wave 
derived from the frequency 
standard is connected in its 
place. This same 10 Hz is 
sent to the clock input of 
two D flip-flops: The Q out- 
put of one of these goes to 
the dot input of the keyer; 
the Q output of the other 
provides the dash input. 
The paddle (preferably a 
dual squeeze type) con- 
nects to the D inputs of the 
flip-flops Debouncing can 
be arranged by connecting 
a resistor from each paddle 
output to the keyer positive 
voltage and a capacitor 
from each paddle to 
ground. CMOS versions of 
the Accu-Keyer are easily 
constructed and they are 
advantageous. The result of 
this circuit modification is a 
keyer that follows the 
desired CCW timing cycle 
to perfection. 

Computerized keying is 
becoming increasingly pop- 
ular. Some commercial key- 
ers can be modified for the 
external timing and phasing 
required for CCW; others 
cannot W3QVC had hoped 
that his M-80 Morse pro- 
gram for his TRS-80 would 
be adaptable to CCW Al- 
though its keying speed can 
be fine tuned, its phase can- 
not be linked to the second- 
ary frequency standard As 
a result, with much that has 
been learned from volume 
4 of the Disassembled 
Handbook for the TRS-80 
mentioned in the bibliogra- 
phy, he is encouragingly en- 
gaged in the production of 
a machine language Morse 
program for the TRS-80 (ei- 
ther Model I or Model III} 
that can use external clock- 
ing derived from his fre- 
quency standard. 

Conclusion 

CCW is just beginning to 
make its mark in amateur 
radio communication. With 
all the technological ad- 
vances now at hand, there is 



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every reason to consider 
the possible usefulness of 
CCW in the VHF range. 
There is plenty of room for 
new experiments! ■ 

Bibliography 

Byrhans, R. W.r 

"If You Want To Krrow Where 
You Are: The MinhL Loran*C 
Receiver," 73 Magazine: Pari 
I, April, 1978; Part lU May, 
1978. 

Dfsassembfed Handbook for the 
TRS-80, Vol. 4, Richcraft Engi- 
neering, Chautauqua NY 14722, 
1981. 

Hewlett-Packard: Timekeeping 
and Frequency Calibration, Ap- 
plication Note 52-2, 1976. 

National Bureau of Standards: 
Davies, Kenneth: ionospher- 
ic Radio Propagation^ NBS 
Monograph 80. 1965. 
NBS Radio Stations. 
NBS Time and Frequency 
Bulletin. 

The New NBS Frequency 
Calibration Service. {On use 
of TV network colont>urst 
signals.) 

Time and Frequency Users' 
Manuai. NBS Technical Note 
695, 1977. 



Petit. Raymond a, W7GHM: 
"Coherent CW: Amateur Ra- 
dio's New State of the Art?", 
OS 7, September, 1975, p, 26, 
*' Frequency Synthesized Lo« 
cat Oscillator System for the 
High Frequency Amateur 
Bands/' Ham Radio, Octo- 
ber, 1 978. p. 60. 
^^ Phase-Locked 9*MHz BFO," 
Ham Radio, November, 1978, 
p, 49. 

"Phase- Locked Up-Convert- 
ef," Ham Radio, November, 
1979, p, 26. 

"Technical Topics.'* Radio Com- 
munication (RSGB), June, 1975, 
p. 462; July. 1976. p. 517, 

Weiss, Adrian, W8EEG: 

"Coherent CW— The CW of 

The Future?". CO: Part I, 

June, 1977, p. 24; Part II, July, 

1977, p. 48. 

^*QRP," CO, January, 1978, p. 

44. 

Woodson, Charles, W6NEY: 
"Coherent CW/' OS 7: Part 
I— "The Concept,** May, 
1981, p. 11; Part II— "The 
Practical Aspects," June, 
1981 , p. 18, 

"World of Amateur Radio," 
Wireiess World, March, 1975, 

73Magazfne • July, 1982 51 



Michael Wiodotph W90CK 
218 W. 2nd Street 
Chasfea MN 55373 



Electric Health via Negative Ions 

combatting an invisible menace 



Scientists studying "ill 
winds" have unearthed 
some amazing facts. First of 
all, there really are ill winds, 
air masses that produce 
nervous and physical symp- 



toms in weather-sensitive 
people. 

In our country, these 
symptoms have long been 
considered purely psycho- 
logical, or just in one's 




mind, but in other countries 
such as Germany and Isra- 
el they have long been re- 
lated to bad winds, the 
Foehn in Germany and the 
Sharan in Israel. 

Scientists have found 
that these air masses pro- 
duce measurable changes 
in our bloodstream. And 
they believe they have 
found out how. 

It seems that even before 
these winds sweep across 
an area, the positive ioniza- 
tion of the air increases 
enormously. In normal air. 



for every four negative ions 
there are five positive ions. 

These positive ions in 
some way seem to increase 
the serotonin in the blood. 
This is a hormone whose 
properties are just now be- 
ing investigated Already 
we know serotonin has a 
great deal to do with our 
nervous condition, our 
moods, etc. 

Before the ill winds 
come, the positive ioniza- 
tion of the air increases 
over 3000%. It's no wonder, 
then, that people can be af- 
fected. Doctors in Israel 



f aside the ion generator. Old hah dryer (without heating 
elemerjts) is used to disperse ions. 

52 73 Magazine • JyiyJ982 




Complete negative-ion producing and sensing system. 




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Fig. h Schemattc of negative-ion-sensing electroscope. 



often treat the nervous and 
physical ailments of their 
patients at these times by 
drugs that inhibit the action 
of serotonin, with almost 
magical results; moods 
change dramatically. 

In our country, we also 
have such ill winds: the San- 
ta Ana in California and the 
Chinook of the Rocky 
Mountains. You have per* 
haps experienced the exhil- 
arating effects of the air at 
the seashore, near a water- 
fall, or in the mountains. In 
such places, the negative 
ions predominate. 

As we become more and 
more "civilized/' we also 
live in more completely air- 
conditioned environments. 

This air-conditioning not 
only warms or cools the air, 
it often deprives it of most 
of its negative ions. Air pol- 
lution outside our homes 
has the same effect Tobac* 
CO smoke, besides being of- 
fensive to many noses, also 
depletes our working and 
living environments of neg- 
ative ions, thereby adding 
to our nervous tension, so 
we pull out another ciga- 
rette, compounding the 
felony. 

The mood we are in while 
we work is important. The 
Federal Aviation Admini- 
stration is even studying the 
possibility that the imbal- 
ance in positive/negative 
ion concentration in cock- 
pits may contribute to pilot 
error, resulting in danger- 
ous situations for all on a 
flight. 

This new knowledge of 
our environment and how it 
affects us has promoted the 



rise of several companies 
producing negative-ion gen- 
erators, on the theory that if 
we can change the ion bal- 
ance in our living or work- 
ing environment to favor 
the negative-ion concentra- 
tion, it will result in better 
feelings and better work, as 
well as help purify the air. 

Most of these companies 
are really trying to give us 

something for our money, 
but some do it better than 
others. Some ion generators 
produce mostly ozone, 
which is not the negative 
ions we want; in fact it has 
been found detrimental to 
health. 

Later in this article I will 
detail how you can build 
your own negative-ion gen- 
erator. But first we should 
have a way of telling wheth- 
er we are really getting neg- 
ative ions or positive ions or 
just ozone. We can't see 
any of these Ozone we can 
detect if our nose is in good 
functioning condition, but 
only our moods could tell 
us whether there are too 
many positive ions in our 
environment. 

So, although we can pro- 
duce our own negative ions, 
we need a method of de- 
tecting these helpful ions. 
What we need is a negative 
electroscope. You may be 
familiar with electroscopes 
used in high-school science 
classes, two- leaf affairs 
made of thin foil which sep- 
arates when electrostatic al- 
fy charged. The difficulty 
with these is that they will 
react to either a positive or 
a negative charge. So we 
still are in the dark as to 



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which ions we have gener- 
ated, if any. 

The Negative Electroscope 

Fig, 1 shows how to buifd 
a simple negal/ve electro- 
scope which reacts to a 

concentration of negative 
ions. As you may know 



from your knowledge of 
vacuum tubes, a negative 
charge on the grid of a tube 
prevents current from flow- 
ing in the tube. In this cir- 
cuit the grid is connected to 
a pick-up plate some five 
inches [13 cm) in diameter. 
When this plate is in a nega- 




Outside view of electroscope. 




I 



1 

I 



Inside the electroscope. 

73 Magazine • Juiy,1982 53 



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tive field [negative ions pro- 
duce a negative field), it 
places this negative charge 
on the grid of the tube and 
the neon bulb in the plate 
circuit goes out, showing 
that current in the tube has 
been cut off by a negative 
charge on the grid. 

Any triode tube nnay be 
used, or a multi-element 
tube with the screen grid 
connected to the plate (ig- 
nore other elements except 
fjiament, cathode, and 
grid). If the cabinet is made 
of wood or plastic, you 
don't need the isolation 
transformer. But be careful 
that no high voltage is on 
any external surface. 

I found an aluminum 
plate from a discarded per- 
colator to be about the 
right size. I mounted the 
neon bulb (with its resistor) 
in the ready-made hole in 
the center of this plate 
Then it was simple to 
mount a small filament 
transformer and the tube 

54 73Magazin0 • July, 1982 



socket to the back of this 
plate. I didn't use an isola- 
tion transformer as only the 
plate connected to the grid 
can be touched from out- 
side, and it has only the 
voltage of the surrounding 
air. 

Usually the neon bulb 
will be on because the or- 
dinary air conditions are 
positive, which allows some 
plate current to flow. 
Touching the plate will 
sometimes cause the neon 
to go out but more often 
than not it will light bright- 
er. You can experiment vv.ith 
this electroscope by comb- 
ing your hair and bringing 
the comb next to the plate 
or walking across the carpet 
towards the plate, As you 
will find, most of the static 
charges produced are of a 
positive polarity and will 
make the neon glow even 
:er. 



The Negative Ionizer 
To build the negative 



ionizer (Fig. 21 I bought a 
surplus 6-kV transformer, 
formerly used for a bug- 
killer. If you have an elec- 
tronic background and 
don't mind the size of your 
ionizer, there is an alterna- 
tive to a high-voltage trans- 
former. If you have an old 
working TV set, you could, 
with some wiring changes, 
bring out the negative high* 
voltage lead of your TV fly- 
back power supply and use 
it to generate your negative 
ions. The anode lead going 
to the picture tube is posi- 
tive. In front of the ordinary 
TV set you wilt find an over- 
abundance of positive ions. 
Perhaps this is partly the 
cause of our moody reac- 
tion to television! 

I used an ordinary 2AV2 
tube for rectifying the high 
voltage. If you have some 
very high-voltage diodes, 
these could be used, but 
they are not as tolerant of 
sparks and corona dis- 
charge as tubes are. 

Build the whole ionizer in 
a wooden or plastic case or 
insulate heavily— five or six 
kilovolts is lethal! The extra 
lOmegohm resistor (actual- 
ly three 3.5M resistors) is in 
the positive lead to ensure 
that anyone coming into ac- 
cidental contact with the 
cathode, or negative-ion 
lead, will not be seriously 
shocked- According to 
Ohm's Law, this 10M resis- 
tance would allow about 
0.7 mA of current to flow 
You probably get much 
more than this in the thou- 
sand-volt shock you get by 
walking across the carpet 
and touching someone. 

Despite this 10M precau- 
tion» shield the negative-ion 
point or cluster as well as 
possible from prying fin- 
gers Be sure to keep the 
whole apparatus out of 
reach of children alto- 
gether. The shock that one 
can get from this ionizer is 
not serious but could easily 
produce a jerk of the arm 
that could upset and knock 
down the ionizer with more 
serious consequences. As 



when you open the back of 
your TV set the best advice 
is: Don't! And the next best 
is: Know what you are doing 
and be careful! 

The capacitor 1 used to 
store up the 6-kV charge 
was the 015-/iF capacitor 
that came with the bug- 
killer To build a better 
charge, a higher capacity 
could be used here (but be 
sure it is a high- voltage 
type). With the 6 kV, 1 had 
some trouble with arcing 
and corona discharge at the 
tube socket. ThelOM resis- 
tor helped reduce this, and 
some anti-corona spray 
made it manageable. The 
corona discharge usually 
produces positive ions, so it 
is undesirable, 

I first made the negative 
discharge element a point 
(afiled-down iron nail), but 
later added some extra 
points to increase the dis- 
charge. Perhaps you would 
like to use a piece of copper 
mesh such as is used in 
cleaning utensils. In any 
case, try to shield this in 
some way or keep it out of 
reach of children. 

I found the 6-kV bug- 
killer transformer had 
enough space to wind a few 
extra turns on, to light up 
the filament of the 2 AV2, If 
you can't do this or decide 
to use another rectifier, a 
separate transformer could 
be used for the filament 
One advantage to using a 
high-voltage diode would 
be the saving of this extra 
transformer, 

I also enclosed in my box 
an old hair-dryer blower 
(the heating element had 
burned out). In series with 
this I connected a 10-W re- 
sistor to slow it down a bit. 
In this way I had a slight 
breeze blowing up out of 
the ionizer to disperse the 
negative ions generated 
But this is a refinement that 
may not be necessary. 

"An ill wind blows no one 
good'' says an old adage. 
Build this ionizer and be 

prepared to combat this in- 
visible menace. ■ 



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Well, for openers, we've 
got four aces: 



• It works. (Slicker than a 

politician on the day before 
election.) 

• The price. (How does 
less than $10 sound?) 

• Adjustable bandpass. 
(Continuously adjustable 
from less than 30 Hz to full- 
open. That represents a Q 
of 25 down to a Q of 
nothing.) 

• It's simple {You can 
build it in less than an hour 
You don't have to under- 
stand — just follow the pic- 
tures and the instructionsj 



LM324 




Fig. 1, 



So if you're tired of 
crackles, pops, roars, whis- 
tles, and worse yet, interfer- 
ing stations, this is the 
gadget for you. You can 
dial them out almost like 
magici 

The filter uses only one 
integrated circuit, the 
LM-324 quad op amp, 
which is available at Radio 
Shack for about SI. 50. Also 
required are some resistors 
and capacitors, a speaker, 
and a power supply [bat- 
teries will do], [f you'd 
rather travel by Cadillac 
than skateboard, add a 
phone jack and construct a 
power supply as shown in 
Fig. 3. 

The design is nothing 
new — as a matter of fact, it 
is based on a filter design 
shown in the spec sheet for 
the LM-324. We have added 
to the design to provide for 
an adjustable bandpass, 
and we have tried to write 
simple directions for con- 
struction. Those who are ex- 
perienced builders are not 
likely to need or follow our 
instructions, so we are 
writing for the person who 
has never, ever even seen 
an integrated circuit 



Decisions^ 
Decisions, Decisions 

OK, if you are convinced 
that you can live no longer 
with QRM and QRN, it's 
time to make some deci- 
sions. 

(a) What kind of cabinet? 
How about a cigar box; 
maybe a small plastic box; 
or try one of those smalt 
metal card-file boxes from 
the stationery counter at 
Wooico 

(b) Chassis — Experienced 
builders will probably use | 
perfboard or printed cir- | 
cuits, but beginners will 
probably do better with a 
small piece of plywood, 
about 3" X 5". Use small 
nails for terminals or tie- 
points, preferably soldered. 

(c) Power supply— The 
operating voltage can be 
anything from 5 to 14 volts. 
The unit draws 120 mA at 9 
volts. An ordinary 9-voit 
transistor radio battery will 
give about 4 hours con- 
tinuous service, but four C 
or D cells in series wrll last 
several hours longer; (Later 
we will discuss the elimina- 
tion of the transistor post- 
amplifier. Without the tran- 
sistor, the unit draws only 



73 Magazine • July, 1932 



10 mA at 9 volts. Your bat- 
tery would last a long time 
assuming you remember to 
turn off the power when the 
jnit is not in use.) 

If you opt to construct a 
power supply to operate 
from house current try the 
one in Fig. 3. If s simple and 
inexpensive. 

(d) Phones, speaker, or 
both? — The design shows a 
speaker within the unit, but 
if you feel you might want 
to use phones, install a 
phone jack Sorry, we can't 
draw a picture for this; 
there are just too many 
types of phone jacks. Con- 
sider, though, that the out- 
put of the filter is at a con- 
stant volume regardless of 
the input. Many times you 
will hear a signal at full 
volume that you cannot 
hear at all with the unaided 
ear You don't have to de- 
pend on phones to pick out 
the weak ones. 

(e) Center frequency— 
This unit should have a 
center frequency (in its 
sharpest mode) of about 
700 Hz. That is, if ca- 
pacitors CI and C2 are ac- 
tually 0.1 uF. Unfortunate- 
ly, capacitors are flighty 
things; the actual capaci* 
tances are almost never 
the same as the marked 
capacitances So, "ye pays 
yer money, and ye takes 
yer chances;^' More like- 
ly, the center frequency 
will be about 5% to 10% 
below the designed center 
frequency. If you would 
like a different center fre- 
quency, the Design Notes 
give alternative component 
values. 

About Construction 

The LM-324 looks like a 
fat centipede. Pins are 
numbered counterclock- 
wise beginning to the left of 
the notch when viewed 
from the top. (Remember, 
George, that's clockwise 
when viewed from the bot- 
tom or pin side) Most ICs 
also have a small dot mark- 
ing pin 1. If this is your first 
IC project, invest six bits in 
a 14-pin wire-wrap IC sock- 



50-I9O 




J rt 



/fr 



VOLUME 



/ft 



Fig. Z 



et (that's the one with the 
long pins). It'll save a lot of 
cussing— believe it! 

The bandpass control 
(RT) may be 50k to 100k 
Ohms. The filtering is 
sharpest when R1 is set at a 
high resistance, and when 
R1 is very low, the bandpass 
is so wide it seems there is 
no filter at all. When R1 is 
at 80k Ohms or higher, the 
bandpass is less than 4% of 
the center frequency, which 
is too narrow for ordinary 
CW use. Most noise disap- 
pears when R1 is set at 
about 30k Ohms, and a set- 
ting of 50k Ohms will nar- 
row the bandpass to less 
than 40 Hz. 

Make your connections 
to the power switch (SI) so 
that when the power is off, 
the signal is bypassed 
around the unit direct to 
the speaker. See the illustra- 
tion in Fig. 1. 

The transistor used as a 
post-amplifier needs to 
have a power dissipation 
rating of better than 1.5 
Watts. The2N2222 can han- 
dle this, but if you substi- 
tute another NPN, check it 
after a couple of minutes of 
use to see if it is heating too 
much. You may control this 
by putting 50 to 150 Ohms 
resistance between the plus 
voltage terminal and the 
collector of the transistor. 
(This is shown in the draw- 
ing as R11. Naturally, if the 
transistor you use can han- 
dle the power without over- 
heating, you may eliminate 

Rir) 



PARTS LIST 
(All resistors V4 Watt) 

R1 50k Ohm to 100k Ohm variable resistor 

R2, R8 100k Ohms 

R3 100 Ohms 

R4, R6 56k Ohms 

R5 120k Ohms 

R7 180k Ohms 

R9 5.6k Ohms 

RIO ISk Ohms 

R1 1 50 to 150 Ohms (see text) 

R12 500 Ohm variable resistor 

C1 , 02 ,1 uF 

C3 10 uF 

C4 1000 uF 

01 2K2222 or equivafent NPN transistor (see text) 

IC1 LM'324 quad op amp integrated circuit 

81 Double-throw, double-pote slide switch 

Small speaker 

Battery (see text) 

For optional power supply see Fig. 3, 

IC socket 14-pin wire wrap 



1 



The LM324 filter pro- 
duces reasonable volume 
into a small speaker 

without further amplifica- 
tion. If your shack is not 
noisy, simply connect one 
leg of your speaker to pin 7 
of the LM-324 and eliminate 
transistor Q1 and also 
resistors RIO, R11, and R12, 
The volume will then be 



enough to be heard clearly 
from a distance of 10 to 15 
feet. (Remember the weak 
signals sound just as loud as 
the strong ones,) 

Using the Filter 

Connect the input of the 
filter to the phone jack or 

external speaker connec- 
tions of your rig. Turn R1 to 





Design Notes 










Desired Center Frequency 




Component 


710 Hz SI 6 Hz 850 Hz 


1020 Hz 




R4, R6 


56k 


51k 47k 


39k 




R2(R4 X 1.5) 


82k 


75k 72k 


62k ' 




R3 (R4/623) 


91 


62 75 


62 




R5 


120k 


100k 100k 


100k 




R7 (R4 X 3) 


160k 


150k 150k 


120k 




R8 


100k 


100k 100k 


100k 




R9 


5,6k 


5.6k 5.6k 


5.6k 




(Computed to nearest standard va!ues— R4 and R6 are con- 




sidered critical. 


Other values may vary up to 25%,) 








73 Magazine • 


July. 1982 57 






iiB 




Fig, 3. Simple power supply. D1-D4 can be almost any 
diodes, or use full-wave bridge (Radio Shack 276-1167). 



The Saturn V is a deep ffinge microwave receiver tor homeowners 

that are ouiside of the service area of local pay TV stations (ie,, 

HBO. Showtime). It is fK^rnially used within line of sight of a tfans- 

mining lower in a 50 mile range and is simply attached to your TV 

anienna mast. Ttiis unit is completely ready to install mcluding all 

cable and mounting hardware, ft is designed to be Installed by the 

homeowner, 

We accept MasterCharge & Visa. 




455S Auburn Blvd.. Suite 208 

Sacramento, California 95341 (916) 454-2190 ^?2 



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its lowest resistance setting. 
With the power on, you can 
hear both the desirable and 
undesirable as you tune 
across the band. When you 
have located the signal you 
want, narrow the filter by 
adjusting Rl , bandpass con- 
trolp until the undesirable is 
eliminated. (You may have 
to slightly retune your 
receiver as you tighten 
down on the filter, but 
you'll soon learn to recog- 
nize the center frequency 
and tuning will be fast and 
easy.) Keep the volume of 
the receiver as low as possi* 



ble. If you get a chug-a- 
chug sound, you're using 
too much volume. Remem- 
ber, the filter will pick up 
some signals when the vol- 
ume is turned so low you 
can't hear them ordinarily. 
We've tried to keep it 
simple — so if you're too 
tired to build this yourself, 
give this article and the 
parts to one of the kids.H 

Editor's IStote 

Shortly before pyblicaticn. 73 
learned that R5 should be 
changed to 68k for best perfor- 
mance, Please note this change. 



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58 73 Magazine • July J 982 




''BRAND NEW 

CHAMPION MESSAGE 
MEMORY KEYER 

Model TE-292 





Features: 

« Si3feof the Arf-CMOS Cfrcmtry 

m Chotce of Message Siorage^ 
•A Sfx 50 characJBf messages 
*&. Jwetve 25 character mss sages 
•C. 2? combtnafions of mtssage 
C progfammmg. 

Records ai sny spee^-pf^ys 9i any speed. 

^MefT^Ofy opefatmg LED 

muse fct tiatfy QSO or contests 



PLUS: 



Sett compfefmg dots and hashes 

Bcfh dot arid dash memory 

tarrtbtc Keying i/vtth any SQueet^ naddif 

5-50 ^ p m 

Spe0(i, vofume, rone, tune snd vatnghi conuois 

Bidetone and speaker 

Low cuneni dram CMOS battery ppefation — portabh: 

Rear p^nei Jack tar auxiUnry po^er 

Oefuxe guanet-mch lacks far k^ytrrg and output 

Keys grtd biock snd sohd ngs 

Mm£D AND TESTia fUUY GUARANrBBD—LESS 

Rd TTfRV 



$ 89.95 



Features: 



Model Tt'284 



a 



Stale of the- An CMOS Circaitty 
Three ctiofces of Message Storage 
-A. Two iW character eac^f 
message storage 
Four (25 character each} 
messs^ge storage 
»C One 50 character and 
two 25 characfer message 
siorage 
'Re<:ofds at ariy speed ptays 9f 
ar%y speeO 

' Memory operatiffg LED 
^Use tor dmiy QSO or contests 





VOLUME 

PLUS: 

mSeff compleimg dots and dashes 

• Both dot and dash memory 

• idrrit>tc Keying with any squeeie paddie 
9 5-30 w p m 

9 Speed. )/oiume. tone, tune and ^aght controfs 

• Stdeton^ and speaker 

mioM cvrr^nt dram CMOS tatietv opera f ion — portable 

• Dfitune quartertnch facks for keytng and output 
m Keys gftd t>iock and sotid ngs 

m \AflRBD AND rf ST£D fULL Y GUARANTEED-LESS 
BATTBRy 



MESSAGE 
MEMORY KEYER 



F««cyr««£ 



• Advanced Cf/OS messaije fliew£j/y 
« Two itO char eachs mesidffe 

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at §rt^ speeiS 

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5 50 wpm 



Spited, wetght. tone, voiume tune controfs & stdetone and 

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Depute quarter inch lacks for keying and output 

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Wtf^ and tested — tufty gvaranteed—fe&s battery 



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The True-Blue Keyer 

its speed readout doesn't lie 



Editor s Note: The 8044 kayer chip used hore is available from Curtis Electro Devices, Box 4090, Moufitain View CA 94040; telephone 
(415)-964*384€, 



This article describes a 
project that started as a 
typical electronic keyer 
and ended up including a 
self-contained readout that 
displays words per minute 
(wpm), This keyer is unique 
because of its ability to dig- 
itally display the speed in 
wpm of the keyer IC before 
either the dot or dash pad- 
dle is closed. Additionally, 
tt will display the sender's 
speed in wpm during a CW 
transmission. These fea- 
tures were designed into 
the project using all CMOS 
technology and mechanical 
coupling between the keyer 
and image clocks. 

The project features 
common keyer controls 
such as speed, volume, tone. 



weight, sidetoneon/off, and 
transmitter tune with added 
front-panel switches for dis- 
play calibrate and image/ 
keyer display 

Circuit Operation 

The use of a calibrated, 
tracking image clock is the 
circuit's simple method of 
generating a clock frequen- 
cy when there is no clock 
output from the keyer IC, as 
in a standby condition. 
When the operator starts 
sending CW with the pad 
dies, the logic circuitry 
transfers the wpm display 
from reading the image 
clock to reading the keyer 
clock. The display is up- 
dated every 1.2 seconds 
and will show the correct 




Dhpfa y keyer, 

60 73Magaiine • July, 1982 



wpm after the first two up- 
date periods. A lower CW 
speed than the preset level 
will register if the operator 
is not sending at the proper 
rate and with the correct 
spacings. This feature pro- 
vides visual feedback, tell- 
ing the operator if his fist 
needs some correction. The 
display will never show a 
wpm level in excess of the 
preset value no matter how 
fast the paddles are ac- 
tuated because the counter 
records only the number of 
clock pulses for 1 .2 seconds 
generated by a particular 
frequency (speed) selected 
by the speed control 

Upon completion of the 
last CW character and, 
hence, the last keyer clock 
pulse, the display will show 
a reduced wpm or even 
zero for a short interval. 
Again, the logic functions 
and the display shows the 
output of the image clock. 

Circuit Description 

The display keyer can 
best be described by sepa- 
rating it into three sub-cir- 
cuits. The block diagram of 
Fig. 1 shows these circuits in 
their simplest form for 
those interested in follow* 
ing the logic sequence. 

The heart of the system is 
the 8044 IC, This sub-circuit 



is shown in Fig. 2. General- 
ly, I used the published cir* 
cuit* with a few modifica- 
tions. As shown in Fig. 2, 
these mods were not major 
circuit changes but just use 
of what the 8044 had to of- 
fer. For instance, the dot 
and dash terminals (pins 2 
and 7) are normally high 
during standby This was 
used very conveniently to 
drive the Exclusive NOR, 
U4a, a CD4077. Another 
connection to pin 8 of the 
8044 was used for clock f re- 
quency pick-off to drive the 
counter and display circuit 
(Fig. 4) via an FET bilateral 
switch, U5a, ^|4 of a 
CD4066. 

Another switch, U5c, was 
wired to the base of the 
2N1613 driver transistor. 
This FET switch grounds 
the base of the driver tran- 
sistor when U4b, pin 11 
{Fig. 3), is high, thereby pre- 
venting the transistor from 
being keyed during clock 
calibration. 

The output keying tran* 
sistor, a 2N4356, is config- 
ured to drive a grid-block 
input circuit. Choice of this 
transistor will depend on 
your transceiver's grid- 

'8044 Keyer Data Sheet, Curtis 
Electro Devices, Inc., revised 
February 23, 1979. 



Diock voltage My HW-101 
presents --50 V dc at the 
key jack, so this transistor 
mih its BVceo of 80 V dc 
has an adequate margin. 

The final mod to the key* 
ar circuit was the addition 
Df the dual, 500k singte- 
5 haft pot The keyer clock is 
controlled by RIA, while 
R1 B (Fig, 3) controls the im* 
age clock frequency. Use of 
this dual pot mechanically 
couples the two clocks to- 
gether to provide proper 
tracking and the correct 
IVpm display during stand- 
by conditions. 

The second sub-circuit is 
shown in Fig. 3 Alt of the 
switching and timing func- 
tions are controlled by this 
circuit. The positions of FET 
switches U5a and U5b as 
well as SW1 and SW2 are in 
a standby, ready-to-trans- 
mit mode. The logic states 
of the CD4077 that are 
useful for this circuit 
are L + L^H, H + H = H. 
H + L = L. The following 
logic states exist for Fig, 3 
as shown. U4a pins 1 and 2 
are high, thus pin 3 is high. 
U4c pin 6 is high and pin 5 is 
low, thus pin 4 is low. U2 is 
wired as a positive retrigger- 
able monostable. With U2 
pins 8 and 12 low, pin 10 
will be low. U4d pins 8 and 
9 are low, thus pin 10 is 
high, U4b pin 12 is high and 
pin 13 is low, thus pin 11 is 
low and U5c is open. 

During standby condi- 
tions, the image clock, U3, 
wired as a free-running 
astabte has its output pin 10 
routed to the counter via 
the closed bilateral FET 
switch, U5b, 

When a dot or dash pad- 
dle is closed, U4a's input 
state will become either 
L + H = L or H + L=L As 
you can see, U4a's output 
will be forced low in either 
case. This low is inverted by 
the controlled inverter, 
U4c, whose positive output 
triggers U2. U2's mono- 
stable pulse width is set 
to four seconds by the 1 
meg and I^F RC combina- 
tion. This pulse width was 



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Fig, 2. Keyer and output circuits. 



selected to acconnmodate 
low-speed operation, which 
may include long pauses. 
If the pause is greater than 
the pulse width, the display 
will revert back to the im- 
age clock. As long as this 
condition exists, the display 
will continue to show ran- 
dom numbers as it bounces 
between the two clock out- 
puts. U2 pin 10 wilt remain 
high for positive retrigger 
pulses arriving at its input 
within the four*$econd on- 
time. U4d pin 8 now re- 
mains high, which forces 



pin 10 low and opens U5b. 
The high on U2 pin 10 also 
controls U5a, causing this 
switch to close and rout- 
ing the 8044's clock output 
to the counter and display 
circuit The display now 
registers the wpm of the 
transmitted CW up to the 
maximum set by the speed 
control 

The logic transfers just 
described will remain in ef- 
fect until there is a pause 
greater than four seconds. 
Upon completion of the 
last paddle closure, either a 



dot or a dash, U2 is retrig- 
gered for its last cycle. 
After four seconds, all logic 
states will revert back to 
the standby condition, with 
the display showing the im- 
age clock wpm. During this 
transition, the display may 
show a double-zero indica- 
tion because there is no 
clock output from the 8044 
and U2 has not returned to 
zero on pin 10, closing U5b 
and opening U5a. 

The image clock, U3, 
uses Rib for setting the 
clock output on pin 10. 

73MagazinG • July, 1 982 61 



I 



Real is a 100k multhturn 
trim pot required to cali- 
brate the image clock so 
that it will properly track 

with the 8044 clock. 

Fig. 4 shows the third sub- 
circuit the counter and dis- 
play Credit for this circuit 
goes to Howard F. Batie 
W7BBX whose fine article, 
"QRQ. QRS-By the Num- 
bers/' appeared in the lune, 
1980, issue of 7J Magazine, 
The circuit description is 
throughly covered in this 



article, so further explana- 
tion would just duplicate 
his effort, 

Dc power for all circuits 
is produced by an internal 
regulated power supply 
(Fig. 5), The 7808 three-ter- 
minal fl-V dc regulator was 
selected because it pro- 
vides at least two volts of 
Vdd margin for the 8044 IC, 
This IC is rated forlOVdc 
maximum while all other 
CMOS used have a 20-V dc 
rating. The 7808 is rated for 



1 Ampere steady-state load 
The circuits in this project 
can draw 200 mA, which is 
well within the 7808 rating, 
but the regulator must be 
bolted to a heat sink or it 
will destroy itself. The regu- 
lator's mounting tab is its 
ground terminal and there- 
fore can be electrically at- 
tached to the chassis. 

Calibration 

The following descrip- 
tion is based on all switches 



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Fig, 3. Display sequencing logic. 



positioned as shown in Figs. 
2, X and 4 and the paddles 
are open. 

After ac power is applied, 
I suggest a warm-up time of 
five minutes. If all circuits 
are working properly, the 
display should indicate a 
twodigit number. 

The 8044 IC is capable of 
8 to 50 wpm with the values 
shown. The image clock 
was calibrated using Real 
and a speed setting of 30 
wpm. This provides track- 
ing within 1 to 2 wpm from 
8 to 30, Above 30 wpm, I ex- 
perienced difficulty in get* 
ting proper tracking be* 
cause of nontinearitjes in 
the image clock. If the 
speed control is advanced 
above 30, the image display 
will increase very rapidly 
and show a false number. 
At these higher speeds, with 
the paddles open, a mo- 
mentary indication of the 
correct speed is available 
when the front-panel clock 
switch is transferred to the 
8044 position. During CW 
transmission, the display 
will read correctly for any 
speed over 30 wpm. 

SW1 is an SPDT spring-re- 
turn switch used during cal- 
ibration of the image clock 



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62 73 Magazine • July, 1962 



to match the 8044 clock. 
When SW1 is closed, the 
high on U4b pin 12 via the 
10k pull-up resistor is 
grounded. This does two 
things: First, the 8044 is 
turned on through the 
1N914 between U4a pin 2 
and U4b pin 12. Second, 
U4b pin 11 goes high, which 
closes U5c, preventing any 
transmitter keying during 
clock calibration. The im- 
age clock could be calibrat- 
ed by simply closing the dot 
paddle, but this is not rec- 
ommended because the 
transmitter would be keyed 
unnecessarily. 

SW2 is a standard DPDT 
toggle switch used to 
change the logic state on 
U4d pin 9 for counter peri- 
od calibration. A high 
on pin 9 and a low on pin 8 
will force U4d pin 10 low 
and open switch U5b. With 
switches U5a and U5b 
open, the counter input 
is open and ready to ac- 
cept the 6O-H2 calibration 
signal. 

The counter circuit cali- 
bration uses SW2b to con- 
nect U6b pin 4 to the input 
of U6d pin 9, The remaining 
counter and display circuit- 
ry was used as it appeared 
in WZBBX^s article. 

The first calibration step 
is to set the period, or gat- 
ing time, of the frequency 
Counter. This time period is 
controlled by adjusting R4 
in Fig. 4 Incidentally, I rec- 
ommend that a multi-turn 
trim pot be used for R4 to re- 
duce the sensitivity of this 
adjustment. The calibration 
source is a low-voltage 
60-Hz signal from the trans- 
former secondary With 60 
Hz and a 1.2-second gating 



period, the wpm calculates 
to be 72, Therefore, with the 
front- panel Calibrate 
switch [SW2) up, R4 should 
be varied until a steady 
reading of 72 registers on 
the display. Remember to 
rotate R4 slowly, allowing 
the counter to count all the 
pulses during the gating 
time. When this step is com- 
plete, return SW2 to the 
down position. 

The second calibration 
step involves setting the 
output frequency of the im- 
age clock to coincide with 
the 8044 clock at 30 wpm. 
Pressing the front-panel 
Clock switch (SW1 ) presents 
the 8044's clock to the 
counter/display circuit and 
registers it directly in wpm. 
The idea here is to adjust 
the 100k trimpot, Real (Fig 
3), so the image clock 
matches the 8044 clock. 
Next, release SW1 and ad- 
just Real for the correct 
wpm. Rotate the Speed 
control (R1A/B) counter- 
clockwise and check for 
proper tracking at lower 
settings. 

This completes the cali- 
bration for the display key- 
er and only leaves the re- 
maining keyer controls, 
which are self-explanatory. 

Component layout isn't 
critical. For ease of fabrica- 
tion and checkout, I con- 
structed the counter/dis- 
play circuits on one perf- 
board and the keyer with 
switching/timing logic on 
another. The power supply 
is mounted to a third perf- 
board with the 7808 near 
the center. The regulator's 
metal heat sink is connect- 
ed to the rear chassis wall 

The display keyer project 



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was fun to design and build 
and with its completion has 
added another dimension 
to my CW operation. The 
usefulness of the wpm read- 
out has proved to be more 
than expected, with its corv 
stant reminder of CW 
speed. Besides being useful 



on the air, the project 
makes an excellent CW 

practice machine. The 
trainee can develop and im- 
prove both his speed and 
coordination using the dis- 
play and sidetone as indica- 
tions of his sending 
quality. ■ 




'See Ltst &f Ad^fttsers on f^ge 1 14 



Top view of the display keyBr, showing the three pert- 

boards. Speaker, ac fuse, input and output jacks are on the 
rear panel. 

73M&gaifne • July, 1982 69 



Lours C. Grat/e K&TT 
624 C^mpbeH H'tU Rd 
Bowiing Green OH 434Q2 



Touch-Type CW 

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e4 73 Magazine • July J 982 



I have been looking for a 
good program to make it 
possible for me to use my 
TRS-80 compyter to send 
CW over the air, I wrote 
this one, with the following 
features: 

• The transmitter is keyed 
through the cassette aux- 
iliary plug and does not use 
the TRS-80 relay. 

• Input and output speeds 
are independent so that you 
can type well ahead of 
what is being transmitted. 

• The output speed can be 
increased or decreased at 
any time by holding the 



shift key and pressing the 

up or down arrow key. 

• The input is displayed on 
the screen and can be ed- 
ited before it is sent out by 

using the backspace key, 

• The character being out- 
put is indicated by being 
removed temporarily from 
the CRT display, with the 
dots and dashes displayed 
in its place as they are 
sent. Afterwards the char- 
acter is replaced. This goes 
on simultaneously with the 
addition of new characters. 
You always know exactly 
where the sending routine is 
operating. 



• Messages can be typed 
out on the screen, edited, 
and then stored for later 
output. When called, the 
entire message is instantly 
placed on the screen in the 
proper sequence and is 
treated exactly like text you 
are typing. 

• Hitting the break key will 
clear the screen and the 
buffers and stop the output. 

• The output is perfect 
machine code of whatever 
is put on the CRT, including 
proper spaces. 

Operation 

Using Edtasm or Tbug, 



make an object program 
tape and load it Operation 
is extremely simple Just 
start typing and anything 
you type will be displayed 
and sent. 

If you want a faster out- 
put speed, hold the shift 
key and press the up arrow 
key. Each time you do this, 
the speed is incremented. 
To decrease the speed, use 
the down arrow key in the 
same way. 

To store a message for 
later use, first press the @ 
key and then key 1, 2. 3, or 
4. Type in your message Cup 
to 256 characters), edit it, 



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0A#tr iA0a-l5MP»l - 5iB-3ffWPtl 




1 CLEAR SFAC£ HAEIEH 






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1 
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XDR 


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73 


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AND 


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2001 


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SET 








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AND 


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on 


BC^C€i>E 

73 Magazine • July, 1982 


65 



I 




4tV 



4V KEF -• |^ 



V IN » 



I OK 



^200 



TO Kit lACK 



and after it appears on the 
screen just as you want it, 
press enter to store it. Up to 
four different messages can 
be stored. 

When you want to send 
the stored message, hold 




2N2222 



Fig ^ 



the shift key and press 1 . 2, 
3, or 4 according to which 
message you want. The en- 
tire message will appear on 
the screen immediately af- 
ter anything you have al- 
ready typed in and will be 



sent in proper sequence 
when the output program 
gets to it. 

Whenever you want to 
kilt the output, hit the break 
key and you can start over. 

The Program 

The keyscan (02 BH) sub- 
routine in the ROM monitor 
contains a 17-millisecond 
delay. I had to rewrite this 
and put it in this program 
without that delay. Other- 
wise, typing in characters 
would mess up the output 
timing. Also, you will notice 
that I have used the key- 
scan subroutine as the ma- 



jor part of the timing loops 
for output of code. This is 
the trick that makes it ap- 
pear that output and input 
are independent. 

The output cursor is 
stored at 5000 H and ad- 
justed as necessary by using 
index addressing. The input 
cursor is handled by the 
monitor program. 

The message routmes 
were greatly simplified by 
making use of the subrou- 
tine in the monitor at 40H. 
All I had to do was put the 
start of the message buffer 
in HL. The subroutine then 
stores the message and 



4Ci4 


3C 


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IMG 


A 






4CI5 


31Sttl 


I3§li 


CODE 


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BL,0050H 






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4F 


t3f2l 




Ut 


C,A 






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99 


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t355» 




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BC,tlB 






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CD«ltt 


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CP 


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CB 


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il$30 
03640 

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MESSAGE ROUTIITE 






4 CI A 


CDlBee 


03660 


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CALL 


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4C1D 


67 


03671 




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03740 




CP 


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|HES£AG£ i 37 




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t375t 




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I, Ml 






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03760 




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;Jte£SACE i 4f 




4C3I 


2e3« 


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A 


1,H4 






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C3tt4A 


03710 




JP 


START 


I RESTART IF WD MESS 


t 


IC3S 


nttsi 


03741 


la 


1^ 


HL^SIOOB 


fMl DUFFER 




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cmift 


03100 




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40H 


flitPUT NEG8AGE 




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7a 


03810 




VD 


A*B 


fG£t i tBARS IN Ml 




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03t30 




INC 


A 






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331251 


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m 


(50a2HKA 


p STORE IT 




4C41 


3Gii 


03151 




W 


{UD^O 


thhST BYTE 




4C43 


C3B4i4A 


tJ9B9 




3P 


START 


^Ml EHTBSEO 




4C4« 


211152 


■ 3&70 


H2 


LD 


HL,52B0H 


lH2 BUFFER 




4C49 


CD40ii 


11880 




CALL 


40 H 


lIIfFDT ME^^AGB 




4C4C 


78 


■ 1S90 




LA 


A,B 


JGET 1 CBARB IN M2 




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A 






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(500391, A 


f STORE It 




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3£it 


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04020 




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START 






4C«e 


210054 


04030 


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HL,5488H 






4C6& 


CD40B0 


84848 




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41H 






4C££ 


78 


04858 




LO 


A, El 






4C6F 


BF 


04068 




LD 


Ith 






4C7fl 


3C 


04078 




IHC 


A 






4^?! 


3205^i 


04t8e 




LO 


(SieSHUA 






IC74 


3eBi 


04098 




LO 


fSLKB 






4C16 


C3tft4A 


04108 

04118 


* 


JP 


STARS 










04110 


;H£5SA{;e SCMI^iriG POCTTIliS 






4C19 


C5 


14130 


II£S1 


PUSH 


SC 






4C1A 


D5 


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PUSH 


DE 






IC7A 


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04150 




LD 


B.i 


fFlX BC COUJTTER 




4C70 


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LD 


A, {5i02a) 


rCET 1 OF CHARS 




4Cil 


4F 


04170 




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fSC-l or CHARS 




4C81 


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4ca2 


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fTae □ EST I SAT ION 




4Ce3 


2 lit 51 


84 218 




LD 


HL, 510111 


;M1 BUFF SOURCE 




4CSG 


CS 


84210 




pysH 


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4C89 


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jGBT t OP CHARS 




iC&h 


IB 


14 240 




DBC 


XiE 


J ADJUST BUFFER 




icae 


D5 


84258 




FUSH 


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4cec 


Bl 


84 16 ft 




POP 


BL 


fȣW FRONT BUFF 




4C8D 


E5 


84 270 




PUSH 


BL 


jSAVE IT 




4C8E 


D0212i4B 


04280 




LD 


IX,4B28H 


1 CURSOR 




4C92 


DDSEIB 


04298 




LP 


E, ax+11 


lis DCSTlHATtQN 




*C§^ 


DDSetl 


04310 




LD 


o,ax+n 






4c9a 


21tt5l 


04 310 




LD 


ffL,510tB 


jMi BOfr SOUHCE 




4C$B 


tB 


04320 




Die 


BiC 






4Ct€ 


Eset 


04330 




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jpBiwT m 




4C9E 


D073it 


04348 




LO 


( 11-^0), E 


tSA^fE CUHSOR 




4CA1 


DSTatI 


84350 




LD 


(1X+1J,D 







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4CA5 
4CA6 
4CA7 
4CA9 
'ICA? 
4CAA 
ICAC 
ICAF 
4CB0 
JCBl 
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B5 
4CB6 

4CBB 
4CB9 
4CBA 
4CBE 
4CBC 
4CBD 
4CC1 
4CC4 
4CC7 
4CCA 
4CCB 
4CCD 
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4C03 
4CD4 
4CD5 
4CD6 
4CD7 
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4C1>» 
4CDB 
4CDE 
4CDf 
4CE1 
4C£i 
4CE4 
4CES 
4CE7 
4C£B 
4CI9 
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4CEB 
4CEC 
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4CP6 
4CFS 
4CPA 
4CFC 

4crF 

4002 
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4084 
4D1S 
4006 
4D87 
4008 
4D8A 
4O0D 
4D0E 
4D1F 
4010 
4011 
4014 
4D16 
4Dlir 
to IS 
4D19 
4D1A 
4D1S 
4D1F 
4022 
4025 
403B 
40 2 » 
402B 
402E 
4031 
4032 
4031 
4D34 
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til 

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ei 

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DD^E00 
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21ieS4 

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EDB8 

OD7380 

007281 

El 

01 

CI 

c» 



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•43 00 
04400 
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84420 
04410 
84440 
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84488 
84498 
04508 
84 518 
84520 
14^38 
84540 
14551 
84568 
04578 
14 518 
04590 
04400 
04610 
04620 
04630 
04640 
04650 
04660 
84670 
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04690 
04700 
04710 
04720 
04730 
04740 
047 58 
04760 
84170 
847 80 
147 H 
14100 
14 611 
14120 
84 830 
84 840 
14850 
84 860 
14670 
84680 
84^98 
04988 
84918 
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04950 
•4060 
14970 
84 900 
14990 
15010 
15011 
15020 
85031 
15040 
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05060 
05071 
05888 
85090 
85100 
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05128 
05130 
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05150 
05161 
05170 
05180 
85190 
1S210 
15Z10 



M£S2 



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LD 


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KL.5200B 


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BC 


LDin 




POP 


BC 


DEC 


OE 


PUSH 


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NL 


PUSH 


ilL 


tD 


IXt4020B 


LD 


£*(IX+0) 


LO 


D,tIX+l} 


LD 


KLr52B0B 


0£C 


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LDIR 




LD 


tix+t)«e 


Ui 


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PU&B 


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im 


B,l 


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A,{5084H} 


LD 


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HLp53|8B 


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4A00a 



01100 TtyrAL ERRORS 



66 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



Capable of communication rotes to 300 baud, the 
TU-300 is designed specifically for modern high- 
speed and standard RTTY applications. The 
TLI-300 operates with standard microcompu- 
ter, TTYand radio equfpment and is 
TTL and RS 232-C compatible. Con- 
trollable by remote, this next gen- 
eration terminal unit with inno- 
vative modular design pro- 
vides more than six times the 
conventional amateur data 
transmission rate using 
present radio and com- 
^0^^ puter equipment. 

^^W^ ^^L Featuring three fre- 

^^^^ ^^^ quency shifts, the 

J^ ^^ ^ f TU-300isthe 

||^^k ^ on[y300boud 

ji^^ ^^ terminal unit 

offered In easy 

to construct Icit 

or wired. 




DEALERS! Flesher Corporation is seeking qualified dealers for ttie US and 
international nnarkets. For connplete dealer infdrnnation, call or write TODAY! 



300 baud communications rate 
autostart motor control with AC outlet 
remote operation 
crystal AFSK with downshift CW ID (optional) 

high quality commercial construction 
modular design with steel cose for RF shielding 
Indicator type push-button switches 
separate send and receive "reverse shift' controls 



For more information about the TIJ-300, contact: 



bar graph tuning and LED function Indicators 
mark -ho Ed and selective fading compensation 
3 shifts (170H2 standard - other shifts extra) 
qsciJIoscope tuning outputs 

easy to tune multipole active filters 

TTL and RS 232-C compatible l.'G's 

optional 20 and 60ma optical I v isolated loop supply 

simple kit construction - no instruments needed for alignment 

with AFSK installed 

^^ Flesher Corporation 

^^^^ 507 jacksor » PO. Box <?76 - Topeko. Kan$os 66601 
913^234-0196 * lelex 437125 

^23 



See List of Advertisers on page 114 



73 Magazine • July J 982 67 



mW FAST CHAilCE 

For Your Battery Packs 



ftfCHARCE ¥OUR HAND HELD 
RADIO BATTERY PACKS TO 
FULL CAPACITY IN AS LITTLE AS 
45 min. EXAMPLE- Fully Charge 
ICOM BP3 in 30^43 Minutes, 

SIPEKATE fusts fROVH) ED INURNALLt FOft 
AX. AND DC (JP( RATION. ^BUItT IN 
RLVERSf POlARIllf PftOTtCTIOfti. 



ONE UNIT DOES !T ALL 
ChjfBc ICOM. IfAISUp 
KINWOOD. TEMPO. 
SANTtC and Others Aulo- 
in«iltcj1lv in Your Hoinc. 
Cjr, Buat. R.V. or Airplane 
Aith Built-in Heavy Duly 
Pijwirr Supply or 12 lo 24 V. 
UU^rnal PX. Supply Such 
■i}CiK<)r lighter in Yf>ur Cir. 



41) Viiid suit 

^ttHiSMtn Citnipiifipnh Lifptl Thrduithipul. In \ lirllQiH< Circutl 
,!|tlnwi, 141* Cli«nitwi|t WithtHil 4nv PriiFplrhFr Hr^tini, Ot 
*r(1» (Juri^f^f Mrj*«rir% irnijlnipi|t fhJrg*- In C*lt* Ciin«ljnlil|r 

B^llK% Can R;^ Ifll Cnnnrcrrfi IndHmilcIt 




INCLUDES^ «FnM)«jbleh Fl 

Cord ftH AC, OpvFjiicxh *hd 
2 Mj^ting Connect on int Ot , 
jnpui dnd Batlenr Lcjdi. 

rtAtUAES: Hiith QyJiltlt. Cu^i^nn Detij^nrd Hrivy Gjtijte Alumifium Cjibirwl 

FULL I VR. WARBANTY ON PARTS AND WORKMANSHIP 



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prints it on the CRT; at the 
end, the B register contains 
the number of characters in 

the message. This is saved 
to use when the message is 
called The value is used by 
the LDIR routines which 
transfer the message to the 
sending buffer and to the 
CRT display, 

I was tempted to go back 
and make the program 
more compact. However, 
that would make it more 
difficult to understand and 
to modify. To add more 
messages, you can use the 
ones in the program as a 
guide and add to the end of 
the program. 

Interface 

A schematic of a very 
simple circuit is presented 
which can be used to inter- 
face the computer with 
your transmitter. The tip of 
the cassette auxiliary plug 
changes voltage from 4 to 
0.8 whenever OUT(0FFH}, A 
with A = 1 appears. This 
makes it possible to use a 



!ow-voItage comparator to 
drive the transmitter. I 
measured the current in this 
circuit at less than 10 mA 
for a +5*volt supply. Any 
supply voltage from 4 to 36 
volts can be used. Be sure 
to pick the two resistors in 
the reference voltage divid- 
er so that the reference is 
just slightly larger than 0,4 
volts. When V in is larger 
than this reference, the out- 
put of the comparator goes 
high and turns on the tran- 
sistor and this will ground 
its output That will key a 
solid-state transmitter or a 
relay if you need it, 

Conclusfon 

This program has made 
sending CW a real pleasure 
for me and 1 know the guy 
on the other end appreci- 
ates the perfectly-sent 
code. The computer is put 
into service by just plugging 
in the cassette auxiliary 
plug — the one in the mid- 
dle. Correspondence al- 
ways a pleasure. 73. ■ 



appjG 



TERMIMAIJ.ll ft tmatmm i 

ma 



-.Qt tiiKirii 

to atom 



T^RMMUILL wm (Icwgnod ham dw oubet lo bp iwii iq connsct 
to voiit rBiSio imd «»¥ Ifl ut* PVl i"fo vour raceivni h««JtpMon« 
IKk and copy Man* Ccxtv m r#!iiotfl4etvfie 4R1 1 fi Phjfi mto voni* 
CW key jsdi HfiiS itfnd M^rw Coda Artach s rnnamfiin^r^ connjtc 
tm and serid &ivdol or ASDl fITTY using eudiQ lonM IAFSK1 
thari ail [hme i% tc htjoKing rl up, 

ibm sollwaf<e is loaded mlo fma ccrnoutfiT Uom di-j^ m na^uttc 
Intor y-Qur caUtign «fid Iho tima sntf vou will aicyri lutrfiving ifn- 
m^dislely No '^iKngi or Adjusitments are m^a^aR^rv iQ locelva 
MorsG Codo, il'^ fully mjKim.fidi'^ anil i\ vvorksf You rftiiy lype vOiir 
frtftijsage whii& I'ocoivJnQ ut ]Tar\sm\ihnQ 

Ydhj will be dri Ihw #ir^ mceiving and tf$h$Tntti3nij in any miKJa. itt 
minutes As wesBtd. TEflWiNALL is simpio 

Mor9 for your monrnv, 

■ TERMr^t^LL nai Mrm ATTY temtinat umi - decnod and AFSi 
buiti in Tfffi f^u^is in luFAwi tout cost 

■ fAnuitic M«rB« rmumfitiktn. Si* siagie acnve litti^r 
dei?KM&jl>tor cofB ili« watik mmt Aum adaptrv* Motm slgonttvn 
GdtKi Hm ^stm o'wi ** iB *w id code speed cfcipltTad oo aaius 



M5fr mffTKta* coni*n% u«¥>-by ¥{q3 islTudrtKira 

■ ftuR In. ip BFBta. muHl statB*. feciJnv« fHtar RTTV antf CW 
dafnodufticr) jj4 Kt^ek toof^ RTTT d«m4}duia|Q« riH tlO 
s-"-^ ■■'■'■'■• -.- ■-I VHitf-fcB¥*»9*tf$etee{abi« afid t^vt eittwr 
Ifie p9Fii# mtfMi «f scofw ouipuls lof eas'p Tufting Copv I'm *f4k 
anei C««^ iNv nQ«i' onet Copy v^e ^ladir^ oniii 

■ fttdli In cnrvtal m i mrt l ad AFSK. Root ttjaCMe leu ewi^ rr« 
maSii demanding VHl^ w Hf apoJicasiorw A fr^at on mar? VHF 
HTTY fetffieiSfFr* 

■ Built In 110 or 220 vo<l AC piLrWf^ sjppily 

k Built in parall*! printer drivar lafiwar*. Simply ^iLs^zh » 
parail'J' ASCII' printor fa rj tHtr EPSON MX 8Dj to viHjr pfiniar fiorl 
TO tiboin hardcnpy in all modeg 

■ Multl l*v*l dkplaya nllcwvn examining and (idinni^ ci^ tiiainncal 

tt!Xi 

■ Word wfappLng, wopd mode edning. diddle, igriora itAirja]gr& 

fEtum^. uber prngrimfriitbfe end o^ hne sequflrtcu. tnJiuatalDi* car. 
Ftagev^tdlh^ mulEiplfii uui'r dntined SA/RU. trsn«Lmi.T cTcioy iPheod, nons 
(rf auiHS 4dbapnv«^. bftiit mode <trKJ" mor#> 

■ TH* ^-Ifi-Qfht TERMINALL da«f pi irmltei *| dtaat lof ir^e w 
MF or VHF, Ma™. ComraefCial. SWL qf jJaRS' SWL'* 
TERMirVAl^k mmr lw pjmcparaH loi aihec CS or ffiO Hi r«€epttar» to 



System Requirements 

TERMINALLT1 Cymmunicaiions lF>rmn i '■■■ ihm- JUS 80 Mod&U 
R«-iij-nr. n M..Mli»l I TRS 80. }6K RAM sriii Luvul II HASIC Include* 
sDf rwiin? nr^ c.n'i'vnrTn: and disk, ^^Si»mt)i<ed iind 1««ieid h&ttiw^fe and 
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TERMINALL T3 Communscaiic^hi^ rf^rmiiTTni far iNi TRS-BD Modsl 
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on Factory Direct Orders 



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DEPT 73 



f^ 44 



TO ORDER (209) 634-8888 or 867-2888 

We ar« e^t^wrionctng letephon^ dif ri4:u4iie£. — Please kdep tryir>g 

'TUS-flO u a Reijisififed Trademar*: af Tandy C«p. 
Apple n a Registered trademariL at Apple Compute Inc. 
1 yt Pads 6 Labor - ymiied Wananiy, 



The communications terminai that does it alii 



66 73Magazine • Julyjg82 



•y^^ 't^' . •' -i'."''^ ■? 




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*^See Ust of Adv&fffsefs on page 7 14 



73 Magazine * July, 1982 69 





#1 IN AMATEUR 



spectrum IBWrwaWS-Z fines of Repeaters— the 
ifforia famous 'Super Deiuxe' SCfi1000f4000, and our 
new Low Cost iine of SCR77 Repeaters. 

.i 

■•■■ : 

The New SCR77 15 Wt. Repeaters maintain the qual- 
ity of design, components and constmction which 
have made Spectnim gear famous throughout the 
world for yeafs. However, al) of the "beds & 
whistles" which you may not meed or want have 
been etimihated— a? a large cost savings to you! The 
SCR77 is a reai '%orkhorse'^ basic machine de- 
signed for those who want excellent, super-reliable 
performance year after year^-bL// no frills! CPL\ 12 
Pole IF Filter, Front End Preseiector, and a 30 Wt, 
Transmitter are the only *bjLrtJtHn' options available: 
but Autopatch, Rem»^ Cpritrol, and other equlp- 
m q^OL^Ijin be connected via the rear panel jack.) 

Of course, if you do want a full featured/Super 
Deluxe Repeater, with higher power <30"75 Wts.>, 
and a full list of 'built-in' options, then you want our 
SCR1000 or 4000—Tfte Ultimate in Repeaters\ 
Available with: Full Autopatch/Reverse Patch/Land- 
Line Control; Touch Tone Control of various repeater 
functions; 'PU; ''Emergency Pwr. ID"; various Tone & 
Timer Units, etc,^-'^ 




shown in Optionat Cabinet 

Cal! or write today for data sheets~ ^Drm es! Sofd Facfofv Direct 
or through Export Sales Reps only. Get your order in A.S.A.P.! 



Commercial Business Radio Dealer/Rep Inquiries Incited 




SPECTRUmt 

Export Orders — Contact our fnternationsl Oept. 



1055 W. GERMANTOWN PK,, DEPT 57 



70 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



OM FM Repeaters, Remote Bases,n 

Join the fun with the growing ac- 
tfvity on 10M FM! Extended *supe- 
rior' ground wave contacts; local 
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and Mobile for Nationwide or 
Foreign DX. All with the ease 
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Our Repeaters and Remote Bases 
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RX 8t TX Boards Now AvaUabte. 

1000 Mainfrannes, complete with a 
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A Complete Data Package is now 

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SPEC COMM REPEATER BOARDS & SUBASSEMBLIES 



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All equipment assembled & tested. For 2M, 220 MHz & 450 MHzf 

iOM ALSO 

AVAILABLE 



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SCR200 VHF Receiver Boerd 

tB Poi« From End Fitf. + wide dynamic 
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**S Mftisr' Discriminator & Devisiion Mtr Otil^ 

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SCR20C Receiver Assembly 

I SCR200 mountad In ati^klKJ houaing 
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S0239conn, 
I As u3ecJ tn the SCRTOOO Ready to drop Into youf 

SCR450 UHF Receiver Bd, or Asty. 

» Similar lo SCR200. excopt 42CM7(>MH£ 




WM ALSO 
AVAILABLE 
See Aug. 73 Ad, 



FL 6 Rcvr. Front 



FL6 



reselector 




a G Hi O Rasanatofs with LoNoisa Transtsior Amp i2M or 
220 WHiEl, 

a Providai tremendous rejection oi "out ot band" iignala 
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a Extremely helpful ai site^ with many neafby V^HF transmit 
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CTCtOO Rptr. COR UmarfCenfrol Sd 

• Compieie solid state coniiol for rptr GOfl. "Hang" 
Timor, '"Tirn#<Jul ■ Tim«f, TX Shutdown/ Reset, etc 

• Inctydes inputs & Qytputs lor pan^l controls 1 lamps 



Repeatef Too* « CofltFOl &4e.— For SCR1000^4000 
i CTCtOOnDZSC only 
TRA'I "Couriaey Tone Beeper" Soartj 
#Puls out a tone b^rop apx i sec afier RX stQ. 
dropa — thus atlovvlng time for breakers 

^Resets TO, TImaf aflar "t>eep'' 

TMR>1 "Karchunkar KlUar" or "Time Out Warning 
Tone' Sd. 
o Fof One of above 2 fync lions 

• "KifChunker Keller" provides adj delay tO-IO 
sec ) for tmrianptr accass Aulo- Reset at end of 
QSO. 

• TO Warning Tone provides aiariing "waftile 
apx. 10 sac belore ' time out ' 



SCAP Autopstch Board 

Proyidea all basic autopatch fur^ctions 
■Socufa 3 Digit Accesa; 1 Auk On-Otf function, 

Audto AGC; ButlMn timara; etc Baay ttf ul Audio ■ 
*0/\ inhibit bd. al»o available 
» Wrlt»Cftlt lor details and a data sheet 

RPCM Board 

• U$ad ^/SCAP board to provide Revefse Patch" 
ar^d Lanif Lme Control of Repealer 

» Includes 'a«d i'"* answering ccuitrf 

ID250 CW ID A Audio Mlxet Boerd 

a Adjustable iO rone speeds ievel, timing cycle 
i4 mput AF l^iver & Local Mic amp 

• COR mpul & Jimtr hold Circuitt 

• CMOS logic, PROM memory— 250 biia/Channai 

• Up 10 4 dttlertnt ID channels^ 

• Many other teatures Factory Programmed 



^ 



^^*j#r^ 



PSM*1 Repeetef Power Supply Mod Kit 

• For SCR 1000 or SCR-4000 
Replaces Darlington Pass Tr —tor improve 
rmitabiiiry 

Inciudai new overvoUaga "Crowbar" shut- 
down Circuit. 

• Complete Kit, w^assambl^d PC board. S 19.50 

+ $350 sh lipping /hand I mg. 

PRM200 Power Supply Fitter 
Cep/Regulfttor/Metering Board 

• Aa ui«d in \rm SCRlQOO as main part of 
13JVDOaA Pwr. Spiy 

• Includes 14,000 ^F Filter Cap. Reg fC and Drivef 
Tfanav, Vfl Meter shunts and Cal pota. 

• Requires Xfmr,. Br. Rect . Pass IrJHeal Stnk, (Op- 
tional Meter), for complete supply. 



SCT410 XMTR. ASSY. 
SCTHO VHF Xmtr/Exclfer Board 

• ? Of 10 Wts Output 100% Duly Cycle' 

• InflnJIe VSWR proof. 

• True FM lor axe audio quality 

• Designed specifically tor continuous rptr sor 
vice Very low in "whjte noise " 

• Spurious -70 d8 Hsfmonics -60 dB 

• Wttti .00105% xtal. 

• BA'10 30 Wt Amp tiCMni & Heet Stnk. 3 seo LP. 
Filler & rel. pwr. seitsor. BATS 7S WL unft also 
available. 

SGT110 Transmitter Assembly 

^SCTltO moi/n t9d tn shte fi:ted hQus tng 

• Same as usad an SCRlQOO. 

• Gompleiely assmbld. w/F.T. caps, S0239 conn. 

• 7. 10. 30, or 75 Wt. unit. 

SCT410 UHF Transmitter Bd. or Assy. 

• Stmtiar to SCI fW. W Wts nom 

• Avail w/ or w/o OS- IS Sup«r H^ilk StaWHty 
Cryatal Oec JOven. 

• BA-40 40W. UHF AMP. BD. &. HEAT SJNfC 

PC6-1 Xmtr. Powor Control Board 

• For SCTI to or SCTitO Emc iters 

• Varies B+ lo control Pwr Out 

• Switchable HJ, Low. or Med Pwr out, locally or 
ramotely. Adj, levejs, 

TTC100 Touchtone 



i: 



Control Board 



AJ 



con/mvNW/iTiONS corp. 



Inqulm about 'syrpfus' 220 TX 9oer«fa. Vt Pricmt 
iNorristown, PA 19401 • (215)6311710 



• 3 digrt ON, 3 digit OFF control of a jingle repeater 
funcfion. or (opllonaf^ 2 functions (2 digits ON/OFF 
each), 

• Can be used to pull In a relay, trigger joflic, etc. 

• Typically used tor Rptr., ON/OFF, HtyLO Pwr PL 
Of^/OFF. Patch Inhibit/Reset, etc. 

• Stable antMalaing design 5s IJmit on access 
For add1 function's), add a "Parliat TTC" board 

Calf, or ^6B 

Send ^of 
0«ta SAeetaf 



m^Se0 List of AJve/r/se/s o/r page 7 14 



73 Magazine • July, 1982 71 



cw 



The Air Force Way 



Staff Sgt. Ed Metzter 

Keester Techmcal Training Center 

KeG5ier AFB MS 39534 



Thousands of hams use 
Morse code every day 
to make gontact with 
friends and acquaintances 
around the world, but 
Morse systems operators in 
the Air Force use the inter- 
national code for a more 
serious reason, 

''The people we train 
here will go to various in- 
stallations around the 
world, mainly to assist in 
communications-gathering 
operations/' said Major Em- 
mitt D. Lane, chief of the 
Systems Operations Branch 
at Keesler Technical Train- 
ing Center, Keesler Air 
Force Base, Mississippi. 
''Our operators monitor 
and transcribe radio com= 
munications at many loca- 
tions, providing the Air 
Force with a secure com- 
munications security pro- 
gram." 



It's a critical job in 
today's complex, ever- 
changing world and it's the 
job of the Systems Opera- 
tions Branch to see that the 
Air Force operators are 
highly qualified for their 
responsibilities. The branch 
is under the command of 
the 3300th Technical Train- 
ing Wing, the Air Force's 
electronics training center. 
At Keesler^ airmen selected 
for Morse systems operator 
duty undergo an intensive 
21 -week course of instruc- 
tion that is divided into 
three blocks of instruction. 
Students must be abfe to 
transcribe 20 groups of 
code per minute to grad* 
uate from the course, al- 
though the average gradu- 
ate does about 25 five-char- 
acter groups a minute. 

To achieve this end, 
students spend approx- 




imately six hours a day, five 
days a week in the class- 
room. In block I, the 
students are introduced to 
international Morse code 
and typing, 

''We teach by the reflex 
method," said Cicero 
Rhodes, an instructor super- 
visor who spent more than 
20 years in the field before 
retiring from active duty. 



"When the students hear 
the dahs and dits on their 
headphones, they automat- 
ically type the letter or 
number. After a lot of drill 
and repetition, it becomes 
second nature to them/' 

"Students learn the 31 
characters during their first 
week of school/' said 
Technical Sgt. Robert C. 
Templin, block I instructor. 




6/ocfc / students are drilled on the basic characters of ir^ter- 
national Morse code. 

72 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



A block I instructor uses the Vibroflex key to drill students 
before hooking into the distribution center. 




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WORK THE U.H.F. BANDS 

Add a iransverter or converter to your existing K)m, 6ni or 2m equipments. 
C'hoosc from ihe iargesr sdection of modules available for DX» OSCAR » 
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CONVERTERS 

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MMK [296-i44, MMC 1280— ATV 
Wriie for details and available options, 

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Prevent OSCAR 8 Mode J descnst 
Use MMF200-7 S42.95 
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m-'See Usi of AOventsers an page 1f4 



73Magazm& • July. 1982 73 





A student in block III scans radio frequencies for message A Vibroftex semi-automatic key used by instructors to drill 
traffic. students on individual characters. 



''We combine learning tine 
character sounds and typ- 
ing. On day one, they (earn 
the first finger characters 
as they appear on a stan- 
dard typewriter, day two 
we teach second finger, and 
so on By the end of the 
block, students are ex- 
pected to copy 12 groups 
per minute " 

Templin added that stu- 
dents who show effort, but 
have some difficulty learn- 
ing the code, are set back in 
the course to bring their 
proficiency up. About 30 
percent of the students, for 
one reason or another, do 
not graduate. 

After learning the charac- 
ters, the ditty-bop pers, as 
they call themselves, work 
on their copy speed. As with 
learning the characters, this 
is done gradually. 

''We start the classes at 
four groups per minute, 
then work up to 12/' said 
Templin, "Ifs a matter of 
repetition and memoriza- 
tion," Codes are transmit* 
ted to the various class^ 
rooms by a closed-circuit 
system from a single distri- 
bution center. The center 
can send code in separate 
speeds to individual stu- 
dents or send uniform code 
to an entire class. The code 
tapes are made by the school 
staff, and unlike other 
branches of the military, 
are done by hand rather 
than computer. According 
to Rhodes, this personal- 
ized system allows for 

74 73 Magazine * July, 1982 



more individual attention. 

In the basic block, stu- 
dents spend three to four 
hours a day copying mes- 
sages from the distribution 
center. Some time is also 
spent in character drills. Us- 
ing the Vibroflex semi- 
automatic key, an instruc- 



tor can drill the 20 or so 
students in his class on par- 
ticular problem characters 
or patterns before hooking 
up to the center. 

In blocks 11 and III, 
students continue to in- 
crease their copying speed 
while [earning other facets 




An instructor prepares a tape that will be used to broadcast 
horn the distribution center 



of the career field. In the in- 
termediate block, students 
are taught radio wave and 
antenna theory and how to 
operate receivers. At the 
end of this block, students 
are able to copy 16 groups 
of code per minute. The last 
block deals with complex 
receiving using more than 
one receiver and locating 
copy on different frequen- 
cies. By the end of block III, 
students are expected to 
copy 20 groups per minute, 

'"It's a very demanding 
course," said Sergeant 
Templin. "The material is 
very abstract. If someone is 
having trouble with a par- 
ticular character, you can't 
just say, 'OK, turn to page 
14 in the text and read all 
about the letter C/ It re- 
quires a person who isn't 
nervous or high strung, who 
won't get upset about every 
mistake he or she makes." 

"Like anything else, it 
takes a lot of practice and 
patience/' Rhodes empha- 
sized. "How many tennis 
balls do you think you'd hit 
perfecting your backhand? 
Our methods aren't hit and 
miss, by any means, but I 
would say that repetition is 
the keystone to learning 
Morse code/' 

"Tm confident our meth- 
ods work and that we are 
turning out very capable 
people into the field," said 
Major Lane "We have to; 
our graduates fill some of 
the most critical positions 
in the Air Force." ■ 



t'.V 





o-«2, 



^ 



OA 



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PEP, CW-200 watts • Dimensions: 225W x 
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A 



AMATEUR RADIO INNOVATIONS 



i 




SOCIAL 



EVENTS ] 



MtLWAl>K£E Wl 
JUL 6- VI 

TTm YL InJemaliofiaJ Single Sideband- 
efs (YLISSBl 19S2 Cofiv«ntioR will be helcJ 
on J u ly a- 11 . ! 962. in M 1 1 M aukae W I Acti v^ 
t^a will include the OX lloun<}up, the Sy^ 
terns Awards Banquet on Salurday night, 
ttfid a major doof pri^a ol an tcoin tC-2AT. 
Jgan Chittenden WA28GE will lall about 
hf&f recent Chinra trip, Pre-conventiofi ac- 
tivrlies will begin July 5. t982, iMith goif- 
ing, fishing, and side trips planned De- 
tailed information mar be obtained by 
sending an SASE {business si^ to Sirs 
Musachi KB9QC. PO Box 18123, Mitwau- 
k£e Wl 53216 

STATE COLLEGE PA 
JUL 10 

TTie Nitlany An^at^r fladto Qlut> Hain 
Festrvai will t)& mic on juty lO, 1902:* from 
8:00 am to 4:00 ptftt. at the HR&^ng»r pic- 
nic grcHjnds. Sdenc« P«nt Road ibetwieen 
US ^2 West and Rte 26 East). Slate Col^ 
lege PA. Talk in on 146J&J6. 146 2^85. 
and 146.52 Features wkU mclude a Ilea 
market, technical seaslpnts, numerous 
pfiies and cofitesis. ami refreshments. 
Tickets are S3 00; laiigating and ta£)Ees are 
SS.OO. For more information, contact 
Richard L Sin« K&3WN 1600 E. Branch 
Road. State GoHege PA 16801. 

OAK CHEEK Wl 
JULY 10 

The South Mllwaukeft Amateur Radio 
Ciub will hold its annual swapfest on Satur^ 
tJay, July iO. 1982, from 7:00 am lo 5:00 pm 
at the American Legion Posi i^. 9327 
South Shepard Avenue, Oak Creek WL Ad^ 
miss Jon is $2.00 and (nclcides a happy hour 
with tree beverages. Prizes include a $100 
first prize and e $60 second prl^e plus a 
variety of other prices to be awarded during 
the day. Parking, a picnic area, hot and cold 
sandwiches, liquid relreahments, and over- 
night camping will be available. Talk-In on 
146.94 Mora detail a, thCludlnf} a map. may 
tie obtained from the South Milwaukee Am- 
ateur Radio CFub. PO Box 102, South 
Milwaukee Wl 53172. 

WILTON ONT CAN 
JULIO 

TheQyrlington Amateur Radbo Club will 
hotd the 8th annual Ontario Hamtest on 
Saturday. July 10, 1932^ at the Milton Fair> 
g round e, Milton, Ontario, Admission is 
S3.00 per person or S2-00 (Or pie-registra^ 
lion, There will be a flea market, <lisolays. 
an auction, contests, and pfi/ea. Camping 
will t>e available and grounds will op»n 
Frtday ntght for earty campeia. For pri^ 
registration, contacl Mike Gobb 
VE3MWR. PO Box 836. Burlington L7R 
3y7, Canada 

aOiSSEVAIN MAN CAN 
JUL 10-11 

The t^h annuiffll lntefnation>al 1-lan^fest 
will be held on Ju^y 10^1 1, 1982. on Ihe Ca- 
nadian side oMhe Infemailonai Peace 
Gardens between Ounsettti ND and Bojs- 
sevaJn MAN in the Canadian Pavilion. Ac- 
tivities will include transmitter hynis, mo- 
bile judging, CW and OLF contests, «emt- 
nars for OMs arid yls, flea mariieis, a ham 
auction, a Sslurdaymght darftce, a Sunday 
mHDfntng breaittast, arvd lol$ oH Qf^^^t 
prizes. For ittofe informatii^n, contact Ber- 
file Areand Wt3MD, PO Box 53. Epc^ing 



ND 58843, or William M Shryock, Jr 
WMGRC, 322 Easi 4th Street, Wifliston 
ND 56801, 

RAPID CITY SD 
JUL 10-11 

The Black Hills ARC will hold the annu- 
al South Dakota Hamtest on Juty 10-11, 
1982. at the Siirbeck Center. SO School ot 
Mines and Technology, Rapid City SD. 
Pfe- registration is $7.00^ registration at 
Itie ^ooT is S@'QQ- There will be a pure 
ffrawing for pre-regiSitrarfts. Forums., corv 
le^ts, a picnic^ and prices Tables are free 
tor the ftea marl^eL Talk in on .34^.94 
(WPBUQ, For further informaUon, write 
Btadt Hills ARC, c^ Rudy WW^A. 4622 
C^itOl, Rapid City SO 57701, 

MAPLE RIDGE SC CAN 
JUL 10-11 

The Map^e Rtdge ARC will hold its Hanv 
fe&f '82 on July lavt^ 1962, at I he Mapid 
Ridge Fairgrounds, located 30 mites east 
ol Vancouver. Maple Ridge BC. Registra- 
tion for hams is $5.00; tor non hams over 
t2 years old. S2.00. There will be food, 
prizes, a swap & shop. dtspJays, a t>unny 
hunt« ladies' and children's programs, and 
a main prize drawmg for a Kenwood 
TR-2500. Camper spaces will be avail able 
f$ome With electrical hiookups) Talk in on 
l4§.20rS0. For more informal ion and reg- 
istration, comae! Mapte Ridge ARC. Box 
292, Maple Ridge BC V2X 7GZ 

ALEXANDER m 
JUL11 

The Genesee Radio Amateurs, Inc., will 
hold the second annual A RRL- approved 
Batavia Hamfest on Sunday. July 11, 1982, 
from 7:00 am to 5;00 pm at tfie Alexander 
Firemefi's Grounds, Rle. 9&(nlne miles south 
of Batayia), Alexander NY. Registration is 
S2.00 in advance, $3.00 at the gate, and 
SivOO tor the flea market. There will be 
man/ prizes, a large exhibit area. OM and 
VL programs, contests, plenty of food, 
overnight camping, and a boat anchor 
auction at 3;00 pm. Talk in on 4.71/5.31 
(WaRCX) or .52, For advance tickets, make 
checks payable to Batavia Hamlast, c/0 
Gram, Inc., Box 572, Batavia NY 14020 

MCKEESPORT PA 
JUL 11 

The Two Rivers Amateur Radio Club, 
Inc., will hold its annual hamfest on July 
11, 1962, from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, ai the 
McKeesport Campua of Perm State Uni- 
versity, McKeesport PA. There will be 
forums, prizes, food, an outdoor flea mar- 
ket, and indoor setups Talk-in on 146.22J 
.62- For more information. te^hone{4l^ 
464^1550. 

INDIANAPOLIS IN 
JULY 11 

The Indiana State Amateur Radto Ctin- 
ventian. in conjunction witti thie Iridianap- 
oUs Ha mf est and Computer Show, will be 
held on Sunday, July 11, 1982. at the Man- 
on County Fairgrounds at tt»e southeast- 
eni intersection of 1-74 arrd 1-466. Gate 
tickets afe S4.00 and entitle you to all ac^ 
ttvities, including thie mafor priie drawing 
and hourly prizes. There will be inside and 
outside (lea markets, a separate compui^ 
BT show and flea mailtet, a comrnetctai 
vendors' display area, technical forums, 
club aclivitres, and ladies programs 



There will be setups after 12:00 noon on 
Saturday, July 10th, Security will be pro- 
vided Saturday night and Sunday; and 
camper hookup facilities will be available 
on the grounds. For further information, 
contact Indianapolis Mamf est. Box 110B&, 
Indianapolis IN 46201. 

MANCHESTER NH 
JUL 17 

The New Hampshire FM Association wiU 
hokj an electrortica flea marksl on Saturday. 
July 17. 1962. at the Manchester Municipal 
Airport, Manchester NH. beginning at 9:00 
am, Ger>era] admtss-ion is f 1.00 per p^son; 
sellers, S5O0 Sellers sliouk] tailgate or 
bring their own tables Commercial dis- 
piays are welcome, Refreshrnents will be 
available and door prues will bG awarded. 
TatlHn on 145 52 FM and 124.9 AM. For ^- 
tt>er infofmalion, contacf Dicit DesRosiers 
W1KGZ at i:G03)^66fi-d6SO, or Ooug Ark^ 
KTWRM.^ 30 Meadowg^en Drive, Man- 
chestei NH 03103, (603^622^0831. 

SHE80YaA#< Wl 
JUL 17 

Ttie ttvird annual Sheboygan Ck>unty 
Amateur Radio Club Lakeshore SwapTest 
and Brat Fry wifl be held on July 17, 1962, 
from 3:00 am to 4:t)0 pm. at Ihe Wilson 
Tovm Hetl, soyth o( Sheboygan Wl, There 
wilt be a public auction and prizes tables 
are Iree and cam^ping will be availaJDle at 
Terry Andie State Parti. For a flyer and ad- 
diltonal Information, write PO Box 695^ 
Sheboygan Wl 53DQ1, or call (414H57- 



HARBOR SPRINGS Ml 
JUL 17 

The Stratts Area Amateur ^adio Club wlH 
hold it a annual hamfesi on July 17, 13S2, 
from 9:00 am to 4iX] pm at the Harbor 
Springs High School. Hartsor Springs Ml. 
Donations are $2.00 at the door and table 
space is £2 50. Doors will be open at 8:00 
am tor &elops. Luhch will be served from 
11:00 am to 1;00 pm and refreshments will 
be available during the day. There will be 
one main door pri^e and smaller prizes will 
be awarded hourly. The school parking lot 
is trea for aelf-^Dontained RVs to use for ar> 
overnight stay and many places of interest 
to YLs are available nearby. Talk*ln on 
.S2^.52 and 146,07^67. For more delails, 
Conlact Mr Bernie Stotnick KBSRE, 630 
Ann Street, Harbor Springs fvll 49740, ot call 
(eT6)-526-56U. 

EUGENE OR 

JUL 17-ia 

The Lane County Ham Fair will be held 
on July 17-fe. 1962, at me Oregon Nation- 
ai Guard Armoiy. 2515 Centennial, Eu- 
gene OR. Tickets are $4.00 each and entl^ 
tie Ihe holder to one extra drawing tickel 
Iree ^f pufchased before July Isl. Doors 
will open at 6;00 am Saturday and Sunday. 
Features miU include a swap si^d shop at 
$5.00 a table, a 2-meter bunny hunt, wonv 
en's activities, a children's corner, com- 
puter demos, technical seminars, QCWA, 
and a grand pn^e of an I com 730 fow-band 
mobile rig There will be an all-day snack 
bar. tree parking for RVs (no hooKups}, 
and a Saturday pollock supper at 6:00 pm. 
Tallt'in on .52/.52. 146.2af,36, t47,d&rj^ 
And 3,910 HF, For advance liekels, send 
an SASE to Eunice Brown WA7MOK, 2456 
Corral Courl. Springfield OR 97477. or 
phone l503H47-79(3&. 

8QWL114G OREEN OH 
JUL 18 

The i7th armuai Wood County HafrvAr 
fUma will be ti^ on Sunday. July IS. 
1962, at the Wood County Fairgrounds, 
Bowling Green OH. Gates will open at TO 



am, with free admission and parking. 
There will be drawings for prizes: tickets 
are $1 .50 in advance ar>d $2.00 at the gate. 
Trunk sales space and food will be avail- 
able, Advance table rentals are 13,00 to 
dealers only. Saturday setup available un- 
til e:00 pm. K8TIH talk- in on .52. For more 
into or dealer rentals, send an SASE to 
Wood County ARC, c/o S. Irons. PO Box 
73. Luckey OH 43443. 

WASHINGTON MO 
JULIO 

Tbe Zero Beaters Amateur Radio Cfub 
wilt hold its ham f est on Sunday, Juiy ts,^ 
1982. at the Washington Fairgrounds. 
Washington MO. Taik-in on 147.84^.24 For 
more infofmation. contact Rich Ngellce 
WAfNUI, Rie, 3. 10 Richard Drive, 
Washington MO &3O90i 

CANTON OK 
JUL IB 

The Tusco Radio Club tW6iZ?t| and the 
Canton Arnatrair Radio Club (WSAU will 
tiold live 8th annual Hali of Fame Ham lest 
on July 10, 1962. at the Nimishitlan 
Grange. 6461 Easton Street. Louisville 
OH. Admission is S2,50 m advance, 13.00 
at the gate, ar>d children under 16 will be 
aidmitted free. Tlie fiea market will open at 
SbOO am and activities will include awaids, 
forums, dealers, and XYL programs. Talk- 
in on 146J9/79, 146^52/52. and 147,72^.12, 
For reservations and/or Inlornnalkin, con- 
tact Butch Lebold WASSHP. 10877 Hazel- 
view Avenue, Alliance OH 4460 L or phone 
(216V€2 1^794. 

LA PORTE IN 
JUL 18 

The LaPorle County Summer Hamfesi 
will be tmi^ on Sunday, July ie, 1932, at the 
County Fairgrounds, LaPorie IH^ Good 
food , CO I d d rinks , a nd a n Indoor sell I ng area 
will be available. For reservations and more 
information, write PO Box 30* LaPorte IN 
46350. 

GRAND RAPIDS MN 
JUL 18 

The Range Wide Hamfesi will be held 
on July 18, 1982, from 10:00 am to4:(X) pm 
at Gum Park, Highway 38, 6 ml les north of 
Grand Rapids MN, Admission and tables 
are free. Bring the family for a picnic, 
games, prizes, and fun. Parking and camp- 
grounds will be available. Talk-in on 
146.28^.88 and 52. For more information, 
write Bob WDOAAF, 736 Crystal Springs 
Road, Grand Rapids MN 55744, or call 
(213)-326'2258 ^even frigs). 

OKANOGAN WA 
JUL 24-25 

The Okanogan Valley International Ham- 
test will be heua July 24-25, 1982. at the 
Okanogan County FairgrouriNds, Okanogan 
WA. R^istration is $3.00 for nams and 
$2iX> for non-hams. Activities wili tr^clude 
bingo, a cake walk, a 2'riieter bunrry hunt» 
and a Sunday pottuck dinner, followed tsy 
a drawing fof prizes Talk-in on 146.97. 
Hookups will be available (or tftose who 
rieed tfiera and motels and restaurants aie 
Close by. For more information, contact 
Frank Bjgeknv WA7ZEV Of Byck B4^h«non 
W7G5N. 

OKLAHOMA CITY OK 
JUL 23-25 

The Central Oklahoma Radio Amateurs, 
Inc. will hold the Oklahoma State ARRL 
Convention at "Ham Holiday '82" on July 
23-25. 1932. at tt^ Myriad Convention Cen- 
ter, OklatMima City OK. Pre-feglstratlon is 
S6.00 and includes free ffeB-markei le- 
bles. The pre-registrat^on award is a Radio 



76 73 Magazine * Jufy/1982 



2300 MHz VARIABLE DOWNCONVERTER 

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73Magaiine • July, 1982 77 



Shack TRS-SO color computer. Featured 
wjll be a computer fair \with programs on 
personal computers, plus an ARRL (orum, 
AMSAT, DX and the Art of QSLing, FM, An- 
tennas, and Alternate Energy Sources. 
There wltf be an Indoor Hea market, corrt- 
mercial displays, a ladies' prografn, and 
on Saturday night, July 24th, the Oklaho^ 
ma Diamond Jubilee Banquet foJIowed by 
a western dance. The Ham Holiday Grand 
Avvard will be presented on Sunday, July 
25\h. For registration forms and addition- 
al information, write CORA Ham Holiday 
'82, PO Boh 15013. Del City OK 73t55. 

WELLINGTOI^ OH 
JUL 24 

The Norrhern Ohio Amateur Radio 
Society will hold its annual ARRL NOARS- 



fest on Saturday, Jul^y 24, 1962. at the 
Loratn County Fairgrounds, 1B rnllea 
south ot Lorain , one mtte west ot Route 58 
on Route IS, Wellington OH. Admission 
tickets are S2.50 m advance, $3.00 at the 
gate, and are good tor ail prize drawings. 
Children under 12 will be admitted tree. 
Admission tickets may be ordered from 
NOARSfeSt, PO Sox 354, Lorain OH 44052. 
There will be over lOO prl2es, including an 
Icom 730 and power supply, an Ameritron, 
Inc., Al-80 linear amplifier, and an Icom 
]C-2AT. Featured will be a large tlea mar- 
ket with parking spaces at S1 .00 each, free 
parking, an indoor exhibit tian^ refresh- 
ments, and tree overnight camping (with- 
out hookups) on Fridey. Indoor exhibit 
spaces with fl-foot tables are available at 
$3.00 each. Send a check for advance reg- 



istration to Ernte or Pat Jackson, 201 Park 
Avenue, EJyria OH 44035. Talk- in on 
146,52^.52 and 146.10/.70. 

ROUGH KEEPStE NY 
JUL 24 

The Mt. Beacon Amateur Radio Ciub 
wdl hold iits annual t^amfest on July 24, 
1982, begmning at 6:00 am. at the Arimg. 
ton Senior High School, Poughkeepste 
NY. Admission is $3.00 [ J(YLs and chi Id ren 
admitted Iree), tailgating space is $3.00 
(includes 1 free admission), and a laisle 
space is $4.00 (includes 1 free table and 
admission). Tiiere will tse the free riea mar- 
ket tables jindoors, parking door pri^e5^ an 
auction starling at 2:00 pm, and hot food 
and beverages, Taik-ln on 146,37/. 97 and 
14^,52, For additional information, ad- 



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• 16 lines by 36 or 72 character display 

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• Requires ± 12 VDC and external TV monitor 

• One year limited warranty 

• Small size (8" x 3" x 12.75") 

Write or call for more details. See the CWR-6700 at 
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BOX 365 

URBANA, ILLINOIS 61801 217-367 7373 



■345 



78 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



vance tickets, or registration, send an 
SASE to Walt Goiter WA2ZCN. North Hill- 
side Lake Road, VVappi;ngers Falts NY 
12590, or phone (914)-226-6636. 

GREENVILLE OH 
JUL 24-25 

T tie Treaty City Amateur Radio Associa- 
tion will be operating special event sta- 
lion W&UMD from the site o1 the Annie 
OakEey Days celebration, from 1600Z Juty 
24 urttit 1600Z July 25. They wl 1 1 operate up. 
10 kHz from the boltorr ot the General 
band on 40 and 20 meters and will venture 
into the 40-metGr Novice band occasionaJ- 
(y. Send a business size SASE and QSL 
cards for a speciat certificate to TCARA. 
Box 91, Greenville OH 45331. 

WEST FRIENDSHIP MD 
JUL 25 

The Baltimore Radio Amateur Tslevi- 
smn Society (BRATS) will hoid its annual 
BRATS MaryJand hamfest on Sjnday, Ju- 
ly 25, 1982, at the Howard County Fair- 
grounds, Route 144 at Rottle32. adjacent 
to Interstate 70, about 15 miJes west of 
Baltimore. In West Friendship MD. Indoor- 
tables with ac power are $16.00 each; 
without ac power, $10.00 each, tndpor tall- 
gating is $5.00 per space: outdoor tailgal- 
ing is S3.00 per space. Overnight RV hook-- 
ups wiM be available. For more informa- 
tion and reservations, write to BRATS, PO 
Box 5915, Baltimore MD ai20fl. 

CENTREVILLE Ml 
JUL 25 

The Amateur Radjo Pitbiic Servtce As- 
social ion of St. Josepti County Ml will 
hold its 4th annual swap and shop on July 
25, 1982, at the St. Joseph County Fair- 
grounds^ Centreville IMI. Doors open aiB;00 
am. Tickets are £2.00 in advance and 33.00 
at the gate. Indoor tables are S2.00 Trunk 
sales are tree. Camping iis available Satur- 
day night only for £6,00, Taik-in on 146.52. ' 
For more information, contact Dennis 
Cutler NSDDtJ, 3051 Z Avenue, Vickesburg 
Ml 49097- 

WHEELING WV 
JUL 25 

The Triple Stales Radio Amateur CJub 
will hold Jts 4th annual bamfest on Sun- 
day, J u ly 25, 1 962, Ffom 9;00 am to 4:00 pm,. 
at Wheeling Park, Wheeling WV. Admis-' 
sion is $2-00 (50/50); children under 12 will 
be admitted free. There will be major 
prizes plus door prizes every 15 m In utes; a 
t5-minute auction eveTy hour on the hour: 
free parking for 1,000 cars; refreshments; 
ARRUSWOT/TSRAC booths; indoor deal- 
er displays; and a flee market. There will 
be setups the nig hi betore ot at 7:00 am 
Sunday morning. Talk-tn on 146.31/.91 and 
146.52. For advance dealer registration, 
elecificai outtet and table requests, sub- 
mission of free ads for the club's hamfest 
issue, and more information, corjtact 
TSRAC, Box 240, RD 2. Adena OH 43901. 

NEWORLEAf^SLA 
JUL 25 

The Del g ado Community College Ama- 
teur Radio CJub will hoid its annual swap- 
test on Sunday, July 25, 1982, from 8:00 am 
to 4 : OO p m, at th e P^n st y le to C it y Park , isfe w 
Orleans LA There is no charge for setting; 
up. but those parilcipating must bring their 
own tables. Admission is free. There will l>e 
plenty of free parking, and food and drinks 
wHI be availabfe nearby. Talk-in on T46.67. 
For turther irrformation, contact Jim Wolfe^ 
Club President, Oelgado Amateur Radio 
Club, Delgado Commur>ity Coilegei 616 



Continued on page 150 

Reader Service far facing page ^^15-^ 



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'See List ot Adverrtsers on p«g« TI4 



73 Magazine • JyiyJ982 81 



K INWCJOO 2m FH tllANSCtlVCN 



CONVENIENT TOP CONTROLS 



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Tlie TR-2500 is a compact 2 
meter FM handheld transceiver 
featuring an LCD readout, 10 
memories^ lithium battery 
meinoiy back-up, memory scan, 
programmable automatic band- 
scan, Hi/Lo power switch and 
built-in sub -tone encoder. 

TR-2500 FEATURES: 

• Extremely compact and light 
weight 66 [2-5/8) W x 168 (6-5/8) 
H X 40 a-5/S] D, mm (inchesl. 
540 g. (1 .2 lbs) with NiCd pack, 

• LCD digital frequency readout. 

• Ten memories Includes *M0" 
memory^ for non-standard 
split repeaters. 

• LltJiium battery memory 
back-up* built-in, (est. 5 year life}, 

• Memory scan. 

• Programmable automatic band 
scan allows upper and lower 
frequenc}^ limits and scan steps 
of 5 kHz and larger (5, 10, 15. 
20, 30 kHz . . . etc) to be 
programmed. 







■:d -(');/'> 



SOUflCH FOWtft-VOL 



UP/DQWrsl iiictiiual scan. 
Repeater reverse operation. 
2-5 W or 300 mW 1<F output. 
(HI/ LOW power switch). 

- Built-in tunable (with variable 
resistor) sub-tone encoder. 

« Built-in 16-key autopatch. 

• Slide-iock battery pack. 
Keyboard frequency selection. 
Covers 143.900 to 148.995 MHz 
in 5 idriz steps. 

■' Optional power source, MS4 
mobile or ST-2 AC charger/ 
power supply allow^s operation 
wiiHe charging. (Automatic 
drop-in connections J 
High impact plastic case. 
I3attery status indicator. 

- Two lock switches for keyboard 
and transmit. 

Standard accessories; 

• Flexible rubberized antenna with 
BNC connector. 

• 400 mAH heavy-duty Nl-Cd 
battery pack. 

• AC Charger. 





Optional accessories; 

• VB^2530 25 W RF Power amp. 
I3NC-BNC cables, and mounting 
bracket, supplied. 

• MS4 13.8 VDC mobile stand/ 
charger/power supply. 



Optional accessories: 

• ST-2 Base station power supply 
and quick charger (a pprox 1 hrj 

• TU-! Programmable "DIP switch' 
(CTCSS) encoder 

• SMC-25 Speaker microphone. 

• LH'2 Deluxe leather case. 

• PB''25 Extra Ni-Cd battery pack, 
400 mAH, heavy-duty. 

• BT-1 Battery case for A A 
manganese or alkaline cells. 

■ BH-2 Belt hook. 

• WS-1 Wrtst strap. 

• EP-1 Earphone. 




.^tm 


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Optional accessories: 

• KPS-7 DC power supply for 
TR-9130 base station operation. 
7 A inteiiuittcnt, 6 A continuous, 
protection circuit built-in. 

• SP-40 compact mobile speaker. 
Only 2-11/16 W x 24/2 H x 2-1/8 
D (inches). Handles 3 watts 

of audio. 

• TK-1 AC adapter for memory 
back-up (not shown)* 



All mode (FM/SSB/CW) 25 watts, plus ...!!! 



The TR-9i30 is a powerful, yet 
compact, 25 watt FM/USB/LSB/ 
CW truisceivert featuring six 
memories, memoiy scan* mem- 
oiy back-up capability, automatic 
band scan, all-mode squelch, 
and CW semi break-in. Available 
witb a 18-key autopatck UP/ 
DOWK micropbone (MC-461, or 
a basic UP/DOWN microphone, 

TE-9130 FEATURES: 

• 25 Watts RF output on all 

modes. (FM/SSB/CW). 



FM/USB/LSB/CW all mode. The 
mode switch, witli the digital 
step (DS) switch, determines the 
size [100 Hz, 1 kHz, 5 kHz, 10 
kHz) of the tuning step. 
Six memories. On FM. memories 
1-5 for simplex or +600 kHz 
ofifset, using OFFSET switch. 
Memory 6 ror non-standard 
offset All six memories may be 
simplex, any mode> 

Memory scan. Scans memories 
in w^hich data is stored. 



• Internal battery memory back- 
up, using 9 V Ni<^d battery, [not 
KENWOOD supplied). Memories 
are retained approx. 24 hours, 
adequate for the typical move 
from base to mobile. External 
bacK-up terminal on the rear. 

• Automatic band scan. Scans 
within whole 1 MHz segments 
(ie., 144.0444.999 MHz). 

• Dual digital VF'^O^s. 

•* Transmit frequency leaning while 
transmitting, for OSCAR 
operations. 



'4 P- 

^7 



KEN\A/aaD 

TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 

1111 West Walnut, Compton, California 90220 



Squelch circyit. all modes 

(FM/SSB/CW). 

Repeater reverse ^w?.tch. 

Tone switch, 

CW semi break-in circiait with 

side tone. 

Digital display with green LED's, 

Compact size and lightweight. 

170 (6-11/16) W X 68 (24i/l"6J H x 

241 (9-1/2) D mm tinch), 2.4 kg 

(5.3 lbs J weight. 

Covers 143.9 to 148.9999 MHz. 

HL^LOW power switch. 25 or 5 

watts on FM or CW. 

TVansmit offset switch. 

High performance noise blanker. 

RF gain control,* R(T circuit. 



IHATI 



CMtrvft 



KIT/ ^11 



w«aNn 



(' 






m 



iAHO 



^ * i 



#f '*^Hf 









*-• 



nOfiS** 






'^'►'" 'W^^'^i 





"Top-notch"... VBT, notch, IF shift, 



jfie TS-830S has every 
conceivable operating feature 
built'io for 160-10 meters 
(including the three new bands]. 
It combines a high dynamic 
range with variable bandwidth 
timing (VBT)« IF ahifl, and an 
IF notch filter as well as very 
sharp fUters in the 455 kHz 
second IF. 

830S FEATURES: 

LSB. USB. and CW on 160-10 

mcttTs. including tht- new [0. 18, 

Eirul 24-MHz bands, 

Rpi Hves WWV on 10 MHz. 




- Wide receJvrr dynamic range, 
Junction FETs in the balanced 
mixer, MOSFET RF amplified al 
low leveL and dual resonator for 
each band. 

• Variable bandwidth tuning 
(V^T). Varies IF filter passband 

width. 

• Notch filter hi^h-Q active circuit 
In 4 55 -kHz second IF. 

• IF shift Ipassband tuning). 

• Noise-blanker ihreshaJd 
level cuntrul. 



TPM^j 



range 

• BulU-ln digital display. 
(Hnort^scenl tube), wfth 
analog dial. 

• 6146B final with RF negative 
feedback. Runs 220 W PEP 
fSSB}yl80 W DC ICWI input on 
all bands. 

• Built in RF speech processor. 

• Narrow/ wide filter selection 
onCW. 

• SSEJ joonltor circuit 

. HIT and XIT (transmitter 
increnu'utal tunlngl. 



^Small talk''.. JF shift, Processor, N/W switch, affordable. 



A compact, all soUd-atate HF 
SSB/CW transceiver for mobile 
or fljced base station* covering 
a<5 to 29.7 MHz. 

rS-iaOSE FKATURES: 

• 8010 meters including the new 

10, 18, and 24 MHz bands. 
Receives WWV on 10 MHz. 

• JTS-130SE runs 200 W PEP/160 
iW DC input on 80-15 meters, 
160 W PEP/140 W DC on 12 and 
lo meters. TS4 30V version at 
25 W PEP/20 W DC. all bands, 
[also available. 



^ Digital display, bulU-in. 

• IF shift circuit. 

• Speech Processor built in. 

• Narrow' wide filter selection on 
CW and SSB with optional 

filters. 
■ Automatic SSB mode selection 
(LSB on 40 meters and below, 
USB on 30 meters and uph 
SSB reverse switch provided, 

• RF attenuator, butlt-in. 

• Final ampilller protection circuit 
assures maximum reliabllilv. 



^ W- 




Optional accessories: 

• SP-230 external speaker. 

• VFO-230 external digital \TO 
wilh five memories, digtaj 
display. 

• VFO240 exicmal analog VFO, 

• AT-230 anienna tuner. 

• YG 455C (500 \\/} or YG^55CN 
(250 Hzi CW filter for 

455 kHz IF 

• YK 88C (500 Hz) orYK^SCN 
(270 Hz] CW filter for 

8.83 MHz IR 

• KB*1 deluxe heavyweight knob. 




45 



5^i 



^ 



Output power is reduced if 
abnomnal operating conditions 
occur. For very severe opera- 
tions, optional cooling fan, FA-4, 
is available, TS-130S;widi FA^ 
installed, also available. 

- Effecdve noise blanker. 

• DEmenalJEins: 3-3/4 H x 9-1/2 W x 
11-9/16 D (tnchesj. Weight: 

12.3 lbs, 

* Other features: VOX. CW semi 
break- In with sidetone, one fixed 
channel, and 25 kHz marker. 



Optloiial DFC-230 Digital 
Frequency Controller 
Frequency control in 20'Hz 
steps with UP DOWN micro- 
phone (supplied with DFC 230) 
Four memories and digital 
display (Also operates with 
TS-126S, TS530S. and 
TS^830Sv) 



optional accessories: 

• PS -30 matching power supply 
rrS-130SEJ, 

• KPS-21 power supply 
tTS^130SEK 

• PS'20 power supply ITS- 1 30V). 

• SP-120 external speaker. 

• VFO 120 remote VFO. 

• FA-4 fan unit ITS-130SE). 

• YK 88C (500 Hz\ and YK-88CN 
[270 Hz) CW filters. 

• YK'88SN {L8 kHz) narrow SSB 
niter. 

• AT-130 antenna tun en 

• MB-100 mobile mounting 
bracket. 




\0 



TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 

1111 West Walnut. Complon. California 90220 






RADIO 
BOOKSHOP 



Think Summerfi 



Think Antennas 

VHF ANTENrM HANDBOOK— TbQ new VNf Antenna HatKmook details the 
Itveory, ftosign. and construction o J hundreds of diffefe^t VHP and UHF antsnrvss 
. . .a prairtical lxx>k «ritten for the av&iraQft amateiir who tskss joy in building, 
nol fuli of complex formulae for the desiQn en{] inciter. Packed with fabulous an- 
tenna projects you can build. BK73ea $5.95* 



PRACTICAL AhFTENKAS FOR THE RADIO AMATEUR-A manual [tescnbing 
how to eqitip a ham station «^ith a suitable antenna. A wide r^nge ol antenna 
topics, ^ysiems, and acces^rtes are pr^sent&cj giving the reader Bonre food for 
thought and practical data for constryction, Design^ to ajd the experiencod 
ham and novice as wall. Only BK1015 S9.95,^ 



73 DIPOLE AND LONG-WIRE ANTENNAS- by Edward M. Noll W3FQJ. Thl9 ie 
the first GOltection of ylrtually ev^ry type of wire antenna used by amaloura. In- 
cludes dimensions, conFlguraiions, and detailed construction dala For 73 dll- 
ferent antenna types. Appendices describe the construction of noise brldg^Sn 
line tuners, and data on measuring resonant frequency, velocity faclor, and 
swf BK1016$5 50.* 



ALL ABOUT CUBICAL QUAD ANTENNAS (2nd wlitloii)— BKll9e-The 
"Classic" on Quad design, theory, construction, and operation. New Znd^i:- 
tion comams new fead and matching systems and new data. $5.95 



eEAM ANTENNA HANDBOOK (N*w Sih «Jiiton}^BKli97-ragt beam theory, 
coast ru€l ion and op^mtioo. Information ori mte beams. SWR cufv^ aJX) match- 
I no syslefna. A 'rtiusT for 3«riou5 OXef^ $5.95 



VHFHANOBOOK FOR RADIO AIIATEURS - BK 11 Se— Con tains informatiofion 
FM (heory, opefauo>n ana eq^pcmnt. VHP anteffna design and cortst ruction. 
^tellite^EME a^Kl the n cwcM aolld^eute circuits. $6.96 



THE RA0K3 AMATEUR ANTENNA HAN DBOOK— BK1 tgO-^AIl &xhit Wfn fthtan^ 
nas. beams, tuners, batuns. coax, radials. SWR and towers. Clear and complete 
ififorrrmtHm. 96.95' 



SIMPLE. LOW-COST WIRE ANTENNAS FOR RADIO AMATEURS- BH1200-A1I 
new data and evaryttiing you wani to b^now about low-co&l, mull i-band eniennas, 
ineKpen^ive beams. "Invlslbte'" antennas for hams in "tough^ locations. S6.S5* 



ALL ABOUT CUBICAL QUAD ANTENNAS land edMton)-BK1l96-The 

"Classic" on Quad design, theory, consirucllon, and operation. Mew 2nd edi- 
tion contains new feed and matching systems and new data. $5.95* 

Use the order card in this magazine or itemize your order on a separate pi6ce Of 
paper and mall to; 73 Radio Bookshop • Pet ef borough fsfH 03458. Be sure to In ■ 
elude check or detatied credit card information. No C.O.D. orders accepted^ All 
orders add $t,50 handling first booH, 11,00 each additional book *10.00 per book 
foreign airmail. Please allow 4^ weeks for delivery. Questions rBganding your 
ordef? Pieaae write to Customer Service at the above iiddf&ss. (Prices subj&ct to 
Cfinnge on books not publisfted by 73 Maga^Jnef 





NEW from 



THE 

NEW 

WEATHER 

SATELLITE 

HANDBOOK 




BY DR, RALPH E. TAGCART 

Here is thecompletefv updated and revised edition of the best* 
selling Weather Satellite Handbook— ir^ontaming all the mfor- 
mation on the most sophisticated and effective spacecraft 
now in Of bit. Dr. Taggarl has written this book to serve both the 
experienced amateur satelHte enthusiast and the newcomer. 
The book is an introduction to satellite watching, providing all 
the ififormalion required to construct a complete and highly ef- 
fective ground station. Not just Ideas, but sot^d hardware de* 
signs and all the insiruclions necessary to operate the equip- 
ment are included. For the thousands of expeflmenters who 
are operating stations, the book details all procedures neces- 
sary to modify their equipment for the new series of space- 
craft. Amateur weather satellite activity represents a unique 
blend of interests encompassing electronics, meteorology 
and astronautics. Join the privileged few in watching the spec- 
tacle of earth as seen from space on your own monitoring 
eqtiipmenl. Order BK73S3 S8S5 

SAVE $2.95 



WEATHER SATELLITE 
HANDBOOK (first edition) 

By Dr. Ralph E. Taggart WBSDQT. Valuable information in this 
first edition is not mciuded in Dr. Taggart 's just published 
book, The New Weather Satellite Handbook (see atx^ve). 
Chapters such as "How to Build an Electric Timer for Satellite 
Tracking" and "Building an Automatic Control for the SatelJite 
Receiving Station" will no longer be ava liable when this edl- 
tion is out of print. This is a good entry level text for those 
discovering the exciting new useof weather satellites. Regular 
price: S4 95 SPECIAL PACKAGE PRICE-BOTH BOOKS FOR 
ONLY $10.95, SAVE $2.95! (This offer available only while sup- 
plies last.) Order WS73O0 and receive both editions of the 
Weather Satellite Handbook for only $10.95 (plus S1.00 shipp- 
ing and handling charge). 



'Use the order card in this magazine or iterrrlze your order on a separate piece of paper 
and mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop • PeterborGugh IMH 03458. Be sura to include cheek or 
detailed credit card informa1^o^. Add St.SO first bool^. $1,00 each addHionai booii 
SlO.OOper book foreign airmail Note: Prices subject lochanQeon books not published 
by 73 Magazine Queations mgafding your order? Pfease write to Customer Servfce at 
the above address. Please allowr 4-6 weeks for de^fverv. No C.O.D. orders acceoied For 
Toll Free ordering call i aOO 25S 5473. 



84 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



Save Wlmeal • Call AES for Low KENWOOD Prices 




TS-930S 9-band Xevr/.l5Mhz Re vr....v„*„ 1 1599.00 

AT'930 Automatic antenna tuner „, 199.95 

TS-930S w/AT-930 aufo antenna tun^r. 1799.00 

SP-930 External spM w/audio filters...... 79.95 

YK-ISC-l 500 Hi CW filter {ht IF) 89.95 

rK 88A-1 6 KHz AM filter (1st IF)-^..*.-... 59 J5 

YG-4SSC4 500 Hz CW fHter (2nd IF) 9995 

YK-455CPi-l 250 Hi CW hit&r {2nd IF] ..,. 119.95 




TS-130S 200w PEPS band digital Xcvr S7I9J5 

TS-nOSE Same as TSISOS, tess fan 699-95 

TS-130y 25* PEP 8 band digital Xcw. ., 599.95 

PS' 30 20A [Kjwer supply for TS-ISOS/SE 144.95 

PS'20 4 5A power supply for TS 130V 77,95 

DFC-230 DigJtal freq controller w/mlc 289.95 

SP-40 Compact mobile speaker 25.95 

SP-120 Ejfterrral speaker 41.00 

VFO'230 Digital remote VFO. ..„„.. ....... 309.95 

VFO'120 Analog remote VFO ie4.95 

YK-&8C/ YK-&SCW 500 Hz CW filter ....,., 62 95 

YK-BSCK 270 Hz CW filter,,. 62 95 

m-mu 1 8 KHz SSB filter....... 62.95 

AT-130 ebaiTd antenna tuner „„ 144.95 

MB-100 Mobile mount ..;.,,, 29.95 

MC-30S U-Z dynamic mobile mic . 29.95 

TS-530S 9'bandd(gftal Xcvr.,..,. „„.... S739.95 

DFC-230 Digital freq controller w/mic„,<, 289.a5 

SP-230 External spkr w/audio fibers 71.95 

VFO-230 Digilal fefmjfe VFO. ......... 309.95 

VFO'240 Analog remote VFO„...... „„.... 159.95 

YK'88C/YK-88CW 500 Hz CW lilter 62.95 

YK-e8CN 270 H^ CW [liter ....; 62.95 

YK-88SN 1 B KHz SSB filter..-. 62.95 

AT-230 S band tuner/SWR, pwr meter 194.95 




I 



TS660 6/I0/12/l5mtr3nsceiver.....„.,.,, S699.95 

PS-20 4.5A poiief soppiy * 77.95 

SP-120 External speaker...„,..,,...„..... 41.00 

VOX-4 VOX ymt/speech processor 54.9S 

¥K-agA AM filter....... 49.95 

VK-8EC/YK-e8CW 500 Hz CW filter 62.95 

YK-88CN 270 Hz CW filter... .,.. 62 95 

BC-1./TK I ItemorvbBCK up supply. 20.00 

US-loo Mobile mount .,„,„.„ 29.95 




■ « A 1^ A P 4 ■ 



TS^S30S 9-band digital Xcvr 

DFC-230 Oigilsl freq controlter w/mic. 
SP'230 External spkr w/audfO iilters., 

VFO-230 Digital remote VFO...- 

VFO 240 Anafog remote VFO..... 

YK 88C/YK-8eCW 500 Hi GWfilt (Ist IF) 

YK-88CN 270 Hz CW Niter (1st IF) 

YG-455C 500 Hi CW filter (2ncl IF) 

YG-455CW 250 Hi CW ftlter (2nd IF),„„- 
AT-230 9-band tuner/SWR, pwr rr^elef 

SM-220 Monitof scope.. 

6S-5 Panadaplor kit for TS-520/S ... 

BS-8 Pan kat TS^530S/ 8 305/8208/ 1 SOS 

TL'922A 2N PEP linear (Air Freigbt) 



S34995 

289.95 

71.95 

309.95 

169.95 

62.95 

62J5 

89.95 

113.00 

194.95 

t359.95 

79.95 

79.95 

S1229.95 



The prices shown in this ad are 
suggested by the Manufacturer. 

On most MAJOR items you can 
Save Money with a Bfg AES^ 
Discount. Don't wait! - Call us 
TOLL FREE and get your price. 




TR-2500 3/2.5W 2m FM HT ., 

BH-2 Befthoa](. 

BT-l Alkaline battery case..... 

EP-1 Earphone. , 

LH-2 Leatfier case ,.,..,, 

MS-1 Mob. stand/chgr /supply 
?B-25 Extra 400ma battery... 
SMC- 25 Speaker/ micro phorw 
ST- 2 Desk quick ciigr/supp^ .. 

WS'l Wfislstrap.,..„.. 

TU- 1 Prog ^ub^tone encoder.. 
V6-2530 Amplilter ....,.,. 



J329.95 
,.. 4.95 
11.95 
, 3.90 
37,95 
4295 
3495 
34 95 
89.95 
, 2.70 
.TBA 
99.95 




TR-7730 25w 2m FM Xcvr w/up-down mic $329.95 
TR-7730/TTP 25w 2m FM/up dn TTP mic ... 349.95 




TR 7800 25w 2m FM Kcvr. 
TR-7850 40w 2ffl FM Xcvf,., 
BC-l/TR-1 Mem back-up ps 7800/7850 



v -p B- *« n-v^ m n 



369.95 

419.95 

20.00 




TR^9130 25a ?m SSB/FM/CW Xcvr,, 

Tfl-9130/TTP 25v* 2m SSB/FM/CW Xcwr , 

SP-120 External speaker.., „,„., 



.. 1529.95 
.. 549.95 
,. 41.00 




U lilt g « ^^^^» *Km*i 



•KStVWOae tirfP FM Tmdt<l«QC«TVER 



— <»>. 









TR'840O lOw synth 450 MHz FM Xcvr., 

PS'20 4.5A power supply., 

KPS-7 6A ps; TR 7730/7800/8400/91 30 
KPS42 lOA power supply for TR 7850..,,... 
KPS-Zi 16A pDvyer supply..................... 

MC'46 Up^Jnmc; 7730/8400/9130...., 

R'lOOO 2iD0 KHz- 30 MHi mgrtal recaver..... 
H-600 General coverage receiver........ 

SP-100 External speaker RlOOD/R-600... 

DCK4 cable kit lor R'1000/R-60D, 

A( i os5ories: 

IAC'60-N-4 4pm deluxe micropbone 

MC-60-S'6 5'pin dlx mic w/up-dwn switch 
MC-60'S-8 Spin dlx mic w/yp-dwn switcb 
IIIIC-50 Hi/l0'2desk microphone.. 
MC-30S Lo-Z dynamic mobile mic 
MC-35S Hi-2 dynamic mobtle mic....,,.,, 

HC-10 Digital world clock .,,„. 

HS-4 Headphones ......,.,,>,.. 

HS-5 Deluxe headphones 

HS'6 lightweight headphones.. 

PC 1 Phone patch 

HD~20 DC-500 Mbz 20w/50w dummy load 

SP-40 Compact rriohtie speaker 

DM-81 Dap meter ., „.... 



$499.95 
77.95 
83.95 
94 95 
124.95 
49J5 

$499.95 

399.95 

47.95 

6.00 



$ 



r* At t«4 *#T -- 



b d A ^ ^ A I 



■VVVtVa-VHI'l 



■ -tl" ¥**♦*■- 



69.95 

74.95 
74.95 
47.95 
29.95 
29.95 

103.95 
19.95 
41.95 
2995 
62.95 
19.95 
25.95 

103.95 





Use your CREDIT CARD! 

E«X-P.A"N-D-E-D WATS PHONE HOURS 

Our Milwaukee Headquarters wilt answer the 
Nationwide WATS line 1-800-559-0411 unltt 8 
pm (Milwaukee time) Monday thru Thursday 

Please use WATS line for Placing Orders 

For otrier mformatJon, eic please use R&guiar Ime 



Call Toll Free: 1 -800-558-04 1 1 



HOURS: Mon, Tue, Wed & 
Fri 9-5:30; Thurs* 9-8; Sat 9-3 

*Us Vegas ^ Florida stores NOT open Thursday evenmgs 



In Wisconsin (outside Milwaukee Metro Area) 

1 -800-242-51 9S 



T 



I 



dllJJk 



tnc. 



4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue; Milwaukee, Wl 53216 - Phone (414) 442-4200 



WICKLIFFE, Ohio 44092 

28940 Euclid Avenue 

Phone (216) 585 7388 

Ohio WATS 1-800-3S2- 0290 



— AES BRANCH STORES— 

ORLANDO, Fla. 32803 CLEARWATER, Fla. 3351 5 
621 Commonwealth Ave. 1898 Drew Street 

Phone [305} 894-3238 Phone (813) 461 4267 

Fla. WATS 1-800-432^9424 Ho In-State WATS 



Outside Ohio 1-800- 32 1-3594 Oirtside Fla, 1-800- 32M9 17 



No riationwLde WATS 



LAS VEGAS. Nev.89loe 

1072 1^. «anclio Drive 

Phone (702) 647^3114 

No In-State WATS 

Outside Nev. 1800-634^6227 



Associate Store 

CHICAGO, Illinois 60630 

ERICKSON COMMUNICATIONS 

5456 N. Milwaukee Avenue 

Ptione (312) 631-5181 
Outside ILL l-SOO-SZl-SSOZ 



73 Magazine • July J 982 aS 



mim 




^416 



WE'RE ROLIN 

IM CRYSTALSI 

2 Meter Crystals — $3.95 each 
(10 or More — S3»50 each) 

Quick Delivery 



We Stock Crystals For: 

Clegg Drake Icom 

Kenwood Midland Regency 
Standard Wilson Yaesu 



Roiln Distributors 

P,0. Box 436 Department 7 
Dunellen,N.J.088l2 

201-469-1219 



Lsfayette Tempo VHF Eng 
(Custom Crystal Orders Accepted.) Precision Cut Land Mobiles Available 



REACH OUT! 

VoCom s 5/8 wave gain antenna: 

* Dramatically txwsts reception. 

• Gives your hand-held full quieting from places 
you're nearly dead in with a rubber duck. 

Here's Why It Works So Well: 

In order for a 5/8 wave antenna to provide its full appar- 
ent gain over a standard 1/4 wave whip, it fnust not 
only appear as 5/8 wavelength at 2 meters, but *t 
must also utilize a ground plane Since you can't al- 
ways operate your hand-held from a car roof or other 
metal base. VoCom found a way to emulate the 
ground plane. 

At ngh! Js the circuit that does it, The coil that 
doubles as a base spring is tap fed, and a 
matched capacitor compietes the reso- 
nant circuit. 

The result is an antenna that, fully ex- 
tended, displays better than 1.5:1 VSWR 
across the entire 144-148 MH^ band. 
And. when collapsed, it is the operat- 
ing equivalent of a rubber duck. (With 
8 of the 10 sections extended, it 
is a 5/8 wave antenna at 
220 MH2-> 



A 






How to 

tell a VoCom 

5/8 wave 

antenna from 

its imitators: 

this cutaway shows 

the base spring/coi), 

its feed tap. and the 

resonant circuit 

capacitor. Or you can 

simply check the VSWR— 

your transmitter will 

appreciate the differ^^ce. 



BASE 
SPRING/COIL 



TAP FEED 



CAPACITOR 



VoCom 



•30 

PRODUCTS CORPORATION 

55 East Palatine Road 
(312) 459-3680 Prospect Heights, IL 60070 



FTIOI TS520 TS820 
FILTER CASCADING 



Probably the most popular units ever pro- 
duced ^ these solidly buiU Iransceivers were 
twilt to LAST If you can live without gadgetry, 
why replace your reliable time-tested rig 
with a costly new model? Especially since 
you can easNy make your receiver equal in 
selectivity and ultimate reiection to any now 
on the market with an inexpensive 
Foji-Tango RIter Cascadir^g Krt! 
CONSIDER THESE FEATURES 

• Easy inslaltation - 30 minute average. 

• No dnllrng. switching, align menL 

• Results of 16 poles of filtering: 

Rlter Shape Factor a^ htgli as 1,19, 
Ultimate Reiection better than lOOdB. 
Works wonders on SSB; improves CW. 

• Compensates for RUer Insertion loss. 

• Complete instructions, clear diagrams. 

• No RX audio impairment. TX unaffected. 

• Fits all models of Series - any letter. 

• 10% off if any four are ordered at once. 

TS520 Series Order Kit No. 520K S70 

TS820 Series: Order Kit No. 820K $70 

FTlOl Series (notZD): Order Kit No. 4K. .S75 
FT1 Ot 2D Series: Order Kit No. 4K-ZD . . . S75 
Prices tnciude shipping \o U.S. S Canada; 

Overseas Air S5. Flonda Sales Tax: 4% 
Ail kits include a genuine 6- pole top^qualily 
FT Filter, improved cascading/mini-amp cir- 
cuit board, ail needed parts, cables, and 
detailed instructions. 

In addition to the above, Fox-Tango features 
cascading kits for the FT-901/2 ($65), FR- 
tOt ($55). Heaihkit $B104A ($60), Also a 
wide line of SSB, CW, AM. and special filters 
for Yaesu, Kenwood, Drake R4Cafvd 7*Line. 
Heathkit, and Collins 75S-3B/C. 

NEW! TSB30S and R820 KFTS 

TS830 and Rd20 owners wtK» have replaced 

their 1st and 2nd IF filters with a Matched 

Pair of 2.1 KHz Fox-Tango filters enthuse 

asticaiiy report the to! lowing: 

", , , V&T mw works as / drmrmd ft should " 

" Results aw aimost unb&ilevabiQ ..." 

". . Spectacufar SSB RX performance . " 

" . J no iortg&r need a CW Ftttm. . . . '* 

(Names on Request) 

Tests prove that high quality Fox-Tango 8- 

pole discrete-unit Crystal Filters a/e notably 

superior to the original units, espedalfy the 

modest 455 KHz second IF ceramic unit 

Substitution of Fox*Tango filters result in a 

bandwidth of I.QKHz at -6dB, a shape 

factor ot 1 .2, and Ultimate Rejection of at 

least llOdBI 

(Independent Report available upon request.) 
Regular Price: S55 4- $1 25- $180 + shipping 
INTRODUCTORY PRICE (Complete Kit), . .$150 
Includes Matched Pair of Fox-Tango Filters 
All cables, parts, detailed instructions 

10% Quantity Discount Jlpplies 
Genuine Fox-Tango crystal filters are guar* 
anteed for ONE YdftR Beware of ctieap 
imitations; they are no bargain! Don't be 
fooled. 

GO FOX-TANGO — TO BE SUREJ 
ORDER by Mail or Telephone. Pay by Visa, 
MC, M.O.. CJieck (US$). Cash, or C.O.D. 

AUTHORIZED EUROPEAN AGENTS 
Scandenavia: MtCROTEC. Makedien 26, 

3200, Sandefjofd, NORWAY 
0\her INGOIMPEX. Poslfach 24 49. 

[>e070. inflolstadt, W GERMANY 



FOX TANGO CORPORATION 
Boxl5944SW PalmB^^-f^ ^L33406 
Phone i-J05'6<xi-:iC}37 ^^23 



86 73Magazme * July J 982 



Is f his new KDK FM 2030 

the best 2 meter FM radio in the world? 




h IK Vi 



1Ar^Jf 



FtsA 






VWM 



SPO 



A^B 



RiJiif/ 



VOLJP*VVR HJ»+ 



5IE/*»VVft 



TOMB «i_ca 




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That's a pretty strong claim considering the 
competition. 

Let's look at some of the features . - . 

• KDK continues the tradition of being the ultimate in VHP FM mobile 
operations. We make maximum use of multiple function, multiple shaft 
controls and only three sets of knobs are located on the front paneK 
Still many new features have been added, such as digital RtT, reverse 
button, memory channel readout number and morel 

•The new KDK 4 bit microprocessor chip has in-house developed 
software which makes all these new features possible. Plug in modules 
are used for CTCSS tone and diode matrix duplexing. 

•We gave it a very heavy textured paint finish on the case and mounting 
bracket that is highly resistant to scratching! No more mtcro-thin paint 
fmishes! 

• Modern styled front panel with dials intelligently arranged so you can 
best utilize the multi-function, easy to handle controls. 

• Good audio with the famous KDK audio output capability of 1.S 
watts . . . you can't blow out our audio tC! 

• RF power is a good, clean no spurious signal of 25 watts on high and 
5 watts (adjustable] on low. 

« Frequency coverage 143.005 ^ T43.99S mhz. S/N bitter than 35 db 
at 1 uv input. Better than .2 uv at 12 db SINAD, Squelch sensitivity 
better than .15 uv. Bandwidth at -6db: ±6 khz, at -60db: ITBkhz. 
Image ratio better than 70db. Double superhetrodyne. Transmitter uses 
variable reactance frequency modulation with maximum deviation set 
at ±5khz. 

• Nicads for memory retention built in, nothing extra to buy. Disconnect 
the FM203D from the power source and the memories remain! 



^ ^ * s 



$309 



INTRODUCTORY PRICE! 

Includes Tone Pad Microphone 

and all accessories. Shipping: $5,00 eastern U.S.A. S7. 50 western U.S.A. 

• Easy to use mobile mount with instant disconnect knobs for fast, 
simple removal DC Cable and mounting hardware, spare fuse, external 
speaker piug and complete simplified instruction book includes circuit 
diagrams and even complete alignment instructions! No extras to purchasel 

• Control functions: Select memories, show memory channel number, 
or select memories and show frequency of channel, or dial frequencies 
with two speed selectable control. Instant choice of either 5 or 100 khz 
tuning steps, Programmabte band scan limits and memory scan. 

• Frequency shown in 5 bright LED digits^ tED indicator shows when 
signal is received (unsquelched), LED indicator shows transmit. 

•Modern LED bar meter shows signal strength of received signal and 
on transmit shows relative output power. 

• Microphone includes tone pad, and up and down buttons to change 
dial frequency or memory channels, 

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separately. 

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rotary switch frequency selection for full "eyes-on-the-road" mobile 
operation. 

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NOW YOU HAVE JUST SOME OF THE FEATURES , . . IT'S UP TO YOU TO DECIDE! 



WRITE FOR BROCHURE - DEALER INOUtRIES INVITED! 

Warranty mformiation available from your dealer or direct 

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RTry LOOP 



HarcL Leakey, M\D. WA3AJR 
4006 Wmiee Road 
Handallstown MO 2U33 

! somehow find H hard to be- 
lieve, but this column marks the 
beginning of the sixth year of 
RTTY Loop! Bach in 1977, when I 
started this column in a local 
club newsletter, the most exotic 
Item I was asked about was the 
Teletype* Model 28, or occa- 
sionally the Model 33. Now, in 
just a half-dozen years, the bulk 
of the questions concern adapt- 
ing any of the myriad of person* 
ai computers to RTTY, 

Many readers, having sensed 
my affection for the Motorola 
6800 series of computers, have 
asked about programs directed 
towards that line. In the past, I 
have featured quite a few indi- 
vidual programs which allow re- 
ceiving or transmitting RTTY on 
a 6800 system. One feature of- 
ten requested, and certainly 
available on many commercial 
RTTY terminals, is the so-called 
"split-screen" capability. This rs 
the display of both the received 



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OCraO It= A>I0 GOTO SO 
O&JO PRlilT **L.* 
0040 BDTO lO 
OO;^ PRINT *H* 

ocNbo eaTQ to 

Fig- r. 



STflPf JS« IMPUT 
CtPA lO 

LDAA 'L 
JSR DUtPUT 
PRA START 
MtGH LDAA 'H 

J5» DUTPLft 
BRA 9TAHT 



signal and transmit buffer on 
the screen at the same time. 

Let's take a look at what such 
a program requires, and over the 
next few sessions see if we can 
develop a reasonable technique 
for implementing a split-screen 
RTTY terminal. In doing this, I 
will try to keep within my design 
philosophy, which is; If it can be 
done in software, do it. While 
this sometimes increases the 
complexity of the written code. I 
believe that in the long run work- 
ing out a logical software solu- 
tion to problems provides both a 
straightforward method of prob- 
lem-solving and a cost-effective 
approach for the ham on a bud* 
get. 

The first step will be to define 
what this terminal will need to 
do. Let*s require only the ability 
to handle 60-wpm Murray (Bau- 
dot) code; other speeds wiil not 
be hard to add, and a given code 
set will keep things simple for 
the time being. J would like the 
top half of the screen to display 
the received signal, with me 
most recent lines being main- 
tained, and the bottom half to 
show the transmit buffer. You 
should be able to fill the trans- 
mit buffer while receiving and 
continue to add to it even while 
transmitting. 

I am going to have to be rather 
specific on the hardware re- 
quirements. We will be writing 
for a Motorola 6800-based com- 
puter, with the I/O block located 
at $8000, using the old 
''SWTPC" standards. A video* 



Fig. 2. 



INTBIC Oft Exit POINT FOfi pflOGRAM 



tHIseASIO BLOCK COMTAINS A^Y DISCRETE 
PROGRAM STEP TH*T IS DIRECTLY P£^FDftUE{> 



A 

/ \ 

/ \ 

/ \ 

( > 

\ / 

\ / 

\ / 

V 



THIS IS THE COKDlTlOltfAL BLOCK THAT &IVE* 
THE P^OCRAII 9TS PO*tt^ IT ALLOWS L061C 
FtO* tt) ^RAMCH IN EtTMEH Of TWO OlRECTIOMS. 
BASED ON A OlNAf^T DECaSlOII. 



Fig. 3. 



mapped display wiil be a nnust. 
Users of "smart" terminals, 
such as the Soroco IQ-120, can 
position the cursor anywhere 
using escape sequences, and 
this could be used to implement 
a split-screen display. However, 
in order to seiectiveiy scroll the 
screen, manipulation of data 
will be required directly, and this 
will necessitate the type of ac- 
cess a video board allows. While 
I will be writing for a GIMIX 
board, the program should be 
general enough to allow any of 
the popular video displays to 
work. 

Now, on to the program. In the 
past, I have received some let- 
ters critical of my rapid entry in- 
to source codes. It seems that 
all of you are not as comfortable 
as I in the realm of LDAA and 
CPX Instructions. * therefore 
shall wade in from the shallow 
end, although I prefer diving 
right in. Let's start by looking at 
the logic involved for this pro- 
gram. 

Well, not just yet. You see, 
that*s been another criticism. 
Flowcharts, those indispens- 
able tools of the computer pro- 
grammef, are just so much gob- 
bledygook to a good number of 
you. I have, in the past, 
presented several flowcharts 
without much in the way of 
background, I shall attempt to 
rectify this omission herewith, 

A flowchart is a map. dia- 
gram, or skeleton of a computer 



r STAB? J 




HURflAT 



COH^EFtT TO 
A$Cll 



OCT s<'CKt£h 
POliyTEn 



CuARACTEFi 



IS 



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program, depending on how you 
look at it. Let's take a rather sim- 
ple example. I say something 
like, "Take a number and call it 
A. Is it greater than 10? If so» 
print an H Jf not, print an L Now 
do it again." This sequence de- 
fines a logic sequence. Many of 
you familiar with BASIC, the 
rather universal higher-level lan- 
guage used in personal comput- 
ers, could write rather rapidly 
from this description the pro- 
gram shown in Fig* I.This would 
be one way to accomplish the 
task. Another is shown in Fig. 2, 
which is a 6800 assembly-lan- 
guage implementation of the 
same simple-minded job. I think 
you can see that there is quite a 
difference, and can imagine fur- 
ther differences when the pro- 
cess Is extended to 6502-, 8080-, 
Z-80-. Pascal-. FORTRAN-, or 
APL-speaktng computers. What 
is needed is some universal way 
to represent the logic sequence. 
That Is the flowchart- 
Steps in a flowchart are repre- 
sented by boxes, each of which 
contains one logical process* 
This process may be a simple 
one-byte instruction or an entire 
subroutine. It doesn't matter, so 
long as it can be visualized as a 
unit. Different shaped boxes are 
frequently used to represent dif- 
ferent types of processes. Three 
of those are shown in Fig. 3, with 
their definitions. There are many 
others, but these three will suf- 
fice for this month's flowchart. 




POiMTER 



PLACE 
CHARACtCR 




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m 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



SUMMER VACATION SPECIALS 

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73 Magazine • July. 1982 89 



ji 



MH^ 



A^ 



The boxes are connected by 
lines, through which logic flow 
Is presumed to flow in a top-to- 
bottom, r{ght-to*teft direction. If 
flow is contrary to these direc- 
tions, arrows are used to define 
such progression. 

With this under our belts, let's 
take a look at the flowchart in 
Fig. 4. Entering at START, we inv 
mediately come to a decision. If 
there is a bit on the RTTY input 
pin, then 3 character is at>out to 
coma in. if not, the Eocai key- 
board can be checked for input. 
If no data is found there, the pro- 
gram returns to check the RTTY 
once again and the loop contin* 
ues. 

tf a character has been typed 
on the local keyboard, it is In- 
serted into a buffer and dis^ 
played on the lower half of the 
screen. Later on, we will add 
some checking for special char- 
acters which will control the pro- 
gram or other features. For now, 
let's just be happy to fill the buf- 
fer. 



Received RTTY characters 
are also stuffed onto the screen, 
but on the top half. During re- 
ceipt of the RTTY character, 
however, there is quite a bit of 
time when the computer would 
be idling, watting for these long, 
2l*ms pauses to go by. During 
these pauses, as shown in Fig. 
5, the keyboard is checked once 
again. Input is allowed here, too, 
and again placed on the screen 
and stuffed into the buffer. 

All this inputting and buffer- 
ing requires a raft of pointers 
and protocols. Placing a charac- 
ter on the screen will require 
pufEIng a set of pointers from 
storage, placing the character 
on the screen, updating the 
pointers, checking to see if a 
new iine must be started, and 
possibly scrolling that segment 
of the display. And all this must 
be accomplished within the 
wink of an eye. 

Now that we have the road 
map, let's begin our journey. The 
program we will use is an imple- 



rr>entatlon of an output routine 
which will serve as the window 
into the RTTY lerminal we willbe 
building. Before I go into the Ins 
and outs of the program itself, 
maybe I'd better ex plain some of 
the rather peculiar GIMIX sys- 
tem function calls. 

Like most operating systems, 
IheGMXBUG monitor features a 
variety of routines which may be 
used to input or output charac- 
ters or manipulate data in vari- 
ous ways. Unlike most, which 
use subroutine calls to access 
such routines (JSR ADDR or 
$BD Snnnn), GMXBUG provides 
fof the use of the software inter- 
rupt (SWI or S3F) instruction to 
create a set of two-byle pseudo- 
codes. In the typical sense, one 
may write the code $3F S10 to in- 
put a character, for example, 
rather than the MIKBUG style 
$BD$E1AG(JSRINEEE). 

Moreover, GMXBUG features 
several routines not offered in 
other 6800 monitors, many of 
which demonstrate a high ievel 



f illTI» J 



SET UP 




YES 



PftOCI:SS HYBD 



•:^EC•tl^t*lt ' 
COLWTtH 




TE« 



( "" ) 



Fig. 5. Murray input deiay rou- 
tine. 

of utility. While these routines 
may be written in for systems 
based on another monitor, as 
long as they are here, why not 
use them? In order to allow the 
assembler to handle these two- 
byte pseudocodes, I write them 
as double-byte data statements 
(FOB) and call them as such. 









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fig. 6, 



73 Magazine • July, 1962 




KLM's KT-34XA 

Outperforms 1[lU commercially available tribariders and many monobanders, too! 

KLM's KT-34XA TR I BANDER is the 2nd generation of a unique new series of antennas designed to 
provide superior broadband coverage on 20, 15, and 10 meters. The combination of lossless linear 
loading and hi-Q air capacitors enables the KT-34XA to outperform all commercial available tribanders 
and meet or exceed the performance of a conventional stacked monoband system. The lower weight 
and windload of a single antenna mean reduced tower and rotator requirements. Thus, overall system 
costs can be kept to a minimum while enjoying the best of monobander-fype performance. 

KLM's field proven KT-34A is the heart of the "XA" modeL The boom length of the "XA", however, 
has been doubled, and one tri-resonant and one full size 10 meter element have been added. These 
changes increase the gain to 11-11.3 dBd on lOM, 9-9.5 dBd on IBM, and 8.5-9 dBd on 20M. Two 
driven elements are used to make the KT-34XA unusually broadbanded (a concept applied to many KLM 
antennas). Gain is virtually flat across each band except for 10 meters which has been optimized for the 
DX'er, 28-29 MHz. The chart below shows the remarkable performance qualities of the KT-34XA. 




KT-34XA GAIN vs. VSWR 



MHz 14.0 




MHz 21.0 A 



.3 .4 .5 Mhz 28,0 .1 .2 .3 .4 .5 6. .7 .8 .9 29. A .2 



KLM 

P.O. Box 816, Morgan Hill, CA 95037 

{408)779-7363 



73 Magazine * July,19B2 91 






SU«T1tA.CT 
FH LOCATE 



lis 



Cfl 



CLC*» cawKt 



LF 



YES 



( €X1T J 



HD 



ftlHIlt OUTCHR 



tfl 



n^SET SCREEN 
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ȣLL 



HQ 




AOO «D TD 
«Et HtXT 
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SCt^EFN JP' 
dH£ ROW 



VES 



FF 



IHC MOW COUilT 



FILL LAST 
UNt mitri 
fiPiCES 



FILL iCnEEN 
I WITH SPACER 



( ""' ) 



ND 



C "^ ) 



C ^'"^ J 



TCS 






«5 



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irf I 



C 



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>-*?o 



mo 



PUT CHART 
AT LOCATE 




NO 



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C "" ) 



F/g. 7. 



Routines used In this month's 
program Jnctude: 

AODAX (S3F04)"Adds the 
contents of accumulator A to 
the contents of the index regis- 
ief and places the result in the 
index register. The addition is 
unsigned. The former contents 
of the index register are lost. 

SUBAC ($3F06)— Subtracts 
the contents of accumulator A 
from the contents of the index 
register and places the result in 
the index register. The subtrac- 
tion is unsigned. The former 
contents of the index register 
are lost. 

MOVER {$3 FOE)— A general 
purpose block^mover routine. 



Moves the contents of memory 
starting at the address in 
BEG1K1 ($A002) through the ad- 
dress ]n END1 {$A004) Inclusive 
to memory starting at the ad- 
dress in BEGIN2 ($A014). 
Checks for overlap of source 
and destination areas, ff neces- 
sary, the move Is done bacMo- 
front. 

OUTCHR ($3F11)— Conven^ 
tlonal character output to the 
video-driver routines of the 
ASCII character contained in 
the A accumulator. 

Enough background? OK, 
let's see how we can chop a 
screen in half. The listing in Fig* 
6 is a demonstration program to 



MM HELP 




I need manuals and/or sche- 
matics for the following: 

• SG92 A/U rf sweep generator 

• Nems Clarke receiver 2501 B 

• Nems Clarke signal display 
SOU 350-9 

• Nems Clarke Range Extender 
REU300B 

• Tektronix Model 564 (early 
model) oscilloscope mainframe 

I will pay reasonable costs for 

92 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



copying and postage. 

Bruce Owlngs WA49PV 

2483 Gwinn Drive 

Norcross GA 30071 

Vm looking for info on con- 
verting the Icom 22S to the new 
20-kHz band plan- 
Joe Ciskowski 
Rt. 1 , Box 556 
Bonners Ferry ID 83805 



do this. The flowchart in Fig. 7 
can be followed step by step, to 
see how the listing was devel- 
oped. 

To begin with, we shall recog- 
nize that certain non-printing 
characters are useful, so tet's 
screen for them. A carriage re- 
turn, line feed, bell, form feed, 
and backspace, each in turn is 
checked for. Should any of them 
be found, a branch to a corre- 
sponding routine is dona, and 
we will cover those later. Any 
other GontfOl character we will 
ignore for now. 

The handling of printing char- 
acters is straightforward. The 
address of the next character to 
be printed is stored at a spot we 
will call "LOCATE" So, we get 
that address, place the charac- 
ter there, increment to the next 
spot, and store it. Now, a line 
counter, call It "COUNT." fs In- 
cremented to see where on the 
line we are. If at the end, calls to 
the carriage-return and line-feed 
routines Initiate a new line. 
Which routines are these? Why; 
the same routines that a car- 
riage return and line feed call up, 
no? Yes! And I bet you thought 
this was going to be compli* 
cated. 

Now let*s take a look at some 
of those special routines. 
What's thai I hear? OK, carriage 
return, you first, What is a car- 
riage return after all? A resetting 
to zero on the current line, that's 
all. So, to Implement a carriage 
return, first we load the current 
location Into the index register, 
then the character count (where 
on the line are we?) into the A ac- 
cumulator. Subtract the two, us- 
ing that SUB AX routine, and you 
have the beginning of the ttne. 
Store that as the new location, 
clear the tine count itself, and 
the carriage return is done. 

Une feed? No, let me save you 
for last. How about something 
easy, like the bell This non- 
printing character rings a soft- 
ware bell In the G1MIX system. 
So let's just send It out through 
the regular character output. 
Well, so much for that one. 

The form feed is used to clear 
the screen, and it is a neat char< 
acter; let's see why. First, we set 
the character location to the 
first one in the screen sector, 
clear the character count and 
set the row counter to the first 
row. Next a loop is entered to 
load the entire screen window 
with spaces ($20). When that*s 
done, the screen is reset and 
clear. 



Backspace is also not so 
hard. For now, let's prohibit 
backspacing past the beginning 
of the line up onto the previous 
line. So, we check the character 
counter and if it's zero we don't 
backspace. If it's OK, just decre- 
ment the count, store it, decre- 
ment the location, store it, and 
put a space where we are now. 
Like 1 said, not so hard. 

OK gang, time to roll up our 
sleeves and look at the line feed* 
If we take it one step at a time. It 
shouldn't be too hard. We have 
been keeping track of current 
row on the screen, as well as 
character position on the line. 
So first we must check the row 
counter and, if the current row is 
the last on the screen, initiate a 
scroll. Hang onto that one for a 
second. If not a scroll, it is easy. 
With eighty characters per line, 
adding eighty to the current lo- 
cation gives the corresponding 
spot on the line below. Incre- 
ment the row number, add 
eighty to the location, store all 
this new data, and we are done. 

Now, about that scroll, let's 
look. First, we find the start of 
the second screen line; this will 
become the top line after the 
scroll This address is stored In 
BEGIN1 for use by the MOVER 
routine. The end of the screen 
defines ENDI, and the data on 
display is shifted up one line. 
Now one more task needs to be 
taken care of. The last line on 
the screen Is filled with spaces, 
clearing it for new data. 

Note, by the way, that the car* 
rlage return does not initiate a 

scroll nor does a tine fe^ reset 
position within a line. It takes 
both! 

The data and storage needed 
for the program is situated at 
the end of the instructions. I've 
got to indicate here that there is 
nothing sacred about using the 
bottom thirteen tines, as shown 
here, or the whole eighty charac- 
ters across. Ctiange it to the 
middle sixteen tines with thirty- 
two characters If you are nostal- 
gic. Versions of this same rou- 
tine will be used for several win- 
dows in the RTTY terminal 
which we will be building up. 

As time goes on, we will con- 
tinue to develop the routines 
needed, one by one, for this full- 
featured RTTY terminal. Next 
month, though, I'll take a crack 
at some of the mail from readers 
which has been piling up on my 
desk. That and more, in RTTY 
Loop to come. 



MBA READERT 

A NAME YOU SHOULD KNOW 

■ What does MBA mean? It stands for Morse-Baudot and ASCII 
^What does the MBA Reader do? The RO model (reader only) uses 
a 32 character alphanumeric vacuum fluorescent display and 
takes cw or tty audio from a receiver or tape recorder and visually 
presents it on the display. 

The copy moves from right to left across the screen, much like 
the Times Square reader board, ts the AEA model MBA Header 
different from other readers? It certainly is! It is the first to give the 
user 32 characters of copy (without a CRT), up to five words at one 
time, it can copy cw u p to 99 wpm and Baudot at 60-67-75 and 1 00 
wpm. Speeds in the ASCII mode are 110 and hand typed 300 
baud. The expanded display allows easy copy even during high speed reception. 

The AEA model MBA has an exclusive automatic speed tracking feature. If you are copying a signal at 

3-5 wpm and tune to a new signal at 90 wpm, the MBA catches the increased speed without loss of copy. 

The M BA Reader allows a visual display of your fist and improves your code proficiency. It is compact, 

in size, and has an easily read vacuum fluorescent display. 

The Reader operates from an external 12 VDC source, This allows for portable/mobile or fixed 
operation* 

Check the AEA model MBA Reader at your favorite dealer and see all the features in this new" 
equipment If your dealer cannot supply you, contact ^ ^^ ^ 

Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. mm El ^n Brings you the 

^RO. Box 2160. Lynnwood, WA 98036 Call 206/775-7373 #^Hii#^ Break tlirough! 

Prices and specif icaitons subject to change without notice or obligation ^2 




» 

I 




DIRECnON FINDING? 



* Doppler Direction 



it 



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Kits or 

Assembled Units 
135-165 MHz 
Standard Range 







New Technology (patent pending) converts any VHF FM fece^ver into an advanced 
Doppler Direction Finder Simply plug into receiver's antenna and external speaker 
jacks. Use any four omnidirectional antennas. See June 198t issue of 73 for technical 
description. Kits from $270. Assembled units and antennas also available. Call or 
write for full details and prices- 



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*?//> 



General Communication 

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Call or Write *^^ 

JAN CRYSTALS 

P.O.Box 0^017 

Ft. Myera, Fl. 33906-6017 

AllPtiones (811} 938-2397 



^S## Usr Of AttvBftfS^rs ott ^ge J 14 



73 Magazine • July, 1982 M 





^fbR ^ ^rbit 



-^ 





ORBIT is the Official Journal for the 
Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation 
(AMSAT), P.O. BOX 27, Washington, DC 
20047. Please write for application. 

For a FREE SAMPLE COPY please 
send S1 to cover First class Postage 
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94 73MagBzin0 • July, 1982 



Resd&r Sefvice for facing page t^45^ 



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PRICES FOB. 
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PRICES SUBJECT TO 

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TVRO: Georgia Style 

one man's junk is another man's antenna 



Timothy Danre/ NdRK 
7 J Magazine Staff 

1'his is not the typical 
i 73 construction article. 
Herman "Tex" Friedsam's 
satellite TV antenna is not 

offered in kit form, nor are a 
complete set of plans avail- 
able. 

just in case you still want 



to give this project a try, 
here are some of the parts 
you will need: the magne- 
sium bell housing far a heli- 
copter's propeller, one line 
shaft from a cotton gin, and 
don't forget the swivel-type 
hitch from a cultivator. 
With those items acquired, 
it is time to continue the 
search, this time looking for 



a worm gear reducer (Tex 
salvaged his from a brick 
factory's conveyor); youMl 
also need a frame for the 
drive mechanism — try the 
local hammer mill. 

What may sound like a 
hopelessly incompatible 
pile of junk has become an 
engineering masterpiece in 
the small town of Marshall- 




Tex WA40PY with his home-brew dish, 
96 73Magazme • July, 1982 



ville, Georgia. Tex, whose 
ham call is WA40PY, ap- 
proached this project like 
he does most things. Using 
his experience as a textile 
plant engineer he started 
with an idea but not a plan. 
After collecting several of 
the key components, he set- 
tled on a design for a 
15.2788a-foot-diameter par- 
abolic reflector. The 18 
hours of research and plan- 
ning were among the proj- 
ect's easiest work. Con- 
struction of the frame, 
which began in the spring of 
1979, took almost 200 
hours. Realizing that pai^^ 
staking accuracy results fn 
a better picture when you 
are done, Tex and a friend 
each spent12 hours making 
a plywood template of the 
antenna's curved surface. 
Two thousand feet of elec- 
trical conduit and PVC pipe 
later, the frame was ready 
to cover with aluminum 
screen. The basic dish, 
when completed, weighed 
only 425 pounds. 

Tex's research pointed 
out the imperfections of the 
polar mount, the traditional 
way a dish scans the hori- 




The antenna^s hub is constructed around a helicopter's 
Dfopeller bell houstng. An octagonal frame, eight feet 
-n diameter, extends outward, supporting the antenna's 
surface. 




The feed assembly allows the horn polarization to be 
changed via a TV rotor and there is provision for very fine 
adjustments of the horn location. This allows the receive 
signal to be maximized. 



zon. By building a frame 
that could be moved hori- 

fontalfy as well as in a polar 
arc, the WA40PY antenna 
zan be accurately posi- 
tioned with a minimum of 
fudging. The major support- 
ing axis is the only part of 
the system fabricated by an 
Dutsider. A 1y2-borsepower 
motor used to turn the dish 
is the only component that 
ivas purchased new. The 
rest of the parts were sat- 
t/aged from local scrap 
Diles. Being the owner of a 
Hardware and variety store 
didn't hurt, nor did Tex 
mind using "scrap" from his 
Drother-irhlaw's grain mill. 

Patience seems to be the 
Tiain rule behind this proj- 
ect When it came time to 
Fine-tune the antenna's sur- 
face, Tex spent 61 hours, 
.Tiuch of it with a flashlight 
and a piece of shiny alumi- 
num. When he was finished, 
the dish's focal point was 
rio bigger than a nickel. As 
Tex got around to building 
a feed assembly, he decid- 
ed that there was noth- 
ing suitable on the commer- 
::ial market, so he designed 
his own, It worked so well 
that he has started to man- 
ufacture them for other 
hobbyists. 

By April of 1981, almost 
:wo years after he started 
lonstruction, Tex was ready 
:o give his system a try. The 



electronics, like the anten- 
na, were home-built The 
first pictures, in Tex's 
words, were "lousy images 
of a Snoopy cartoon/' To- 
day, 'lousy" pictures have 
been replaced by clear re- 
ception and satellite tele- 
vision has become part of 
the Friedsam family life. 
The receiver has been built 
into an attractive piece of 
living room furniture and 
the dish, which sits across 
the driveway, moves some- 
what mysteriously by re- 
mote control. 

Tex carefully document- 
ed the construction of his 
system, keeping track of 
the materials and time he 
used For instance, 1700 
3/8-inch sheet-metal screws 
were needed to apply the 
aluminum screening, and it 
took 29 hours to install a 
shielded underground ca- 
ble between the house and 
the dish. 

Along the way there were 
many sources of frustra- 
tion; for example, the frame 
broke when it was ninety 
percent complete. Tuning 
up the microwave circuitry 
required a signal generator 
that none of the local scrap 
piles could offer Tex built 
his own, using a klystron 
tube. 

Perhaps the most impres- 
sive fact concerning Tex's 
accomplishment was that 



he had never seen a TVRO 
installation and he had nev- 
er been within a mile of a 
large parabolic antenna. 
Working from theory and 



the scrap piles of Marshall- 
ville, Georgia, he has built a 
functional monument to 
the home-brew spirit of 
radio ■ 




The dish, which is almost 76 ^eet in diameter, has a frame 
built from PVC pipe and electrical conduit The supporting 
bar, which spans the dish, is the only piece that Tex did not 
fabricate himself. 

73 Magazine • July, 1982 t7 




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S6 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



Htj 




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MAN INDUSTRIES 

SATELUIE PRODUCTS DIVISION 

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Toll Free Numbers: 

Inside Ca.: (800) 352-2553 
Outside CA.: (800) 421-2533 



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4. All aluminum LNA mount and horn holder for accu- 
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5* Drake ESR-24 Receiver or Auto-Tech Rec6iver» 
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Power Supply (12V to 16V) 

Assembled & Tested S59.95 

Data Information (Plans) S9.d5 



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too 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



PLESSEY- AVANTEK 





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Af AmpHfit-- 3.05 SL162S Atil D01MCC Amp ft^ Q7 SLl6ao?(tj1 Maim Ckl 5.*5 
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Conventance engineered accessories 



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Have you tried it yet? 

ATV TRANSMITTER/CONVERTER 

MO Watts Output 
^Standard Frequencies Available 
* Broadcast Standard Sound 
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'Regulated AC Supply Built In 
TC— ^1 •Tuneable Oownconverter & Preamp 

Connect to the antenna terminals of any TV set. add a good 
450 MHz antenna^ a camera and there you are. . .Show the 
shack, home movies, computef games, video tapes, etc. 

ATV DOWNCONVERTER 

For thDS« w^ ivant tP $^ iHe ATV icUofi 
Defore they commil to a com pie le station, 
tne TVC'4 IS for you Great tor public ser- 
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interested. Just add an antenna and A TV 

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TERMS VISA Of MASTER CARD by tel«e*>one or mail, or tittck Qt riKHwy order by 
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P.C. ELECTRONICS 2522 P«x»Qn Lane, 



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Deatgned for reception of stereo broadcasts via 
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of all International and simiEarly equipped satellite 
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Signal PurHiar 



Bandpass f»ltar amplifier Boosts signal level up to 
+ 5 Db 10 Qvefcome Joss in long cable nirvs, 
Attenuat&s sjgnaf up to - TO Db to prevent overload 
on short cable runs ByiH-in DC block. 



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TO Nortfi Lam OWLMwrii C^ OK 73102 it40&l 236 3741 

For Biiditionai information please write direct 



K-See List ot Advertisers Ort pege fJ4 



73 Magazine • Ju!yJ982 101 



i^ 



MICROWAVE TELEVISION 
SUBSCRIPTION TELEVISION 

MICROWAVE TELEVISION 
EDUCATION MANUAL S16.2S 

Our updatecJ mamjal inclydes mpcrowavt QOn- 
cepts antennas and downcDnverters Includes 
deiaiietf sctiemabcs and P C bcia^d layouts 

SUBSCRIPTION TELEVISION 
EDUCATION MANUAL $14,95 

Two scrafTibling & decoding systems ate 
atplored m depth Signal capture and modifica 
lion tectinjques are presenied lor educaiioiuji 
analysis 

AMATEUR MICROWAVE 

RECEIVER SYSTEM $169.95 

Continutng in the high qualiiy and perlormance 
ihai you ve come to Know in the HMRII Ihi^ re- 
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INFORMATION PACKAGE ON ALL 

VIDEO PRODUCTS AND KITS $2.00 

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Frequency rAn|« 3J0 £Hl to 4.90 &Mi 
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Introductarjr offer: (30.00 Postpaid USA 
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For 2fi addttittnal charge «e will idipt thti fetrf 
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flGI 1U 96% shield; 75-ohm mil spec, ,.,.,,,. /2Wfl. 

RGBU 96% shield, mil sp&c $27J5/1 00 ft or 3lC/fL 

RG6A/U double shield, 75HDhm , .25«^fL 

RGBSAU stranded m IE fipec .. f2*/ft 

RG5@ mil sp^c. OeVi Bfiield 1 1 t/ft 

LOW LOSS FOAM DIELECTRIC 
RGax9&% shield ibiacK whtte or gray )..... SI 4,95/100 ft 



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RG8U 97% stijokl 1 1 ga. (equk Be{(S«fi 6214). . 

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100 ft RGftU with l>L 25S on eacti wid S1».»5 
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Grounding strip, heavy duly tubu^r brrftid 

Sne In. 1lnn«4i copper lO«/ti, 

3^fl In. tlnn*4 coppof ^ .*-...... 30cJH. 



OONNECTOflS MADE IM USA 

Am phenol PI-256-. 79t 

PL- 259 push- on adapter shell.,.., 10/S3.B9 

PL-259 & SO'239 „„.10/$5.e9 

Double Male Connector ,, **««,„ ^^.$1.79 

PL-25a Double FefnafeConnectof , .,.., 9flc 

1 f L patch cord w/ RC A t y pe pi ug & each end..,, ,3tt 1 .00 

Reducer UG-175 or 176 -..,*^„ *..„.. «..«..«*.J0/t1,9S 

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102 TSMagazine • July, 1982 



EARTH STATION OWNERS Gl DEALERS: 



You've got terrestrial interference 

We've got fiiters! 



■»»v. 



^IL 



for 



'^iicro 



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^«<i*f 



•ro/t 



iC^ovvavi riizEH coiTipjinv, inc. 



The concrete under your new earth station isn't hard yet. but 
youVe got trouble already — unwanted microwave signals are 
destroying your picture. Your customer is throwing tantrums, and 
you have two choices: Tear it down and eat the installation costs » 
or filter it. 

We can help Call us and well send you MTV/82, which tells 
how to eliminate terrestrial interference on earth stations and lists a 
complete line of filters designed and tested for this purpose. 
Created for effective use by novice and experienced earth station 
operators alike, MTV '8 2 explains each type of interference, 
describes the symptoms and recommends specific filters to solve 
your specific problems. 

• microwave & IF bandpass fitters 

• fF tr^s 
Products include: • waveguide adapters 

• power dividers 

• coax adapters 
m specials! 

Call or write today and we'll also send you FG/82, *Tarth Sta- 
tions & Terrestnaf fnterference: A Filtering Guide for the fnstatting 
Deafer. " 



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2 GHz IMcrawava Rscaivlig Systtim 

The new Micro-System features a machined 18" 
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regulated power supply and 50^ of 75ii coaxial down- 
lead, including a 3' jumper and matching transformer 
The Micro-System includes a full 6 month warranty. 

Micro-System (MS-021) , . . . .*159" 

Micro-System (MS-578) . . . , , , . ,'169" 

Micro-System (MS-645) .... * ^ .,,,.>,...,,..** . /179" 
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2 6Hi Dual Stage Microwave Preampirfiers 

Use the Ampire 2001 to improve the performance of your 
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fowers the system Noise Frgure and increases the overall 
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Ampire 1690N ,,'—.*••.•,•,,.. •.'ISS 
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GRAIN BtNS INDUSTRIAL ■ ELECTRtCAL - rHHlGATlON £aUIP. 



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Whether you need 1 system or 100 we have the 
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Write or call us for more informatiorr. 



^Se» List of Aii)itftiS9ts on p«g# ? M 



73 Magazine • July, 1982 103 



MEiy PRODUCTS 



STRAIGHT-KEY KEYER 

Designed exclusively for 
straight-key users, the Fist 
Fighter is an eiectronic keyer 
that accurately times the length 
of dotSj dashes, and the spaces 
between them. The Fist Fighter 
uses a standard 1;3:1 timing 
ratio and requires no new hand 
motions. An automatic tune-up 
feature Is built in so that normal 
key-down tune-up is possible, 
without the need for any extra 
switches. Speed Is variable from 
about 3 to 30 wpm. The Fist 
Fighter will key grid-block and 
solid-state transmitters/trans- 
ceivers. It is available in two 
forms: kits cost $59.95 and an 
assembled version sells for 
$79.95. Additional information 
and specifications are available 
from The Bhcksburg Group, 



Box 242, Biacksburg VA 24060. 
Reader Service number 482- 

PHONE INTERCONNECT 

The CES IVIodel 560 intefcon- 
nect is designed to interconnect 
a base station or control station 
to a telephone line. The 560 is a 
sampling type of interconnect, 
using no VOX circuits for con- 
trol. The IVIadel 560 is one way 
that repeaters located away 
from phone lines can have auto- 
patch capability. When the inter- 
connect is in use, the control 
station wlii transmit for one sec* 
ond and then sample the re- 
ceiver for ten to twenty-five milli- 
seconds to determine if a sta- 
tion Is transmitting, if a signal Is 
found, the control station will 
stay on receive until it stops; if 
no signal Is present, the control 




l:^^^ 



The Fist Fighter. 





CO Products' operating desk. 



CES's Model 560 phone interconnect. 
104 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



station will transmit for another 
second. 

Toll-restrict and dial-out 
capability can be enabled by 
f ront-panei switches. The Model 
560 does not affect the use of 
the control station for normal 
communication. It Is priced at 
S990. For more information, con' 
tact Communications Elec- 
tronics Specialties, Inc., PO Box 
507, Winter Parf( FL 32790. 
Reader Service number 478. 

SHACK FURNITURE 

CQ Products announces the 
Introduction of an operator's 
desk designed like an organ 
console to place aJI the oper- 
ator's equipment within easy 
view and reach. The desk sur- 
face and shelves are con- 
structed of 200-pound indus- 
trial-grade chipboard and are 
covered with formica. The two 
shelves are adjustable in height 
to accommodate viftually any 
ham or computer gear. 

The desk is designed to fit in- 
to the corner of your ham shack 
and is also attractive enough to 
be placed in your living room or 
den. The desk occupies 60 inch- 
es from the room corner to each 
edge, it is priced at $495. For 
more information, contact CQ 
Products, 8280 Janes Avenue, 
Suite 137-1700, Woodridge IL 
60517. Reader Service number 
476. 

MiCRO SOLDERING STATION 

TheWahl Clipper I so-Tip 7470 
micro soldering station elim- 
inates continuous switching to 
maintain temperature and, 
therefore, the spikes that can 
damage delicate electrical com- 
ponents. The totally grounded 
unit can be adjusted for any 
temperature between 500 and 



700 degrees F. With the selec- 
tion of the proper tip, heat is 
delivered only to those points 
where it is needed. The temper- 
ature-adjustable soldarlng sta- 
tion comes complete with 
sponge holder, tip-wiping 
sponge, soldering iron, and 
stand. The suggested price is 
$47.75. For further information, 
contact Wahi Clipper Corp., PO 
Box 578, Sterling IL 61081. 
Reader Service number 479. 

VHP KITS 

The R76 VHF FM receiver kit 
is an improved version of the 
R75 receiver for 10m, 6m, 2m, 
220 MHz, or the adjacent com- 
mercial bands, ft features a very 
low-noise front end, pump-resis- 
tant squelch with hysteresis to 
lock onto fading signals, on- 
board volume and squelch con- 
trols for easy wiring, and fixed i-f 
falters for easy alignment. It is 
available In two selectivity op- 
tions, starting at $84,95, 

A new UHF receiver kit has 
also been introduced. The 




Wahi' a iso-Tip 7470 micro 
soldering station. 



WIRE AND CABLE 

RQ-213 27tm 

RG-aU foam, 96*/o bratd ................. .23.5*/ft 

RG-BX foam, 95% braid 1 1.5*/ft 

RG-59 mi I sp&c 1 1 .5«/ft 

RG-tlU i9«m 

450otim ladder line, 100 flrott,, *. .;, ..S1075 

S conductof rotor cable 15«/ft 

14 Ga. Stranded Copper _(50ft. mult.)S«m 

12 Ga. Solid Copperweid. .. . . .(50 ft. muit,)&«m 

14 Ga, Solid Copperweld. . . , . . (50 ft. mult.)6«/ft 

8 Ga Solid Aluminum, (50 ft. mult) 6«m 

ANTENNA ACCESSORIES 

Ceramic Dopbone Inauiators 65(/ea 

Amphenoi Silver Piate PL-259 75«/ea 

W2AU Balun 1:1 or4:1 $1^25 

VANGORDEN 1:1 Balun. . , . ./.;.,.., .,/ $850 

VAN GORDEN 1:1 Center insul $5.50 

B&W Traps 80M0m thru I0m $25.65/pf 

8&W 376 or 376 Coax Switch ...,..,,. .$19 25 

9&W 593 Coax Switch. .$17,35 

B&W 595 Coax Switch $22,50 

ROTORS 

CDE AR'22....,..ii... _,,,,.,.,.. $51.45 

CDE CD-45 . , $92,55 

CDE HAM 4 $170.30 

CDE TAIL TWtSTEH. , . , . , $238-25 

ANTENNAS 

Mm PRODUCTS Mlht Quad. . . ..,.w. ^ - ^ - ,$127,96 

MINt PRODUCTS C-4 Vert .$55.00 

BUTTERNUT HF6V . ,...., , .$1 10.00 

BUTTERNUT 2MCV . , .$45.00 

HY-GAtN . , .Call orwrite for 

HUSTLER _._.,. .big discount price 

SHURE 444D DUAL IMP. MIC i ; Vv$45.95 

BENCHER PADDLES, biaCk^chrome. .$35.00/$42.75 

LARSON LM 150-MM $35.00 

VOCOM 5/B 2 MTR HI ANT ...,....., ... $15,95 

VOCOM 2 iN 25^0UT 2 MTR AMP. $69.75 

VOCOM2iN50OUT2MTBAMP $103.95 

POCKET POWER. . . , $175.55 



SHIPPfNG CHARGES ADDiTIONAL, PA RESi- 
DENTS INCLUDE 6% SALES TAX MC/ViSA, PRE- 
PAY BY CERT. CHECK OR MO AND TAKE A 2% 
DISCOUNT OFF THE ABOVE PRICES, PRICES 
SUBJECT TO CHANGE. 

HEA$€ SENO FOR FLYER 

LACUE COMMUNICATIONS, 
ELECTRONICS 

102 Village St. • Johnstown, PA 15902 

iei4j 530-5500 

HOURS MWTh 10 till 6 • Tu & F 10 till 9 

Sat I0tiil4 



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TOLL 800-221-0860 free 


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rOP BRAND Popular Receiving Tub« Types 

FACTORV BOXED 75/80% OFF LIST 

FREE LIST Available 

i^ncludes full Sine of RF Power Transisiors. 

Minimurn Order $25 

Allow $3.00 Minimum for UPS Ciiarges 

Write or phone for free catalog. 
TUBES— BOUGHT, SOLD AND TRADED 



Premium Prices 

Paid 

For EIMAC Tubes 



COMMUNICATIONS, Inc. 
2115 Avenue X 
Brooklyn, NY 11235 
Phone (212) 646-6300 . ■'^^ 



tfSee List of Adverffsms on page 1 14 




$54.96 



KD-44 



TM 




Parabolic R^fkeclor K»l 
900MH£-2.^GH£ 




A iow cost, hi^gli quality 
all^rnative to stiOw sieds 

and yagjs. 44" diameter, 2 
piece dyrab^e lighrweight 
steel const. Includes feed- 
horti bFackei. pre -cut hard- 
ware cloth and afl harctware 
needed for assembly. 
Excellent for weather s^teJ- 
frte and 1296 MHz e.Jiperi- 
rrientersl 



Ouf hit bIao comai In 
t 2 #t. lizfl with 19 db 
gain- ONLY *24.50 



2300 MHZ CONVERTER KIT ........36.00 

Includes PC board, pans A instruction manual. 

SELECTIVE P REAM P.. (33J5 

For use with above convefter, ThhS preamp can aPso be used 
with other manufacturer's boards tor improved pertormance. 

V ARI A BL E POWER Sti PPL Y $34.35 

Includes all components, case, oveffays, tjuill in anienr>a 
switch. 

DEH/XE23M MHZ CONVERTER KIT ...S99J5 

Recommended for experienced Ktt builders. Dual^slste selec- 
tive p re-amp, mixer, i.f. amplilier and np-drii^t ciysral-con- 
Tro-lled oscillator. 

12V STATIONARY POWER SUPPLY*,^^™^.*K.v*4«t..M*,...,S24-95 

For use wi^th Deluxe Converter. 

MODEL TMVS-lKrr $39.95 A $sem bled iSAM 

For use between two VCR's 

MODEL TMVS 1RFKIT. . . 559.95 AssembJed S79.W 

(Built in RF Modulatoir for direct conriiection froni VCR to TV) 




TEXAS MICROTRONICS 



P.O. BOX 1411« 
ARLINGTON. TEXAS 78013 



^^328 



TERMS: 

Visa, MasterCard 

Checlk, Money order, 
and CO D. I Add $2i 



I 






mp i ^-^ 'i^^^ 




::|i^iipii;i(iii^:iHe: :ii^l^ii^i4l':-witi:ilt]« ^lilteif ace 



tm: 



.■.".f 



transnii^iii tt^a riicessary AFSK wies for rtty^ 
liSCil , a rtd Rff f eW'Jdv The mail u$i ineliiiies a comp lete 

If M^H morsi software 11 also ivai lib (e is j iskette lot 
^iiiili and cartrid^eior Atari^ ■■^:^':j.:i"--A^^^^^^^^^ 
lllHow the leadii^ kantrdhieslrttd the ciiii^^ 
lpimatiwr-iradioi^'^^eThe,,ifit*rfae€*|^::^ 
eti Kan t roiiics'rdiailef ,:- Wrt^ntact I '-M- 




Lawrence, Kansas 66044 



73 Magazine • July, 1982 105 




J 



W fiM 



> 



— 4 



• "-1 i»t:^ 




Hamtfonics' BhuftlB receiver. 







Paiommr Engineers ' PT-407 antenna tuner. 



TMAC Products* S^D.-500 weather station. 
106 73 Magazine • July.t982 



model R451 includes the fea- 

tures listed above plus auto- 
matic frequency control to lock 
onto drifting iransmlt signals. 
Kits are available with various 
options starling at $94.95, 

Hamtronics has a new line of 
low-noise ampilfiers. In ap- 
pearanca, they resemtjie Ham- 
tronics* earlier P30 and P432 
receiver preamplifiefs. but the 
circuit is nevw. They are opti- 
mized for lowest noise figure in 
the ham bands but can also be 
used on adjacent commercial 
bands. Noise figures typically 
run 0.5 dB at 28 and 60 MHz, 0.6 
dB at 144 MHz. OJ dB at 220 
MHz. and 0.95 dB at 432 MHz. 
Gain runs from 33 dS al 28 and 
50 MHz to 17 dB at 432 MHzThe 
price Is $39.95 for the VHP units 
and $44.95 for the UHF unit, all 

wired and tested. 

The Hamtronics R1 10-450 
UH F AM aircraft receiver may be 
used to listen to the Space Shut* 
tie. Good results have been 
reported using simple UHF 
antennas. The special Shuttle 
receiver kit is available off the 
shelf for $94.95. 

For further information on 
these producis, write to Ham- 
tronics, Inc., 65- V Mout Road, 
Hifton NY 14468; {716^392-9430. 
Reader Service number 480. 

WEATHER STATION 

TMAC Products is intro- 
ducing the S.D.-500 weather sta- 
tion. This system provides wind 
velocity indications from 0*100 
mph and wind direction read- 
ings covering 16 compass 
points* The console is con- 
structed of hand-finished ma- 
hogany and the transmitter can 
be up to 300 feet away from the 
console and a 50-foot cable is 
supplied. The unit is powered by 
155 volts ac. The list price is 



S360. For more infomnation. con- 
tact TMAC Products, PO Box 
28341, Columbus OH 43228. 
Reader Service number 483. 



ANTENNA TUNER 

The Palomar Engineers 
PT*407 is a generai'purpose 
tuner for 1.8*30 MHz to niatch 
antennas fed with coaxial or 
open-wire iines, single-wire or 
mobile antennas. The 300-Watt 
power rating makes \X just right 
for most transceivers. The 
PT-407 is an efficient tuner with 
3 large alrwound coil, a large 
balun for open-wire feed, and 
ceramic insulation throughout. 
It is housed in an e"x4"x7*' 
aluminum cabinet. All controls 
are on the front panel, coaxial 
connectors are SO-239, and por- 
celain insulators are used for 
balanced lines and single-wire in- 
puts* The PT-407 antenna 
tuner sells for $149.95, For more 
information, write to Palomar 
Engineers, 1924-F W. Mission 
Road, Escondido CA 92025. 



SATELLITE STATION 

The Ten-Tec Model 2510 con- 
tains a 435-MHz USB/CW trans^ 
mitter and a high dynamic range 
2-meter-to-1 0-meter receive con- 
verter. The Model 2510 and a 
10-meler SSB/CW receiver pro- 
vide full duplex, transmit, and 
receive functions for operating 
on the upcoming OSCAR Phase 
3 satellite in Mode B, 

The transmitter operates 
from 435 to 435.5 MHz (coverage 
can be extended to 437 MHz 
with an optional oscillator). Ten 
Watts out is available m USB 
and CW, The receive portion 
converts 144*146 MHz to 28-30 
MHz. A 12-volt power supply is 
required. Amateur net price for 



*liMnc^ iiki 



rsQffSE inuMOf RSCll CQN-iE^fE9 J^ 



lilt 

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Yaesu's FT-290H transceiver. 



I 



the Model 2510 is $489, For 
more information, contact Ten- 
Tec, Seviervilte TN 37862, 



READER/CONVERTER 

The Advanced Eiectfonics Ap- 
pMcations MBA-RC (Morse, 
Baydot, ASCII Reader/Code 
Converter) Is actually several 
sophisticated devices ali 
wrapped up in one package. Ttie 
unit performs as a f ull*f unction 
decoder and display unit for 
Morse-, Baudot-, and ASCJI- 



coded signals, operating direct- 
ly from the audio output of any 
stable communications recelv- 
er. The MBA-RC also encom- 
passes a Morse, Baudot, and 
ASCfl encoder and code con- 
verter. The unit will perform 
serial-to-parallel and paraiiel'to- 
serial code conversions as well 
as cross-mode conversions. All 
the necessary analog process- 
ing and tone generation for two- 
way contacts in any MBA codes 
Is tncluded. 
Other features include a built- 



in sfdetone monitor, an FSK 
tone generator and an auto- 
matic station ID message. The 
MBA-RC has a list price of 
$469.95. For more information, 
contact Advanced Efectrontc 
Apptications, PO Box 2160, Lyn~ 
v^ood WA 98036. Reader Service 
number 477. 



PORTABLE TRANSCEIVERS 

The FT-290R and FT-690R are 
multi-mode battery portable 
transceivers for 2 meters and 6 



meters, respectively. Designed 
for 2.5 Watts output on SSB, 
CW; and FM (the FT-690R also 
has AM), these transceivers use 
liquid crystal displays and in^ 
elude scanning in variable 
steps. The FT-290R and FT'690R 
are powered by alkaline or nicad 
CH:ells (not supplied). The FT- 
290R is priced at S399 and the 
FT-690R is offered for $379. For 
more information, contact 
Yaesu Elect ronics Corp., PO 
Box 49, Paramount CA 90723. 
Reader Service number 481* 




Salting 73 Mag- 
azine will make 
money for you. Consid- 
er the facts: 
Fact #1: Selling 73 Magazine 
increases store traffic — our deafers 
telt us that 73 Magazine is the hot- 
test-selling amateur radio magazine on the 
newsstands. 

Fact #2: There is a direct correlation between 
store traffic and sales— increase the number of people 
coming through your door and you'll increase sales. 
Fact #3: Fact #1 + Fact #2 = INCREASED SALES, 
which means more money for you. And that's a fact. 

For information on selling 73 Magazine, call 
800-343-0728 and speak with Ginnie Boudrieau, our 
bulk sales manager. Or write to her at 73 Magazine, 

80 Pine St., Peterborough, NH 03458. 




MAGAZIHE 

QQ Pine Street Pet^rbQrouqK HH 03458 

800-3430728 




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73 Magazine • July J 982 107 



Wayne Green Books 




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Uso the offttef card of iiemlze your or6m on ^ separate piec« of popef and mail to Wayne Green Books All: Sal&s • Petefl^ofougti NH Qi^ASd. 
Be Siire lo incfude check, or detailed ct&dil card infortTLatiQti. (Vi&a, Master Charge or American Express accepfecf | 

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HtftSe allow i-6 wesks after publicaiiorv tor deUvefy. Questions regafdJn^ yo*ir order? Please write 10 Customer Service at tfie above 



lOa 73 Magazine • July, 1982 





the 












10 

11 



NEVER SAY DIE — If you want controversy, 
Wayne Green W2NSD/1 will give it to you. His 
popular column ranges from travelogue to tirade 
and is guaranteed to entertain, inspire and 
enlighten you. 

DX— This globe-trotting column keeps you in- 
formed about the news of the DX world from King- 
man Reef to Bahrain. 

CONTESTS— You get all the news on the contest 
world from Robert Baker WB2GFE. He'll give you 
information on upcoming events and results from 
recent contests. 

FUN — Just for fun, )ohn Edwards KI2U provides 
you with wacky puzzles, quizzes, and games that 
test your ham mettle, 

FCC — If you're looking to the future, these out- 
takes from the Federal Register chronicle changes 
in policy and regulations that relate to amateur 
radio. 

RTTY LOOP— To keep you abreast of radiotele- 
type developments, Marc Leavey WA3A)R ex- 
plains the new RTTY equipment, the increasing 
role of computers in RTTY, and other matters of 
interest to digital communications fans. 

REVIEWS — Before you buy, save yourself some 
money . check 73's in-depth evaluation of the 
latest gear. 

HAM HELP— As a service to you, 73 prints your 
questions in our magazine. This helps you to ob- 
tain hard-to-get parts, schematics, and owner's 
manuals. 

SATELLITES- From Phase III to TVRO, 73 Maga- 
zine covers the news of the satellite world like no 
other radio amateur magazine. 

NEW PRODUCTS— Thts brief look at the latest 
ham equipment on the market keeps you on top of 
new developments rn amateur radio 

AWARDS — To find out what certificates are avail- 
able where, read Bill Cosney KEZC's coverage of 
all the ham radio awards. 

CONSTRUCTION -The builder's magazine... 
that's 75, You get the best projects from the best 
authors every month. 




I Send me a dozen issues of ] 

for the dozen reasons listed! | 



I 



Send m 

7$ 



D 1 year, USA SI 9,97 

D 1 year, CANADA. US funds $22 97 
I ni year. Foreign Surface, $39.97. drawn on U.S banks only, 
* D MC D VISA D AM. EXP D CHECK/MO 



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Subscription Departnient 
P,0, Box 931 
Farmtngdale, NY 11737 

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mrjAmi 






*.;^^- 







From 




MAGAZIHE 






THE 1982 EDITION 

GENERAL LICENSE 
STUDY GUIDE 

by Timothy M. Oanief N8RK 



This \s the complete guide to the General License. 
Leamfng rather than memorizing is the secret. This 
is not a question^and-answer guide thai will gather 
dust when the FCC issues a new test. Instead, this 
book will be a helpful reference, useful long after a 
ham upgrades to General. Includes up-to-date FCC 
rules and an application form. 
ORDER yours today and talk to the world, 
SG7358 $6.95 

Please call regarding availability 

'Use itie DTctercard on itie t\&^m Stivice page of tHis magaztneor 
Itemize youj orctef on a sepaf ate 0ec« ai pa^er ami niaii td: 73 Radio 
BooHshop*Petefborougti NH 03458 Be sure to include ctiech or 
delai^ed credit card intofinaiion No C O.O. orders accepioil. A^ 
St SO ttandHrvg ctiarge for the lirsf tK>ok, Si 00 tot each addilionaF 
booh. Questions regard^nf; your Of der'^ PJease wnte to Cuslomer 
Service at the abov^ address Please alio* 4-^ ipireelts fof deft very, 

¥DU TOLL FREE ORDERING 
CALL 1 800-258-5473 



From 

THE 




^MAGAZIHE 




MOST 

UP-TO-DATE 

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ATLAS 
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• WORLD REPEATER ATLAS— BK7315-Coinp)cte]y 
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IN STOCK AND READY TO SHIP 

'Use ifie order cMtti on fi^e deader Service p»ge o1 Ihis majjaiine 

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The Electronic 
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Computer Aidrd Design (CAD) is one of the newest 
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THE ELECTRONIC BREADBOARD permits the 
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110 73 Magazine • July. 1982 



RADIO 




r. 



FOR THE NOVICE 

New, updated editions 

of our famous novice 

license study guide and novice study tapes 



4Jt 



f07-JiT 



h9 

NOVICE 

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STIJOY 



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if- 



i Hilt 



• PiOVlCE STUDY GUIDE— by TirmTthy M. Oani«; NQI^K H«f« is me mosi up fa Ctflte mivtce gu«l« 
avAiidbJe It Is compLete wilti tnfor mat ton about learning Morse Coae. has It^ Fates! FCC amatautr«{Md- 
t«OfiS tnd ttie cyrf^nt FGC a43phcjit>aHn tonn^L This guiJe t% fiQl a guest loni'an^Mrer memorizaiKin coorse 
bui rath«r iT empliasizes the ptacrical skfe ot oslttno 3 ham license and putt^n^ « staiion on the air H 
reflects what the FGC exp«eta A Kovice to know vvlttioijl j;>aa« after page ot dull th^ry The mo^ cunf&nl 
info/maiic^ shii ayaiiat>te aT ia$i year s ofice. SG7357 S4 95/ 

• NOVICE ^TUDY TAPES— K you are jusl getting started in ham radio^ you'll (ind these tap^ indisperi^ 
salnfiQl This Lip^]:o-1ih&mmii1& wvinmn Of the 73 Study Course Is ttie perfect way to learn ^varythlng you 
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Thauaands of peopte have discovered how easy learning frorn cassette can be— order now and enter 
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SctentiBis have proven I hat you learn taster by listening than by readmg because you can play a cas- 
selte tape over and ovsf in your ftpare time — even while you're driving' You get more and more mfa 
each ttmeyou hear il, You can'l progress wiihout solid fundameniats- These (hree hour-long rapes give 
you ail the basics ypull need Id pas& the Novice eKam ea^^ly You'lf ?<rave an yndefstarromg ot ihe ba- 
sics which Willi be mvaJuabie to you fof me tes.t ol your iife> Can you afford to lake you( Novice exam 
wilticiit first Hsteriing 10 the'se tapes? 

Special Offer! Both Novice License Study Guide 
and Novice Study Tapes $19.95 Order NP7300. 

GENERAL LICENSE STUDY GUIDE 



NEW 

NEW 
NEW 

NEW 



GENERAL LICENSE STUDY GUIDE-by Timolhy M. 
Daniel NflflK ThJS ts the complete guide to Ihe General 
License Learning rather than memorizing is the 
secret, Th(3 is not a question and answer guide that 
will gather dusi when the FCC issues a new test- In- 
stead, tn ts booK wiM be a helpful reference, ysetui long 
after a ham upgrades to General fncEudes up to-date 
FCC rules af\d an application fcwm. Otder yours today 
and talk to the world SG7358 S6.9& 




Style W 



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W2NSD/1 



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dehvery 



• U9f%ARY SHELF BOXES— These sturdy white, cof- 
rugaied. dirt resistant boxes each fKjId a f u1 1 year oi 73. 
Kf'obat/d Mtcfocoirtpuftng Of 80 kticfocomputrng. WttT? 
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following; 71 Ktiottaua Mrcroccfnputing. $OMiCfocQm 
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• Preserve and protect your coiiectiOfi for a iHetimt' 
Ofder these handsome red binder^ wilh gold lettering 
$7 50 for 1, 3 tof S21 75, S for $42.00 (Postpaid wilhtn 
USA, please add S2 50 per ordet outside USA.) Cfieck or 
money ortfefs o^/y, ^o o^o^e or C.O.D. on^fS 7Z 
Blrtd*r3. P,0. Box 51 20. Phil«4eipht«. PA 1914t, 

'NOTt^— AbpTc ttddrcu fen- Blxtdcrt Milf. 



73 Code Tapes 

any four tapes for 
$15.95! $4.95 each 



5 WPM — CT7305— This is the beginning tape foe people 
who do not know the code at All II takes the<fi through 
the 26 lettef^, lO nurribers and necessary punctuation, 
compEete with practtce evefy step of the Mray ii$'ng the 
newest blit; teaching lechntques. ft is alrriost mirac- 
ulous! In one fiour rr^tny people — irfctudino k+ds ot ten — 
are abte to master the code. The ease of learning gi'ves 
Oo>nfHleTu:e to begmr^e^s who might otf^efwise CtoQ out. 



*^HE STICKLER" 

S+ WPW— CT7306"-Thi5 ss the practice tape tor tt>e 
Novice and Technician licenses, Jt is made up ot one 
so^Kl hour of code. $eht «l the of f fciai FCC standard (rx> 
other tape we've heard uses these standards, sa many 
people Ronh the code wt>en they are suddenly— yndoc 
pressure^ — faced with cfiaracters sent ai 13 wpin and 
spaced tor 5 wpm} This tape is not memor Liable, gnlike 
the zany 5 wpm tape, since the code groups are entirely 
random characters sent tn groups of five. 



^BACK BREAKER" 

t3+ WPM— CT7313— Code groups again, at a brisit 14 
per so you wiM twat ease when you s^t down in Irontol the 
seeely-eyed govemmenl inspector and he starts sending 
you pi am langyage at only 13 per You need this eittra 
margin to overcorre the panic which ts unjvers^i ir ttie 
test situattons. When you Ve speni your money a no hme 
to take the test, you it tt^anK f^eaven you had thts back 
breakmg tape 



-COURAGEOUS" 

20+ WPM— CT7320^ Code is *t\ai gets you wtwn you 
go (or the Extra cl%»s license tt ts so embarrassing to 
panic Oiit just because yo<j didn't prepare yours#l1 with 
this tape Though this is oniy one word fastet , Ihe coc^e 
groups are so difficult that ycrtjil almost fail asleep copy- 
ir*g the FCC stuff by comparison. Users rejK>rt tt%at lh»ey 
can t tielieve how easy 20 per really is with this fantastic 
one hour tape 



"OUTRAGEOUS" 
25 + WPM— CT7325— This is the tape for I hat small 
group of cverachievlna hams who wouldn'l be conteni to 
simpJy satisfy Ihe code reduiremenis of the Esilra Class 
license lis the toughesi tape we've got ar>d we keep a 
permanent file ol hams who have mastered il Lei us 
Know wrien you're up to speed and we'll Inscribe your 
name in 73's CW ' HaM of Fame/ 



SSTV TAPE 

• Stow SCAN TELEVISION TAPE— CT7350-PrT3?fr 
lArmnir^ programs Uom tr* 73 SSTV contest. EKcellsni 
tor Demo! $5 95 " 



^ 



• BACK ISSUES — Complete your collection: many are 
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733(X16 73 BACK ISSUE— BEFORE JULY 1960 

.,...,., $ 3,00 

73 BACK ISSUE JULY 1900 THRU OCT. 1381 

. .. . ........ ^r-'^V 

73 BACK ISSUE NOV iSfil TO PRESENT 
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i*-iiB'fai'viiii»4-»»+-w'i"f'll »+ + «+ »i ■ P IT! ■ "i J-i > ■ r T i - , t ■ n a i ■ a"^ ? U ■ f *J 

73 BACK ISSUE- 10 YOUR CHOICE 

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73 BACK ISSUE— 25 YOUft CHOK^E 

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HAND BOOKS FOR 
THE HAMSHACK 



THE COMPLETE SHORTWAVE LISTENER'S HAND- 
iOOK, 2nd EDITION by Hank O^nnett and Harry L 
Helms. This compraTienftjvo volume contains loads o1 
new Irvformatior frorrt &U over ihe world on Ihe lateal 
developments ^n SWL iftchr^ology ctybs. assoclalions, 
praci tees and stations, A ihoroughgu^detosiailonaot 
th« wpf Id by general c:ont4nen1al area and frequency le 
Included. BK1241S9.95 

THE TEN METER FM HANDflOOK-t^ Bob H«ll KSBD 
T?iii liAndbooK has teen published ro twi^ Vtm ten m«f(»r 
•nilw«i«sf fsam mora atx>ui ir>e miny matlKMis of con- 
veriions aiK} tricks that are usod to make ent^ting ghltft 
worl( belief, ioln the great "tlnMrefs" of the wodd on ten 
FM and en^oy the fantastic amoynl ot ty.n in cofnrriunk- 
Caltng «ith amateyr siatiorn wiorldwkle on ten meter 
PM BKi 190 U^ ' 

THE PRACTICAL HANDBOOK OF AMATEUfi RADIO FM 

REPEATERS— by Bill Pasternak WA€ITF tauihor of 73 
MaQa;ine5 monthly column "Looking Westl This is the 
booh for the VHFiUHF FMer, comptled from materiil 
submitted by ovm a hundred mdjvfdual?, dubft, 
organizations and equipment maoufacturers- A "must 
have" for your bam shack shail. BK1185 S12.95/ 





TH E 73 TEST 
EQUIPMENT LIBRARY 



VOL It AUDIO FREQUENCY TESTERS-Jam-packed 
with all hind^s ot audto frequency lest equlpmanl. If 
yoy're mto SSB, RTTY. SSTV. etc. this book Js a musi tor 
you. a good tiooh tor hi-ti addicts^ and ^^perimantdrs, 
tool LB7360I4 96* 

VOL m RADIO FREQUENCY TESTERS— Radio iTequen- 
Cf waves, itie common dtenominatDr ot ajnaieur fBdki. 
Such items as SWR. antenna lmpedai>ce. ltn& impede 
aJK«. RF output, and field strwigm; detail^ instmctioris 
CHI testing Umm items IncJudes sections on signal gsn- 
efators. crystil catibratofv* find flip oscillator«, nottft 
generators, dummy loads, and much mor*. 
LfiT^ei S4.95.- 

VOL. IV to TEST EOUlPWENT-BecOfne a Imubfe^ 
Khqoting wFzardi In this foyriri volume of the 73 TEST 
EQUIPMENT LIBRARY are 42 home conitruciion proh 
eels for buildlrvg lest eciuipmem to work with your ham 
station and In Servicing digiiial equipment. Plug a 
cumylaiive index for all Tour volumes *or Ihe /hJT£ST 
EQUIPMENT LIBRARY. LB7362 $4.95. " 

RF AND DIOITAL TEST EQUIPMENT YOU CAN 
eUlLO— QK1044 — iRf burst, function, square wave gan- 
a rat ore, variable lenQth pulaa ganaratora— 100 kH;^ 
marker. M and H sweep generators, audio osc, af^rf aig- 
nal mjector; 146 MHz synthesizer digitai readouts for 
counters, several countefs, pre scaler, microwave 
meter, etc 25Z pages ^ flK1.0d4 S5.95/ 




FOR 
THE 



aWTEST 
COOKBOOK 



\< 



'ii 



CONTESTERii 




THE CONTEST COOKBOOK— This book revels the 
secrets o1 that elite group of operators who top the list 
when the contest results are published. It contains 
detailed suggestions for the first time contestet as weil 
33 tips for the advanced operator Domestic, OX, and 
specialty contests are all discussed, complete with 
photographs and diagrams showing the equipment and 
operating aids used by the lop scorers. For the serious 
r;ont ester. BK73a& $5.95, 



Tools ;ai 

Techniqoes 



FOR El-ECTROfliCS 




THE 73 TECHNICAL LIBRARY <^' 



I 



THE COHPL&TC 

SHORTWAVE 
LISTENER'S 

HANDBOOK-: 



INTERFERENCE 

HA 



I :(«:• 



TOOLS & TECHNIQUES FOR ELECTRONICS^ by A A 

Wicks is an easyto-undersianc oook wfitlern for the 
b&gtnning ktt-tHjilder as *eH as tt>e exp^nervqed hob- 
byist. It has ngmefous pictures and descriptions of tfie 
safe arKi cc^rect ways to yse basic arvd specFahfed tools 
tor e^edforiic projects, as w«ti as speciahzaci meltl* 
working lools arvd tn« criemic^ ^ds which afs tiiad In 
repair shops. BK7348 14 9S ' 

BEHIND THE DIAL— Thfs book ex^l^ins, tn detail, 
what's going on on at i the freiiuencie^, from shortwave 
up to micrDwave It gives (he reader a good idea of what 
he can Und mnd whete to find it. inciuding some ot the 
secret stations sych as the CJ.A. and the FBI. 
Everyitiing is: covered short of microwave monitoring. 
Anyone interesied in purchasing a shortwave receiver 
st^ouid tiave a copy of I his book, surveillance, station 
layout consideration, antenna systems, Interlace, and 
liie electromagnetic spectrum, are ingluded. 
BK7307 $4.95 

THE NEW WEATHER SATELLITE HANDBOOK-by Or. 
Ralph E. Taggarl WBBDQT. Here is the completely up- 
dated and revised editiort containing al] tt^e informa- 
tion on t?ie most sophisticated and effective space- 
craft now in ortJii. This book serves both ihe eKperii^ 
enced amateur satellite enthusiast and the newcomer 
It IS an iniroduction tosaleltite watching, providing alt 
the inlormatton re<)yired to construci a complete and 
highly effective ground station. Solid hardware 
designs and all the instructions necessary to operaie 
the equipment are mduiSed, For expenmentera who 
are operating stations the booh details alt procedures 
necessary to modify equipment for the new ienas of 
spacecraft Amateui weather satetHie activity repre- 
sents a uniQye blend of interests encompassing elec^ 
trontcs. meteorology amj astronautics Jo+n the privi* 
leged lew in watch iriQ Ihe spectacle of earth as seen 
ifrom space on your own monitoring equipmenf. 
BK73a3 S8 95 * 





tn>«aHl i^m Ij LM^ r* 



THE CHALLENGE OF tflO— The ofowth of »mateur radio 
today is encourdging tlie use of 160 meiers. Ail the mfof- 
cTialion neoessary to get started on ttiis unique band, the 
all-important antenna and grourul systems are de^rtbed 
tn detail. Also, how lo gel on, top"t»and operating tips, 
top-band Iransmltlees, propagation, wealhef receivirrg 
equipment, and more are covered in fyll The introduc- 
tion contains interesting pliotos of Stew Perry's (the 
King of 160) shack. This reference is useful to new and 
experienced top-band operators. SK7309 £4.95 

INTERFERENCE HANDBOOK— by William R. Nelson, 
WA6EQG — Tt>l9 timely handbook covers every type of 
RFL problem and gives you the sol ul ions based on 
practical experience. Covers interference lo TV. radio, 
hi-fi, telephone, radio amateur, commercial and CB 
equipment Power line interference is covered in depth 
— flow to locate it, cure it. work wiin the public, safety 
precautions, how to train RFfl investigators Written by 
an HFl en pen with 33 years of ex pen en ce, this profuse- 
ly illustrated book is packed with practical easy-to- 
understand information. BK1230 $S 95 * 

OWNER REPAIR OF RADIO EQUlPMENT-t>y Frank 
Gtass K6flO, Hera's a book t^at wtil teach you an ap- 
proach to Iroutjiieshoofing wittiout a shack fuH o1 test 
equipment Written <n a narrative, nor^-matriematical 
style. It wtti encOiirage' yo-u to successfuliy fik your own 
rig protiEems 60 to 90% of Itie time. Ewen i1 you donl 
want to fix. you can learti a lot about how things worft 
and fdM. Add to your library and personal expertise. 
BK7310S7 95.' 



WORLD PRESS SERVICE FREQUENCIES-by 
Thomas Harrington Can t wait to hear the evenmg 
news, or are you wondering alDoul the news that you 
af&n't hearing? Recsfve by Radio Teletype (RTTY) git 
the world news and fjfiancial happenings from the 
world cap^iols on a 24 hour a elay twtls. This booh gives 
yo4j Itie Irequencies ar>d times of tKoadcast of such 
news servkces as AP, tlPI, Reuters, TASS. VOA and 
London Press. Also included Is an mtroduofron to 
BTTY with information on eoui^pment, antennas, atxbre- 
via I ions— everything you need to get slarted in RTTY. 
SKi202$7»' 

SSB . THE MISUNDERSTOOD MOCli— by James B. 
Wilson. Single Sideband Transmission . . thousands of 
us use It every day, yet it remains one ol the feast 
understood facets ot amateur radio. J. B Wilson 
presents several methods of sideband generation, am- 
ply lllysiratad with charts and schemailcs, which will 
enable the ambitious reader to construci his own side- 
band generaior A musi for the lechnically-serlous ham. 
BK7351 S5 50 ■ 

PROPAQATtOll WIZARD'S HANDBOOK- by J. K 
Netson. When sunspots riddJed the worldwide com- 
mufij cat ions networks of the 1940s, John Henry Nelson 
toohed 10 the planeis for an answer The result was a 
theoiry of propagation forecasting based upon ifiter- 
planetary alignment that made the Autttor tfie most re- 
Battle torecastef m America to<)ay The book provides an 
enlighrened look at communications pa^st, present, and 
future, as weir as teaching iht art of propagatkin 
forecasiing. BK7302 16JGl' 

IC OP AMP COOK BOOK -bv Walter G Jun^. Covers 
not only the t>asic trteory of the IC op amp in great 
detaii. but a lira includes over 350 practical circurt ap^ 
plications, litwrally illustrated. 592 pages, 5%x3Vf, 
sottbound. BKl02ai14.9S.' 



*Use the order card in this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail tor 73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 05458. Be sure to include check or 
detailed credit card information. No COO. orders accepted. All orders add St.GO handling. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. Questions regarding your order? Please write to 
Customer Service a| ttve above address. {Prices Subject to change on bocks not published by 73 f^agaeine,} 

— --FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



RADIO 

ANTENNA BOOKS 




MEW STMi KOmONf 



ANTENNA 

HANDOOOK 



^O 



fbiH i-hHihf 






KTUMTP n Cffl HtfU*^ 



CUBICAI. 

QUAD 



4 ^^^ 



■Urn r«l_ia*«n«toi 






VHF ANTENNA HANDBOOK--The nevw ^HF ^^rFrerrne 
Handbook details Ihfi Ih&ory, da^ign, and construdion 
of hundreds oi ditfeFent VHF and UHF antennas, , a 
practical book wrlEten for the average amaleiur who 
tahes |oy in buitding, not full o1 complex forrriujas tor Iha 
design engineer. Packed wMh fabulous antenna projects 
you can build- BK7366 J5 95 ' 

• BEAM ANTENNA HANOBOOK (Nevtf Sih edj1i«41^— 
BKI19? — Vagi beam tfieory. construction and operation 
fnformanon on wira beanos, SWR curves and matcbirtg 
sysleins- A myst tor ssmous OXers, S5.95* 

• VHF HANDBOOK fOR ftA0«O AMATEURS- BH 1 198 
— Contains unloiTriation on FM thecvy, operalion B06 
equipnrent, '^Hf antenna desifln aAdcoostmciioa satei 
lite^EME. and the newest soj id-state ciruyits S6 95* 

• THE RADIO AMATtUn ANTENNA HANDBOOK- 
BK1199— Ad About *ire antennas, beam^ tttnefs, 
t>aluns, coax, radiats. SWR a/id towers. Clear arHJ com^ 
p«ete intofmauon 16 96' 

«SIMPL£« LOW DOST WIRE ANTENNAS FOR RADIO 
AMATEURS— BK 1200— All r>e4^data and everything you 
M^ant toknov^ about (ow-cost. rnutLi-band antennas, mex 
pensive beams, invt»*|ile antennas for ti^ms in 
'Houflti' iocar^ons S6 95' 




PRACTtCAL ANTENNAS FOR THE RAD«0 AMATEUR 
— A manuat descrilDing how to equip a ham station with 
a suitable antenna. A wide rarige of antanna topics, 
systems, and accessfories afe presented QivinQ the 
reader some food for thought and practical data tor con- 
stmction. Designed to aid the expefiencedi bani and 
novice as well Only BK1015 S9.95 ' 

73 OIPOLE AND LDNaWlRE ANTENNAS-by Edward 
M Noll W3FQJ. This is the hrsi collection of virtually 
every type of wire antenna use<l by amateurs. Includes 
dimensions, configurations and detailed! construct ion 
data for 73 different antenna types App«ndFces 
descnl>e the construction of notse bridges, line tu ners. 
and data on m^^suring resonant frei^uency. velocity 
factor, and swr SK1016 S5.50 ' 

• ALL ABOUT CUBICAL QUAD ANTENNAS (3nd edi- 
Iton)— BK1t9€— Ttit -Classic' dn Quid design, 
theory ^ construction, and pptrst^on. New 2nd edition 
con I tins new feed and matctiing ay items and new 
data. $S.95.- 



• HOW TO DEFEND YOURSELF AGAINST RADAR— OKI £01- t>y Bruce F Bogn@f and James R Bodnar^ a lavk^er 
and radar experrt Thjs book gives you the ammunition to challenge the radar ''evidence ' thai ijsuaUy leads 10 a 
speeding convl^Ction. the major pari pf the l>ooK detai ts the inner workings of radar — you'll become more of ai) sk- 
pen than most police officers and judges. The remainder oi the book outlines how to defend yourself against a 
speeding ticket — the observations, measures and testimony you must obtain 10 defend yourself without the help of 
a lawyer. The price \B a lot less than a fine! $6.95* 



MICROCOMPUTER BOOKS 



ANNOTATED BASIC-A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR NEO* 
PHYTES. VOL 1 4 l^AnnQtated BASIC explains the 
complexities of modern BASiC. It includes complete 
TRSaO' t^evel II 9ASIC programs that you can use. 
Each program rs annotated to explain in step by-step 
fashion the workings of the program. Programs are 
flowcharted to assist you in following the operational 
sequdoce. And— each chapter includes a description 
of tli«iidw concepts which have been mlroducedi. 
Annotated BASIC Volume 1 BK73&4 S10 95 
Annotated BASIC Votume^ BR73as $10.95 
Order Both Volumes and Save! BK738402 S1& 95 

KILOBAUD KLASSROOM— £>y George Young And Pe- 
ter Slark. Learning eleclronics theory without practice 
isn I easy And it's no fun to PuiJd &ri electronics proj- 
ect tt%ai you CMn^i use KiiQtaud Kfassroom^ th« popii' 
tar series first pubtist^ed in Kifobaud Microcontpurtfig^ 
comb^n^s theory with practice. This is a pr^cttcai 
course indigitaJ etectiomcs. It starts out with very stirv 
ple electronics projects, end by the end of ttie course 
you'll construct your own workir^g miCfoooiTiputer! 

Authors Young and Startt aie ejrperienced teachers^ 
and Iheir approach is simple and direct Whether 
you're learning at home or in the classroom, this book 
provides you with a solid background in electronics— 
and you 11 own a computer that you built yourself! 

BK73&6 S14,i5 

• 40 COMPUTER GAMES— BK73ai— Forty games rn all 
jn nine different categories. Games for large and small 
systems, and even a section on calculator games Many 
versions of BASIC used and a wide variety of systems 

represented A must for the serious computer games- 
man. $7,95' 

• UNDERSTANDING AND PROGRAMMING MICRO- 
COMPUTERS— BK7382— A valuable addition to your 
compulmg library This twopart lext includes the best 
articles that have appeared in 73 and Kilobaud 
Microcomputing magazines on the hardware and sofl* 
ware aspects ol microcomputing. Weil known autfiors 
and well- structured text helps the reader get involve<i. 
$10 96' 



TEXTEDIT— A Complete Word Processtng System In 
kltform— by Irwin Rappaport. TEATEDifr Is an Inexpen- 
sive word processor that you can adapt to suit your 
needs, from writing form letters to large texts. It is writ- 
ten in moduleSp soyou can load ami use only those pof- 
lions ihat you need Included are modules that perform 
fight justification, ASGH upper/lowercase conversion, 
one-key phrase entering, complete editorial functions, 
and much more! TEXTtDfT is written *n TflS-SO* Disk 
BASIC, and the modules are documented in Ihe 
authors admirably clear tutorial WTitir>g s^yle. Not only 
does irwin Rappapon explain how louse TEXTEDH; he 
also explains programmlr^ tectfniques impTemente<f 
in the system. TEXTEDIT IB an Inexpensive word pro- 
cessof that helps you tearn about ^BASfC program- 
ming. It Is written for TRS-80 Models I and III with TRS- 
OOS 2.2/2.3 and 3ZK. 'TRS-aO and TRSDQS are trade- 
marks of the Radio Shack Division of Tandy Cocpora- 
tton. eK73S7$9.97 



• SOME OF THE BEST FROM KILOBAUDMICROCOM 
PliTlNG— BK73t1— Acolieclronoi l*^ t^V. a^t'Ces mat 
have recently aj^pea/ed m Kilobaud' MICROCOMPUT 
ING Included is materia) on Itie THSao and PET 
systems. CPfM. the BOSQSOa&ZBO cNps. itie ASR-33 ter- 
minal Data Ijase management, word processing, text 
editors and file structures are covered too Programmmg 
techniques and hardcore hardware con struct ion proj- 
ects lor modems, high speed cassette interfaces and 
TVTs are also included in this large format. 200 plus 
page edihon, S10.95.* 



• THE NEW HOBBY COMPUTERS— BK7340— This 

book takes it from wfwre HOBBV COMPUTERS ARE 
HERET leaves oil, with chapters on targe Scale Integra- 
tion, how 10 choose a microprocessor chip, an introduc- 
tion 10 programming, low cost I/O for a computer, com- 
puter arithmetic, checking memory twards. .and 
much, much more' t^n t miss thfS tremendous valuel 



COOK BOOKS 



TTL COOKBOOK— by Don Lancaster, Explains what 
TTL is. how rt works, and how to use it. Discusses prac- 
tical applications, sucfi as a digital counter and dis- 
play systefT). events counter, electronic stopwatch, 
digital voltmeter and a digital tachometer. 
BKH)63 49 50.* 

CMOS COOKBOOK-- by Don Lancaster. Detatis the 
application of CMOS, the low power log^c family 
suitabie for most applications presenlly dominated by 
TTL, Required reading tor every serious digital cm- 
perimenlerf BKIO11 IIO.SQ.* 

TVT COOKBOOK — by Don Lancaster Describes Ihe 
use of a standard lelevision receiver as a mlcropro- 
cesser CRT terminal. Explains and describes charac- 
ter generation^ cursor control and interface Informs^ 
tlon in typical, easy-to-understand Lancaster styfe, 
BK10e4S9 95 * 



THE WELL 

EQUIPPED 
HAM SHACK 



t*m 



Vf JHTMB »! 



^yWagic of 





"^c^TLAS 




WORLD REPtATlR ATLAS— Completety updated, over 
230 pages of repeater usimgs aie imfexed by location 
ar>d frequency More than 50 maps pinpoint 2000 repeat 
er locations tnioughout the USA Foreign iisiings in- 
c^ude Europe, ff^e Middle East Soutti America. ar>d 
Africa *4 96" BK73"i5 

THE MAGIC OF HAM RAOiO-byJemjW Swank WBHXR 
t>egtns With a Pnef history of amateur radfoand of Jerry's 
involvement m ii Part 2 detarls many of Nm radio's 
heroic moments Mamdom's close ties with the conii- 
neni of Antarctica are me subtect of Part S In Part 4 the 
strange and hgmo^OMS s^de5 of ham ti^e gel thetr due. 
And what of ine future? Part 5 peers into Uw crystal ball 
$4.96 ' eK73l2 

A GUIDE TO HAM RADIO— by Larry Kahaner WB^NEL 
What s Amateur Radio all about? You can iearn the 
basics of this fasclnaimg ttobby with ttiis excellent 
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best way to 00 aboul gelling an FCC license. A Guide I0 
iHam Radio is an Ideal introduction to a hobby enjoyed 
by people around Ihe world. S4 95." eK7321 

WORLD RADIO TV HANDBOOK 1982. 2STH EDITION 
— Ttiir> book IS Ihe bible ot internal iona^ broadcasters, 
providing 1 he only authoritative source of exact informa- 
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This 1361 edition is completely revised, giving com- 
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5@0 pages of vital aspects of world listening. 
116 50 BKlifU 



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32i Te^tasMic^tronics 102,166 

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483 TMAC Products 105 

76 Tfac Electfonics ......,,. .59 

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88 Tufts Fladio Electronics 80. 81 

UniversarCommun teal ions , . , . ,98 
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V-J Products 44 

422 Valor Enterprises ,...., .45 

* Van Gorden Engineering ..59 

311 Vanguard Labs .,,....,, 152 

90 VoCom Producis Com. , 86 

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302 W-S Engineering 119 

479 V^^ahf .104 

BO Western Electronics . . 151 
83 Yaesu E lect ro n ic s Co. Cover 1 1 1 
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114 73 Magazine • July; 1982 



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TSMagazine • July, 1982 115 



Hm HELP 



I am looking for some ideas 
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supply. 

Dick levy WB3EVY 

1331 Hale St 

Philadelphia PA 19111 

1 am looking for a copy of the 
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Model 650 tube tester. I will pay 
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tarry Schuldt 

B45 Willow Rd. 
Marengo It 60152 



I need fnatructions for re- 
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postage^ 

Doug Ranz N8CDX 

PO Box 1425 

Warren Ml 48090 

I have a Jackson Electrical os- 
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W.A. L1es«keWB7PUP 

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116 73 Magazine • July, 1982 





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73Mag8zine • JufyJ982 117 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

eo^/tor/a/ t>y Wayne Green 



from p^ge $ 

found Haiti. The Bahamas are 
treacherous, so we were very 
tucky not to run onto any of the 
thousands of shoals and reefs. 

Exhausted by the storm, we 
found a protected bay and an- 
chored to rest. A couple of hours 
later, we awoke to find ourselves 
at gunpoint — faced by a bunch 
of excited Haitians who had 
sneaked atx^ard our ship. They 
spoke no English and no one In 
our group spoke any French. , . 
except me. I quickly started try- 
ing to rernember what I could of 
my high school French, twenty 
years unused and nnostfy forgot- 
ten. The menacing guns prompt- 
ed my memory. 

It turned out that these were 
police from nearby Mole St. 
Nicholas. They were convinced 
that they had captured a bunch 
of invaders bent on taking over 
Haiti and were looking forward 
to a good deal of publicity and 
perhaps rewards from the gov- 
ernment. The idea died hard, but 
I finally convinced them that we 
were a scientific team. How 
could I ever explain to these sim- 
ple people that we were hams 
bent on visiting a deserted is- 
land to set up a radio station for 
fun7 

WevtsHed the town. Have you 
ever visited a place where the av* 
erage Income is about $50 per 
year? Some of our welfare cus- 
tomers should have a chance to 
see what real poverty can be! 

From there we sailed across 
to Kavassa and looked It over. 
Hmmm. Formidable. Just one 
place to get up the cliffs which 
completely surround the island 
. * .and that via a wire rope lad- 
der, with the waves shoving your 
t}03t into the undBrcut cliffs 
where it would be instantly 
shredded. We went back to Haiti 
to rent some Haitians and a 
small boat so we could get the 
ham gear onto the island. 

At Cape Dame Marie, I once 
again managed to remember 
enough French to get the help 
we needed . . . and make the bar- 
gain. The head of the village 

lis 73Maganne • JulyJ982 



made the bargain and gave us 
two Haitians and a boat. We 
found out later that he had no In* 
tent ion of giving the two chaps 
one cent of the pay, We towed 
the boat with the Haitians be* 
hind our ship back to Navassa- 
On the way one of them man* 
aged to fall overboard. Luck was 
with us and one of our group 
was looking that way when It 
happened so we were able to 
stop and circle around to pick 
him up. Damned fool couldn't 
swim and he was thrashing 
around, which attracts sharks. 
He wouldn't have lasted ten 
minutes. 

With the help of the Haitians 
we got all of our ham gear from 
the boat to the top of the cliff. 
I'm afraid thai we had to do 
most of the work. It was hot and 
dry. The damned island is cov- 
ered with cactus and a wide vari* 
ety of bushes with burrs. They 
seem to jump out at you If you 
even get close to them^ 

We set up two stations, one 

right at the top of the cliff and 
the other a couple hundred feet 
away. We had an enormous gas- 
driven power generator, two 
complete towers with beams, 
and rotors. We spared no ex- 
pens© to t>e well equipped. Our 
main receiver was a Drake 1 A, a 
sideband (and CW) only receiv- 
er. That was a new way to go 
back in the early days of side- 
band. 

The ship headed back to Haiti 
after leaving us off, scheduled 
to retum for us In a few days. , , 
we hoped- Soon after the ship 
left, we found that we had a little 
problem. Oh, the rigs worked 
tine, but the heat was merciless 
and we found that our water 
supply was zilch. It turned out 
that the 50 gallons of water we'd 
brought had been in a rusty 
drum and had all leaked out on 
the trip down. Chet had noticed 
this and :30lved the problem by 
not bothering to bring the drum 
with us to the island. So we were 
faced with several days without 
water on this tropical desert is- 
land. 



A couple of us explored the is- 
land, hoping to find some water. 
At the very top of the island was 
a tower with a beacon light, It 
was powered by acetylene 
which was piped up from bottles 
kept in a small shed near the 
liny bay where we had our ham 
rigs. We found the remains of a 
house where, In earlier days, a 
lighthouse keeper had lived. Dio- 
ging down through the remains 
of the house we found a cistern 
under the rubble. It had quite a 
bit of slimy water still left in it 
,,,but water It was J 

We brought the water down In 
cans and bottles and boiled It. 
After a day we got tired of the 
boiling procedure and decided 
to see if this was really neces- 
sary. Ghet, who in many ways 
had managed to isolate himself 
from the rest of us^ was chosen 
(without his knowledge) to be 
the guinea pig. We gave him the 
untreated water and waited to 
see if he would survive. He didn't 
seem to notice anything so we 
all switched to untreated water. 

Navassa had not been active 
in many years so we had a ball 
on the air, knocking *em off by 
the thousands. Talk about pile- 
ups! 

When we were getting the 
equipment from the ship to the 
small boat and then from there 
up onto the Island, some of the 
key beam antenna elements 
managed to slip out of the 
sling and fall into the water 
at the base of the cliff. I had 
my scuba tanks with me just 
in case of something like th^s, 
so 1 was elected to go after 
the lost aluminum. 

It turned out that tte water 
was only at>out 60 feet deep 
right there so I was able to sur* 
face dive and bring it all up J can 
hold my breath for a minute or 
so and do pretty well in anything 
less than 75 feet without the 
scuba equipment. . .as long as 
It Is just going down and then 
back up again. The many sharks 
and barracuda put the others off 
from much swimming. I tried to 
assure them that the fish were 
just curious and to ignore them, 
but I wasn't vary convincing ap* 
parently. 

Once the plleups ran down, 
we packed up and sailed back to 
Haiti where a couple of us left to 
fly home and back to business. 
Four of the group came back 
with the ham gear to Nassau. I 
eventually got back most of my 
ham gear, but never saw my two 
scuba tanks again. 



I ran an article In CO on the 
DXpedltion, doctoring up the 
photo of the loading area and 
the cliff with a big '^W2NSD" 
sign. This seemed better than 
the Coast Guard graffiti which 
was actually there. Later DXp©* 
dittons to Navassa brought 
paint planning to cover up my 
W2NS0 with their calls. Not 
finding It, they painted their 
calls everywhere and made an 
awful mess. 

I have a great 16mm color 
movie of the expedition which 
might be of interest some day. 
My slides were, unfortunately, 
out on loan to a ham club at the 
time I was fired from CQ, and I 
was never able to get them back. 

In 1972, a group of hams from 
Atlanta decided to do a Navassa 
DXpedition trip and 1 got Invited. 
The leader was Chaz Cone 
W4GKF, who also runs the year- 
ly Atlanta Ham Festival and was 
recently involved with the new 
(8M microcomputer system. 

This lime we flew to Jamaica, 
where it was only an overnight 
boat trip to the island. Piece of 
cake. 

The Time article was In error 
on a couple of minor points. The 
description of amateur radio as 
a burgeoning (to grow or deveK 
op rapidly) hobby is nice to read, 
but a bit optimistic. And I don't 
know how one makes mutton 
stew out of a goat. Goat stew, 
sure. . . and it can be delicious if 
you don't know the name of the 
goat Involved. 

They are right about one 
thing: DXpeditionIng Is exciting 
and fun. it is adventure and I 
guarantee that if you break 
loose and go on one» that you 
will never forget one single min- 
ute of the trip, no matter how 
long you live. There are not 
many adventures left like that in 
our protective (perhaps overpro- 
tective) world. Giving a few thou- 
sand hams a new country mere- 
ly supports a branch of the hob- 
by which is of quesiionabie val- 
ue— country chasing. Few hams 
in rare countries enjoy the pres- 
sures this forces on them, which 
leads to rare countries being 
even rarer* . .thwarting one of 
the basic values of amateur ra* 
dio! International friendships. 

Maybe we could set up a new 
rule which would only give coun- 
try credit If you work a DXpedi- 
tion, 

CHINA! 

Speaking of adventure. . .and 
keeping in mind the recent acti* 



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73Magazine • JutyJ982 119 



vaiion of Clima. . .perhaps you 
can take the lime to break loose 
this tall and join me for a short 
trip to China. Ten of us went to 
Canton a little over a year ago 
and had an experience that 
none ot us wilt ever forget 

This fall, starting in late Octo- 
ber there will be a touf of the 
electronics shows in Tokyo. 
Seoul, Taipei and Hong Kong. 
Fronn there we will go to Bejing 
for a couple of days and then on 
around to other electronics 
shows in Munich and London. 
Yep, this trip not only will gel 
you into the most interesting 
places in Asia, including Peking, 
but is an around-the-world tour. 

in general, the touf allows a 
couple of days for each elec- 
tronics show and then one for 
travel, which means that the 
seven-city tour takes about 
three weeks. The cost is around 
$4,000 and that includes first* 
class hotels, all transportation^ 
and perhaps more meals than 
you may be able to handle. 
Some of the meals on these 
tours are spectacular. 

At the shows you get to see 
the latest in consumer electron* 
Ic equipment^ smaii computers, 
and so on- We'll be meeting 
hams, of course. If you are in 
electronics you may find some 
products to import, some firms 
which want your products, or 
firms to make things for you. 
These shows are about the only 
practical way to reach the small- 
er businessmen in Asia. 

II you7e Interested in racking 
up some memories for a life- 
time, drop me a note and I'll see 
that you get the dope on the 
tour. I've been on it twice now 
and find it first rate. 

AN ARRL RESPONSIBILITY 

Many years ago. an amateur 
organization was formed for the 
main purpose of providing lob- 
bying for the hobby and for fund- 
ing ^egal fights against laws 
which would be seriously harm- 
ful to the hobby. The League 
spent a fortune to put that new 
organization out of business, 
fearir^g any rivals. ,, even for 
IMirposes for which they were 
not responsible. 

Okay..Jhis, to my mind, 
puts some responsibility on 
their shoulders to stand up ^nd 
fight when restrictive laws are 
passed which are harmful to am* 
ateur radio. A case in point is a 
recent ordinance passed by the 
city of Burbank, Illinois. . .and 
this one is hard to believe. 

120 73Magazme • JulyJ982 



Firstly, they {list recently 
passed a one-year moratorium 

on issuing any permits for ama- 
teur antennas. Secondly, there 
is an $11 yearly fee for the In- 
spection of each antenna, with a 
$tO follow-up fee if the antenna 
does not pass inspection and 
has to t>e reinspected. 



Even antennas already in 
place must be registered, with a 
lot of legal details plus a proof 
of bond, proof of insurance on 
the antenna, proof of inspec* 
tlons, and so on. The bond, by 
the way, requires those respon- 
stbie for the installation to put 
up $5,000 which is kept by the 



NEWSLETTER OF THE MONTH 

This month marks the 12th part of 73's Newsletter of the 
Month series, it seems appropriate to close the first year ot 
the contest by reviewing our eleven winners.— N8RK. 

73' s August, 1981 1 pick was the Richardson Wireless Klub's 
Chawed Rag. We appreciated their decision lo cover upcom- 
ing club activities rather than the minute details of what went 
on at the last club meeting. 

September's choice, The Birmingham Amateur Hadio Ciub 
Newsletter, offered some good technical information. They 
included details about a simple RTTY station as well as fea- 
tured a monthly "Technical Corner" in which real-life prob- 
lems were discussed. 

The October winner came from the San Diego Repeater As- 
sociation. Squetch Tales boasts several pages of paid adver- 
tising each month. This defrays the publication costs, leaving 
the club's resources available for other projects. 

The name Squetch Tale (this time with no "s") popped up 
again in November. We applauded the Chicago FM Club for 
their newsletter's eye-catching appearance: a consistent, 
clean*looking layout that ensures readers will spend some 
time with each issue. 

Rounding out the 1981 winners was The Scuttlebutt, pub- 
lished by the Yankee Clipper Contest Club. The Clippers leave 
no stone unturned in a quest for ciub members who can pro- 
vide connections to keep the cost of producing the Scuftte- 
butt to a minimum. 

The Whealon Community Radio Amateurs' The Hamletter 
caught our eye in January, 1982, with its two*color priming job 
and large number of black and white photos. The Hamtetter 
masthead gives more than a list of officers; you'l I also find de- 
tails about when the club meets each month and where to 
look for the local repeaters and nets. These kinds of details 
make a newsletter friendly and helpful to new readers. 

Humor was a key feature in the February winner, The Na- 
ItotiQl Hampoort, This publication of the Cleveland-based 
South East Amateur Radio Club relates a lot of information 
about the doings of individual members in a good-natured, 
fun way. 

A statewide organization, the Wisconsin Association of Re- 
peaters, was recognized for its newsletter in the March, 1982, 
issue of 73. Our judges said. "A newsletter editor needs to 
keep in mind the audience he is trying to reach; if he gives his 
specialized audience the specialized information that they 
joined together to learn, they will be happy both with the 
newsletter and the club/' 

April's pick, the Metroplex Amateur Radio Communica- 
tions Association newsietter, was recognized for its beautiful 
layout. This publication is another example of utilizing the tal- 
ents of your club members— the editor is a commercial artist. 

The May winner, Kansas Amateur Badio, is a good example 
of the fact that a pubHcation doesn't always need the backing 
of a club. This statewide newsletter is a nonprofit venture that 
relies on readers for financial and editorial support. The result 
is very impressive. 

Rounding out the first year of 7Js Newsletter of the Month 
Contest was The Log, published by the Northern Ohio Ama- 
teur Radio Society. The Log includes something for everyone: 
reports for awards chasers, the contest crowd, DX hounds, 
traffic handjers and Novices. 



city. The wording of the ordi- 
nance could be constroed to 
force any amateur putting up his 
own antenna to put up this 
S5,000 bond. 

The real capper is the last part 
of the law which makes it iilegal 
to cause any interference to ra- 
dios, televisions, musical instru- 
ments, hi-fis, and so on. The fine 
set for this is a minimum of $25 
and a maximum of $1,000 for 
each offense. 

This sort of mischief must be 
fought. If it is permitted to stand 
in one city we can only expect it 
to proliferate, with each city 
pointing to the previous ones for 
legitimacy of the law. Yet fight- 
ing laws such as this, which 
seem silly, but which are laws, is 
an expensive undertaking. Who 
Is going to pay to fight these 
laws? 

I realize that there are a lot of 
amateurs who believe that any 
law must be obeyed and that it 
is un-American to even try to 
fight laws, good or bad The fact 
IE that there are a lot of really 
bad laws around and we either 
have to fight them or else give 
up more and more of our free- 
dom. 

You know, these same televi- 
sion viewers who gang up to 
force hams off the air will be the 
first ones to t>e screaming for 
ham communications when an 
emergency strikes. Speaking of 
emergency communications, 
the more we can organize this 
aspect of amateur radio, the 
stronger case we'll have when 
we have to deal with idiots such 
as the ones who put through the 
Burbank ordinance. Trying to 
reason with them as mere hob* 
byists trying to enjoy our hobby 
won't cut a lot of mustard. 

It's funny about our laws. 
There has been a lot of fuss late^ 
ly about driving and drinking, yet 
the courts seem to be fighting 
the laws and doing ail they can 
to make sure that these drunken 
turkeys are back In cars again. 
We had one up here who had a 
record of drunk driving. . .and 
t>eing let loose. He got soused 
one night, got behind the wheel 
...turned his truck over.*, 
some people helped him turn it 
back again and he went on a few 
minutes later to wipe out three 
kids when he drove over the line 
into their lane. The police gave 
him a drunk meter test, but the 
court wouldn't allow the results 
to be mentioned in the trial. And 
so it goes with laws. 

As far as crazy laws are con- 



lerned. we need to keep our 
iyes out for them and make sure 
:hat the ARRL, our onfy national 
:lub. IS held responsible for our 
srotection. Remember that they 
are our only club because they 
lave spent the money it took to 
shoot down all the others. Tm 
not pot-shotting the League— 
Dniy pointing out the facts and 
:he responsibilities which we, as 
Tiembers, have to hold them to, 

GEHERAL NOTES 

Every now and then a reader 
mllBS in with indignation that 
le (or she, rarely) has written me 
1 letter and \ have not personally 
answered. First, let me assure 
/ou that I do, indeed, read my 
Tiail. If you write to me, I will get 
[he letter The odds are not so 
^ood that you will get an 
inswer* for the simple reason 
:hat I am but one person and 
^ou, the reader, are one of about 
^50,000 who read my magazines 
sach month. You get the picture? 

The average magazine editor 
A^rites a paragraph or two a 
Tionth, an exercise not likely to 
get many readers fired up into a 
etter-writing frenzy. My ex- 
tended editorials in five monthly 
Tiagazines seem to flip the more 
JeHcately balanced (unbal- 
anced?) readers into an ennui 
Afhich is only surmounted by a 
ong letler to Wayne ,.. some 
enthusiastic and others vituper- 
ative, I seem to have a halo when 
/iewed from some angles and 
distinct horns from others. 

The fact is that I am someone 
A^ho is trying mightily to make 
jp for a deprived childhood, I 
'eaify wanted to get a small 
printing press when I was a kid 
and have been taking out the re- 



sulting frustration on a growing 
number of not very innocent by- 
standers, I've got one now and I 
am having a balL 

Mind you, whether 1 can 
answer or not, I do want to hear 
from you. If you have anything to 
tell me about some of my edi- 
torials, I am always open to 
more data. Emotional reac- 
tions? No. Reasoned argu- 
ments? Sure. And if you run into 
newspaper or magazine clip- 
pings I might have missed, t 
would really appreciate getting 
them. You probably already 
know about my Interests, such 
as anything to do with amateur 
radio, microcomputers, educa- 
tion, UFOs, radar, TVRO... 
things like that. 

If you have a subscription 
problem, Vn\ sympathettc but 
almost as helpless as you are. 
Send word of your problem to T3 
Subscription Dept., Box 931, 
Farmingdale IMY 1 1 737, and give 
a//of the details. If this manages 
to fail to help after about six 
weeks, the next step is to write 
to the Circulation Manager, 73 
Magazine, Peterborough NH 
03458. It that doesn't gel action, 
try General Manager Debra 
Boudrieau, Wayne Green, Inc.. 
80 Pine Street, Peterborough NH 
03458. If that, too, fails, let me 
know and J will rattle the chains. 
If you need a back issue, try 
your best to identify it We don't 
have a staff sitting around ready 
to try to find articles via a clue or 
two. Check our yearly index for 
hints. Check our Radio Book- 
shop for back issue prices. . , 
if wa have the issues. 

We have just enough people 
here to barely get the magazine 
out each month, so there is no 



one sitting around to give tech- 
nical help or to design circuits 
for you. If you do have a ques- 
tion, please send it to the Tech- 
nical Editor, 73 Magazine, 
Peterborough NH 03458, com- 
plete with an SASE. . .and then 
hope that he gets some time. 
For the most part, you want to 
try to deal with the author of an 
article, remembering that he, 
too, may be up to here In trying 
to keep up with correspon- 
dence. It is not unusual lor an 
author to get a thousand letters 
after a particularly interesting 
article. Now, how is he going to 
handle all of that? 

ARTICLES 

In the main, we are looking for 
construction projects. I have 
this bee in my bonnet about get- 
ting hams Into building again, 
even if I have to drag them kick- 
ing and screaming into it ... as I 
did with FM and repeaters. Boy! 
Did the readers hate FM when 1 
started with thati 

Articles are simple to write. 
You must type them in upper* 
and lowercase characters. You 
must double-space and leave 
generous margins on the pages 
for editing. We are now able to 
accept articles written on your 
TRS-80 I and 111. Send in both the 
disk and a double-spaced print- 
out. Then we will be able to do 
the editing on the printout and 
update the disk, finally dumping 
the edited article from the disk 
directly into our typesetting 
system. That will speed things 
up for us substantially. 

We Ye also looking for articles 
which may help encourage 
schools to set up ham clubs. I 
feel that the future of both 



amateur radio and the tech* 
nology of our country depends 

on this development. 

Photos are most helpful In 
making the article interesting 
for the readers. If you have built 
a gadget and are not equipped 
with a first-rate camerat please 
send in the unit so that we can 
shoot it. We have a Mamiya 
RB-67 and can do a professional 
job. No more fuzzy Polaroids, 
okay? It takes a large-format 
camera and good lighting to 
turn out a good photo. 

One more thing: Don't ever, 
ever send your article to two 
magazines at the same time. 

THE PHONE 

My apologies to readers 
wanting to get through to me on 
the phone. What with trying to 
manage six monthly publica- 
tions, nine separate divisions of 
the company, do consulting, get 
to shows, give talks^ keep up 
with the literature In two fields, 
and even ham a bit^ my time 
even for telephone calls is very 
limited. This means it is getting 
more and more difficult to break 
through to me. But if I don't do 
that^ I won't keep all these 
things growing, . .or be able to 
write all these editorials (/lo 
smart remarks}. 

In general, if my calMdarper- 
mits, rm available for talks to 
groups at $t,000 plus expenses 
for Sherry and me. Consulting 
runs about $500 a day plus ex- 
penses for the two of us, 
whether it Is worth it or not. The 
same goes for the talks. The 
steep prices make it so that I 
have more time to do my work 
,,. though I've had no com- 
plaints as yet. 



CORRECTIONS 



In the review of the CES 835 
Microdialer (May, 1982, p. 138), 
we stated an incorrect price. The 
correct price for this micro- 
phone is $99.95. 

Jeff DeTray WB8BTH 
73 Magazine Staff 

in the April issue, page tO. the 
article "Watching the Weather" 
will undoubtedly interest many 
hams having the old deskfax in 
their parts closet. 

There Is, however, one portion 
of the layout which in my opin- 



ion can be simplified and possi- 
bly be made less expensive. This 
involves the need to reduce the 
drum rpm from 180 to 120 which, 
in the article, requires a 40-Hz 
voltage amplifier. The same rpm 
requirement can be met by leav- 
ing the motor as a straight 
120-voltp 60-cycle unit and 
changing the output gearing. 

Standard gear catalog list- 
ings do not show a t.Q-inch-cen' 
ter distance with the required 30 
to 1 ratio. I guess nothing in our 
hobby comes easy, and a little 



work is required. There is, how- 
ever, a gear set which comes 
close to the 1.0-inch-center dis- 
tance spacing and the exact ra- 
tio. 
The data are as follows: 

• Worm Gear— 32 diametral 
pitch, face width 7/32, bore: .25 
diameter, hub diameter 11/16, 
projection 5^16, 60 teeth, 1.875 
PD; catalog #0-1132, item code 
13514. 

• Worm— 32 diametral pilch 
(double thread). PD .438, bore 
3/16; LTHB Item code 12922. 

• Source— local industrial dis- 
tributof handling Boston Gears. 
The manufacturer is Boston 
Gear Division, 14 Hayward St-. 
Quincy MA 02171, (617^32S-3300. 

Since the canter distance will 



now be 1.156 inches with the 
new gears instead of the origi- 
nal 1.0 Inch, it becomes an easy 
job with the help of a drill motor 
and a half-round file to lower the 
motor 5/32 of an inch. The worm 
will fit as is, but a new pin hole 
may have to be drilled. The worm 
gear must be reworked from a 
.250-diameter center hole to a 
.500 diameter. Once installed, 
the standard input of 120 volts 
at 60 Hz will drive the drum at 
120 rpm. 

This will eliminate the 80-kHz 
oscillator, the divider chain, the 
40-Watt amplifier, and, of 
course, the autotransformer, 

John Wafzke KBOXl 
^10 Shore Drive 
Pigeon Ml 48755 

73 Magazine • July, 1982 121 



FUN! 



10) How much money have you spent on amateur radfo wrthin the 

past year? (include QSL expenses, magazine subscriptions, club 

dues, and other incidental expenditures.) 

A) $0-S260— 39% B) $25VSS00— 30% C) $501 -$1,000—24% 
D) $l,00t-$2,500— 4% E) $2,501 and up— 3% 

A continued downward trend. 



John Edwards K12U 
78-56 mth Street 

GfendaleNY1f385 

THE POSTMAN RETURNS 

From Guam to Austria, Alaska to Florida, hams from all over the 
globe responded to the 1982 edition of the annual Funl poH. The 
results, as always, were fascinating, and I wish to thank everyone 
who participated. I also want to Ihank my postman, who once again 
risked his back delivering all those envelopes. 

Frankly, what always astounds me about this poll is not only the 
number of people who take the time to fill out a rather lengthy ques* 
tlonnalre, but also the number who write very long and generally 
thoughtful letters. Amateur radio will always be a vital hobby as long 
as there are people around who care about its future. 

So thanks once again to the 1,016 of you who wrote in. Here's 
what you had to say. 



ELEMENT 1— BACKGROUND 

1) Sex: 

A) Male— 91% B) Female— 9% 
A three percent increase in the number of female amateurs over iast 
year. An encouraging trend, but not conclusive enough to indicate a 
reai trend, 

2) Age: 

A) 15 or below— 5% B) 16-21—6% C) 22-39—49% 
D) 40*59—27% E) 60 and above— 13% 
Not very encouraging for our hobby's future. 

3) License class: 

A) Novice— eVij B) Technician — 10% C) General— 30% 

D) Advanced— 40% E) Extra— 14% 
Compared to last year, seems (ike there's been an upswing in 
upgrading. 

4) Number of years licensed: 

A) 1 year or less— 4% B) 1-5 years- 33Vi» C) 6-10 years— 
8% D) 11*20 years— 29% E) 21 years and up— 26% 
The o id- timers reign. 

5) Do you have a new (post-March 78) call? 
A) Yes— 45% B) No -55% 

The new caffs have an 8% increase over fast yean 

6) How many hours a week do you devote to amateur radio? 

A) 0-1 hour— 5% B) 2-5 hours— 29% C) 6^10 hours— 44% 
0) 11*20 hours— 16% E) 21 or more hours^67o 
About the same statistics as fast year. 

7} Which HF band do you most use? 

A) 80-75 meters— 15% B) 40 meters— 20% C) 20 meters— 
21% D) 15 and/or 10 meters— 35% E) Don^t operate HF— 9% 

As the sunspots diminish, so does 15- and 10-meter operation — 

down from 43% fast year. 

8) Which VHF-UHF band do you most use? 

A) 6 meters— 3% B) 2 meters— 71% C) 220 MHz-^6% 

D) 420 M Hz and/or up—1% E) Don't operate VHF-UHF— 19% 
Spread out, guys! 

9) Which mode do you most use? 

A) SSB— 41% 8) CW— 20% C) FM— 30% D) RTTY— 5% 

E) Other— 4% 

// CW is so great, why does its popularity keep dropping? 



ELEMENT 2— SOCIAL CHARACTER iSTtCS 

11) Has amateur radio influenced your career choice? 

A) Greatly— 25% B) Somewhat— 26% C) Not at ail— 49% 
Quite an impressive statistic, reatfy. 

12) Do you answer QSLs with no return postage? 
A) Yes— 76% 8} No— 24% 

The fact that the word "Novice" was etimfnated from this question, 
plus two postage incfeases, might account for the 20% positive 
response drop. 

13) Politically, how would you define yourself? 

A) Conservative— 40% B) Middle-of-the-road- 51% C) Lib- 
eral— 9% 
I've always fett hams were a pretty conservative tot, and it looks like 
my suspicions were correct. Being a C person, i feel pretty lonely. 

14) Do you think amateur radio wtll exist 2D years from now? 
A) Yes -87% B) No- 13% 

Hams are a pretty optimistic lot, 

15) Have you ever had a fight with a famiiy member over amateur 
radio? 

A) Yes— 71% B) No— 29% 
Wow! I want the first aid concession at the next hamfest. 

16} Do you have any relatives who are hams? 
A) Yes— 49% B) No— 51% 

17) Are most of your friends (more than half) hams? 
A) Yes— 40% B) No— 60% 

Taices one to know one^almost, 

18) Did you ever use a "cheat book" (not counting the ARRL License 
fiAanuaf) to upgrade your tjcense? 

A) Yes— 16% B) No— 84% 
No comment. 

19) if someone offered you five million dollars, tax-f ree. on the con-* 
dition that you give up amateur radio forever, would you? 

A) Yes— 81% B) No— 19% 
We raised the ante by four mfiiion over fast year and got 20% more 
takers. As for the other 19%, t still say every man has his price- How 
about 10 million? 

XI Do you belong to a local ham radio club? 
A) Yes— 457o B) No— 55% 

Not good enough. 

21) Have you ever attended a ham flea market? 
A) Yes— 79% B) No— 21% 

tf you havenX you don't know what you*re missing. 

22) Have you ever attended the Dayton Hamvention? 
A) Yes— 24% B) No- 76% 

/ haven't made it since 1978, but it was a gas! 

23) Would you pay five dollars to join the ARRL If they of- 
fered no magazine, QSL services, awards, or technical and 
instructional help? 

A) Yes— 22% B) No— 78% 
Guess it must be that great magazine that makes the League, f, for 
one, love to regale my friends on 15 with the latent activity reports. 

24) Would you like to see another national organization compete 
with the ARRL? 

A) Yes— 22% 8) No— 78% 
Hoo boy! Did I raise a hornet's nest Hith this one. One respondent 
even went so fares to caff me a rabbfe-rouser. I take no stand on this 
question, but fudging from the results, I certainty wouldn't invest my 
money in the stock of a competitor 



122 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



ELEMENT 3— OPERATING HABITS 

25) Would you favor a licensing system that had only two classes: 
NJovfce and General or Communicator and General? 

A) Yes— 58% B) No— 42% 
So much for incentive ticensing. 

IB) Would you like to see the FCC turn over amateur testing respon- 
aibility to clubs? 

A) Yes— 61% B) No— 39% 
Wany of those who were against were afraid of abuses, 

17) Do you think reJJgjous and polltically'Oriented nets have a place 
n ham radio? 

A) Yes— 79% B) No— 21% 
■iey, you guys who picked B. Haven't you ever heard of free speech? 

28) Should contests be outfawed? 

A) Yes— 31% B) No— 69% 
^motions ran hot and heavy on this one. 

?9) Do you think the FCC should assign excfusive frequencies and 
imes to nets? 

A) Yes— 7% B) No— 93% 
Vof a very attractive proposition. 

\0) Do you think the FCC should assign exclusive frequencies to 
epeaters? 

A) Yes— 20% 8) No— 80% 
don't tike the idea, either. 

H) Should there be a no-code, VHP and above, "Digital class ' 
jcense? This license would require a heavy theory test and carry no 
)hone or CW privileges (except perhaps for ID purposes). 

A) Yes— 34% B) No— 66% 
can 7 figure it: Some tetters were downright hostife to the inffux of 
:omputer users on the bands, as if they were taking over the hobby. 
Aany responder}ts seemed to welcome the digital ticket idea, but 
wt enough to make a majority. 

52) Should there be a no*code 220-MHz, "Communicator class" 
icense?This license would require a moderately difficult theory test 
ind carry only F3 privileges at a maximum of 60 Watts. 

A) Yes— 41% B) No— 59% 
\ hard core of respondents seemed to be against dropping the code 
est for any type of license. 

\3) Do you own a microcomputer? 

A) Yes— 39% B) No— 61% 
can't see how a technicalty-inctined person can be without one. 

A) What sort of CW sending device do you most often use? 

A) Straight key — 56% B) Keyer— 25% C) Bug — 4% 
D} Keyboard— 6% E) Never operate CW— 9% 
.ast year, t accidentally feff out bugs and received scores of tetters 
*sking why. This year, t insert the classification and find out only 4% 
fse them. Can't win. 

-5) if required, could you solidly copy CW at the speed at which you 
ifere licensed? 

A) Yes— 75% 8) No— 25% 
Compared with tast year, our skiits are diminishing. 

16} Have you ever purposely operated in an amateur subband you 
veren't Hcensed to use? 

A) Yes— 11% B) No-89% 
\bout the same as fast year, 

17) Do you think the FCC affects amateur radio in a positive 
nanner? 

A) Yes— 48% B) No— 52% 
\ tittle more positive than last year. 

'S) Do you ever speak to foreign, non*English*speaking hams in 
heir own language? 

A) Always- 3% B) Sometimes— 15% C) I attempt it— 25% 

D> Rarelr— 6% E) Never— 51% 
•/o substantial change over last year, 

B) Do you leei yourself competent to replace the finals in a tube- 
ype rig? 

A) Yes— 91% B) No— 9% 
^oes anyone stiit own a tutye rig? Only kidding! 



40) Do you feei yourself competent to replace the finals in a 
transistor-type rig? 

A) Yes— 80% B) No— 20% 
A soldering iron? t thought it was an electric cigar! 

41) Have you ever built an electronic project from a kit? 
A) Yes— 98% B) No— 2% 

A ham isn't a ham unless he*s unpacked at! of those little brown bags 
before opening the instruction booklet 

42) Have you ever "home-brewed*" an efectronlc project from a book 
Of magazine? 

A) Yes— 75% B) No--25% 
A bit down from fast year. For shame on those who haven't, 

43) Have you ever designed your own electronic project? 
A) Yes— 61% B) No— 39% 

Hasn't everyone? 

44) What do you think oi contesting? 

A) Great — 15% B) Good— 20% C) Okay— 17% D) Don't 
like it— 29% E) Despise it— 19% 
You're 59 New York. 

46) What do you think of DXing? 

A) Great— 40% B) Good— 31% C) Okay— 19% D) Don*t 

like it— 5% E) Despise it— 5% 
QSL via the bureau. 

46) What do you think of repeaters? 

A) Great— 35% B) Good— 30% C) Okay— 22% 0) Don't 
tike them— 8% E) Despise them— 5% 
Wait for the beep. 

47) What do you think of traffic handling? 

A) Great— 10% B) Good— 35% C) Okay— 40% D) Don't 
like it— 14% E) Despise it— 1% 

48) Do you pian to use Phase 111 OSCAR within a year of its launch? 
A) Yes— 28% B) No— 72% 

Looks tike that passband is going to get pretty crowded. 

49) Do you plan to use the new 10.1-MHz band within one year of its 
opening? 

A) Yes -40% B) No— 60% 
That should be around Jan. T, 2065, at the rate the U.S. Senate is 
moving. 

50) Do you believe amateurs should have the right to build, use^ and 
sell equipment for the reception of subscription television? 

A) Yes— 24% B) No— 76% 
/ should have left "se//" out of the question. Seems many amateurs 
think they should be able to pirate signals for their own use, but not 
for others. 



SELECTED COMMENTS 

Too many private repeaters tying up amateur frequencies. Some 
systems have only three people on them. — KB6B0, 

Morse code should be outlawed as a requirement, although I love 
it— K6XR. 

Amateur radio needs quality, not quantity. We should strive to keep 

the standards high. — WB5ZDP. 

We will keyboard and computerize ourselves away from the human 
fashion of ftam/nrrjg.- W4YDL 

Let's have more pofis— these are FUN!! — KF4W. 

/ think the Communicator class is a very good idea. I am partially 
deaf^ Code fS very hard forme. This may give deaf people a chance to 
communicate by RTTY, — KA7CYE 

After 21 years of hamming, I earned my Extra class license and not a 
word of congratutations from the ARRL or any manufacturer of ham 
gear,— KD1J, 

This has been the only column you've put in print that I knew aft the 
answers lo*— N7AVM. 

73 Magazine • July, 1982 123 



CONTEST 



Robert Baker WB2GFE 
15 Windsor Dr. 
A too NJ 08004 



CANADA CONTEST 

Starts: 0000 GMT July 1 
Ends: 2400 GMT July 1 

Sponsored by the Canadian 
Amateur Radio Federation 
(CARF), ttie contest is open lo 
ali amateurs, and everybody 
works everybody. Entry classes 
include single operator/all 
bands, single operator/single 
band, and multi-operator/single 
transmitter/all bands. There are 
separate smgle-operator QRP (5 
W dc, 10 W PEP out) and single- 
operator non-Advanced ama- 
teur classes. 

Use an bands from 160 to 2 
meters on CW and phone com- 
bined. All contacts with amateur 
stations are valid. Stations may 
t>e worked twice on each band, 
once on CW and once on phone. 
No crossmode contacts, and no 
CW contacts in the phone bands 
are allowed. 

EXCHANGE: 

Signal report and consecutive 
seriaf number starting with 001; 
VEt stations should also send 
their province (NS, NB, PEI>. 



SCORING: 

Score 10 points for each con- 
tact with Canada, 1 point for 
contacts with others. VEO 
counts as Canada. Score 10 
points for each contact with any 
GARF official news station 
using the suffix TCA or VGA, 
MulUptters are the number of 
Canadian provinces/territories 
worked on each band, on each 
mode (12 provinces/territories 
X 8 bands x 2 modes for a 
maximum of 192 possible mul- 
tipliers). Contacts with stations 
outside Canada count for points 
but not multipliers. 

FREQUENCIES: 

Phone— 18tO, 3770, 3900, 
7070. 7230, 14150, 14300, 21200, 
21400,28500,50.1, 146,52. 

CW— 1810. 3525. 7025. 14025. 
21025.28025.50,1,144,1 

Suggest phone on the even 
hours (GMT), CW on the odd 
liours (QMT), Since this is a 
Canadian-sponsored contest, 
remember to stay within the 
legal frequencies for your 
country] 



CALEHOAR 



Jull 

JullO-11 
Jul 17-18 
Jul 17 18 
Jul 24-26 
Aug 7-8 
Aug 14>15 
Aug 14-16 
Aug 21-22 
Aug 2V22 
Aug 26 29 
Sep 11-12 
Sep 11-12 
Sep 11-12 
S#fi 16-20 
Oct 2-3 
Oct 16-17 
Oct 16-17 
Nov6>7 
Hov 13-14 
Nov 20-21 
Dec 4-5 
Dec 11-12 
Dec 19 



CARF Canada Oay Contest 

lARU Radlosport 

international QRP Contest 

AS Magazine Worldwide SSTV DX Contest 

CW County Hunters Contest 

ARRLUHF Contest 

European DX Contest— CW 

New Jersey QSO Party 

SARTG Worldwide RTTY Contest 

45 Magazine FSTV UHF Contest 

Occupation Contest 

ARRL VHP QSO Parly 

European DX Contest— Phone 

Cray Valley RS SWL Contest 

Washington State QSO Party 

California QSO Party 

ARCI QRP CW QSO Party 

Pennsylvania QSO Party 

ARRL Sweepstakes— CW 

European DX Contest— RTTY 

ARRL Sweepstakes — Phone 

ARRL 160- Meter Contest 

ARRL lO^Meter Contest 

CARF Canada Contest 



AWARDS: 

A plaque will be awarded to 
the highest score single oper- 
ator/all bands entry. Certificates 
will be awarded to the highest 
score in eacft categoty In each 
provmce/territory, US call area, 
and DX country. 

ENTRiES: 

A valid entry must contain log 
sheets, dupe sheets, a cover 
sheet showing claimed QSO 
points, a list of muttiplierSp and a 
calculation of final claimed 
score. Cover sheets and multi- 
plier check tists are avaifabte. 
Entries should be maifed within 
one month of the contest, with 
your comments, to: CARF. PC 
Box 2172. Stn. D, Ottawa, On- 
tario KIP 5W4, Canada, 

Results will be published In 
7CA, the Canadian amateur 
magazine. Non-subscribers may 
include an BASE for a copy of 
the results. 



INTERNATIONAL 
QRP CONTEST 

Starts; 1500 GMT July 17 
Ends: 1&00 GMT July 18 

The first International QRP 
Contest is being sponsored by 
the World QRP Federation 
(WQF> and olfers a variety of 
awards for ieading stations. 
This is a CW-only event with 
separate categories for slngfe- 
or multi-operator stations, and 
for those operating fixed or por- 
table. Multi-operator stations 
may be on the air for the entire 
24*hour contest period, while 
single operator entries must be 
off the air for at least an eight- 
hour period. All stations may he 
worked once per band for QSO 
and multiplier credits. 

EXCHANGES: 

RST, QSO serial number, and 
class (599 001/20). Add X after 
RST If crystal-controlled (559X 
001 /2D). 

FREQUENCIES: 

The traditional QRP frequen- 
cies will be utilized: 1810, 3560, 
14060, 21060, and 28060, all plus 
or minus QRM. 

OPERATtNG CLASSES: 

1 = singie operator, 2 = mul- 
ti-operator, A = fixed station up 
to 2 Watts input or 1 Wall out- 
put, B = fixed station up to 10 
Watts input or 5 Watts output, 
C - portable station up to 2 
Watts input or 1 Watt output, 
D = portable station up to 10 



Watts input or 5 Watts output, 
and E = ORO stations of more 
than 10 Waits input or 5 Watts 
output 

SCORiNG: 

Count 1 point for QRP to ORO 
contacts, 2 points for QRP to 

QRP. For multipliers, count 1 if 
both stations are in the same 
country, 2 if the other station is 
in another country on the same 
continent, 3 if the other station 
is in another country and on 
another continent. For scoring 
purposes, all call areas within a 
country are counted as multi- 
pliers (e.g., 10 for W/K, 8 for VE. 
10 for PY, etc.). For crystal sta- 
tions with a maximum of three 
crystals per band, QSO and mul- 
tiplier points are doubled. Con- 
tacts with crystal controlled sta- 
tions count double. Band points 
are the QSO points per band 
times the multiplier points per 
band. Final score is the sum of 
band points from each band. 

A WA RDS: 

DbAGCW will provide awards 
for fixed station leaders and 
band leaders. QRP ARCI will 
provide plaques to the first 
place single- and mutti-operator 
portable stations worldwide 
plus certificates for the multi- 
ple- and single-operator porta- 
ble station in each country with 
two or more entries. 

ENTRfES: 

Send logs within six weeks of 
conclusion of the contest as 
follows; fixed stations to Sieg- 
fried Hari DK9FN, Spessart- 
strasse 80, D-6463 Sellgenstadt, 
West Germany; portable sta- 
tions to Wiliiam W, Dickerson 
WA2J0C, 352 Crampton Drive. 
Monroe Ml 48161, USA. 



INTERNATIONAL WORLDWIDE 
DX SSTV CONTEST 

Starts: 0000 GMT July 17 
Ends: 2400 GMT July 18 

This is the second annual DX 
SSTV contest sponsored by A5 
ATV Magazine. This is a 4a'hour 
SSTV video contest using 80 
through 10 meters within the 
recommended SSTV calling/ 
operating frequencies fisted 
below. To encourage use of all 
bands, extra fcx>nus points are 
granted on the 10-, 15-, 40-, 
and 80-meter band segments. 
Single- and multi-operator sta- 
tions are recognized with cross- 
band contacts not permitted. 
Individual contacts count only 



124 73MagBzine • JulyJ982 



once per band with repetitive 
muiti-band contacts acceptabie. 

CaiJslgns and vidao reports 
must be in 'Video'* form. Mug- 
shots of the station operator, 
family, or ff fends can count on(y 
once. Slower clocl<-rate speeds 
are encouraged in either 128/ 
16.5-second or 256/31 ^second 
timebases. Color work must 
contain a minimum of 2-color 
overlay to quatify with standard 
RG8 frame transmissions. Mo- 
tion SSTV must have a minimum 
of 2 frames sent with automatic- 
receive switching circuitry or 
manually operated switching by 
the receiving operator, and 
64 X 64 "quadrant" storage of 
no less than 4 separate pictures 
with repiays. 

SCORING: 

Each SSTV two-way contact 
is worth 5 points within the 
same country and 10 points for 
DX out-of-country. Contact 
bonus points are avaltable as 
follows: mogshots— 1 point, 
slow speed— 2 points, quad 
frame— 3 points, motion 
SSTV— 4 points, high resolu^ 
tion— 5 points, and color SSTV— 
10 points. 

A band multiplier of 3 can be 
claimed for contacts on 40 and 
30 meters, and 2 for contacts on 
10 and 15 meters. Stations with 
3ver 25 DX countries worked— 
add 25 points, 50 DX countries- 
add 50 points, and over 100 DX 
countries- add 100 points! 

fREQUENaES: 

Advanced/Extra— 3845, 7220, 
14230, 21340, 28680, 50.150. 

General— 3990, 7290, 14340, 
21440,28680,50.150, 

AWARDS: 

First*place winner receives 
3'year subscription (worth $60) 
to A5 ATV Magazine with ffoni- 
cover picture plus a Gold Cerlif i- 
cate. Second- and third-place 
wf oners receive one-year sub^ 
scriptions and Gold Certifi- 
cates. All entries regardless of 
score receive Gold Certificates 
suitable for framing. Results will 
be in the November issue of A5 
A TV Magazine. 

ENTRIES: 

Submission of logs and to- 
taled scores must be post- 
marked no later than August 1st 
and submitted to: Contest 
Manager. A5 A TV Magazine, PO 
Box H. Lowden lA 52255-0408. 
Logs will be returned as will any 
photos, etc. Some log sheets 



' 




RESULTS 

1961 PENNSYLVANIA QSO PARTY 
















^OSOs «nd Score) 












Top S<&ven — FAStem FA 






Oul o1 Slate » Top ^ 


r«fi 


KB3NQ 




369 


35,424 


Wfl3DJF 74a 


97^16 


AE3Y 


31 1 


2X072 


KA3DXR 




247 


22.244 


K30KW 543 


/y.40i 


VE3BR 


234 


1B,467 


W3YA 




102 


6,075 


AA3B 570 


77.166 


K2POF 


166 


11.500 


Ctr.Co. EOC A'yBSAELWBaDVH.WNSVAW) | 


KC5N 'm 


76.32a 


W2tM0 


171 


11,39a 






^ 


eit 


K3NB S39 


72,200 


K9G0F 


170 


I0.a5l 










N3AMK 563 


70,J37 


K1BV 


156 


8.677 




MobSes 




A 130 491 


57.GB4 


W1DWA 128 


7,943 


WASONT^m 




sm 


24.157 






W2EZ 


110 


7.755 








(from 9 counttest 


To|>S«ven— Western PA 




N2CIW 


H2 


7384 


K3BS/m 




327 


19,293 


A08J/3 502 


fi?B?a 


N4FAI 


110 


6.750 






tlrtKti 18 COunti&st | 


N3eeH/3 5f« 


51 ^16 








N2fiLTfm 




104 


4.368 


KA38FX ^e 


45,177 




Multl'Opvfatoc 










{frocn 6 ccHintiie^li 


KA3FMH ,TR? 


42,a64 


K371IF 


1384 


194.3)7 


Ctieck tog: 








WB3irr/3 396 


40.7fifi 


Ka3S 


526 


73.59(3 


W3HDH^m 




43:^ 


39 84§ 


AG3H 250 


:w.5O0 


k:icr 


583 


707SO 






Clfom 15 count^as)- | 


N3BIAV 390 


37A16 


AG3ft 


417 

Cfubt 


52,761 










CHibs 






Location 




Scofv 


Eiilrieft 


TofiScorar 


Penn Wireiefts As^ocJatiOfi 






Bucks County 




-125,570 


16 




WB3EWF 


Erie Amateur Raciio AssociatiOfr 






Ef<e 




296,651 


^ 




KA3BFX 


Nittariy Amateui' Radio Ciu& 






Stale Courage 




264.723 


13 




N3BaH 


Oelawam-Lefi^gh Amaimjr Radio Qubc 




North ampton Q0. 




217,510 


& 




K3ZUF 


Haz\B\Qn Amaieur Radio Cltjb 






H^elton 




161,728 


11 




AI30 


Penn Stale Urnv^rsity ftadio Qyb 






IJniv«rBtt¥ Pmk 




95,509 


3 




IQCR 


Franklord Radm Club 






Ptiira<Jeiph»a 




74.181 


2 






Mon Valte^ Amateur Rad^io Assocratiui 




Washington Co. 




73.5^ 


2 




— 


Murgas Amateur Radio Club 






Luzerne County 




^.399 


e 




WB3FYT 


Cartx>n ARCs 






Carbon County 




61.739 


4 




wa%i7F 


Poinl Radio Opefaling Society (PROS) 




Allegheny Co. 




36-231 


2 




■ — ■ 


Ha^'MSburg Amateur Radio Qlut 






Harrisburo 




3,'),??6 


4 




W3ADe 


Reading; Amateur Radio Club 






Bertes County 




33,198 


3 




WA3JXW 


Tioga County Amateur RadFO CI lib 






Tioga County 




26.929 


2 




— 


Mobile Sixer& 






Chester County 




S3S^ 


2 




'^ 



and DX country lists are avail- 
able from WB0QCD. 



CW COUNTY 
HUNTERS CONTEST 

Starts; 0000 GMT July 24 
Ends: 0200 GMT July 26 

The CW County Hunters Net 
Invites all amateurs to par- 
ticipate in tills year's contest. 
AM mobile and portable opera- 
tion in less-active counties is 
welcomed and encouraged. Sta- 
tions may be worked once on 
eachi bandf and again if tlie 
station has changed counties. 
PortabJe or mobile stations 
changing counties during the 
contest may repeat contacts for 
QSO points. 

EXCHANGE: 

QSO number; category (P for 
portable, M tor mobife).- RST; 
state, province, or country; an<ji 
US county. Stations on county 
lines give and receive only one 
QSO number, but each county is 
valid for a multiplier. 

FREQUENCIES: 

Frequencies are 3575, 7055, 

14070. 2107a and 28070. It is 
strongly requested that only P or 
M category stations calf CQ or 



QRZ on 40 meters below 7055 
and on 20 meters below 14070, 
with all other stations spreading 
out above those frequencies- 

SCORfNG: 

QSOs with fixed stations are 
1 point, QSOs with portable or 
mobile stations are 3 points. 
Mufti ply the number of QSO 
points limes the number of US 
counties worked. Mobiles and 
portables calculate their score 
on the basis of total contacts 
within a state for the state cer- 
tificate, and calculate their 
score on all operation if they 
operated from more than one 



state in competition for the High 
Portable or High Mobile Trophy. 

A WA RDS: 

Certificates wilt be awarded 
in three categories; 

1) Highest fixed or fixed- 
portable station in each state^ 
province, and country with 1,000 
or more points. 

2) Highest station In each 
state operating portable from a 
county which is not his normal 
point of operation, with 1,000 or 
more points. 

3) Highest station in each 
state operating mobile from 3 or 
more counties with a minimum 



RESULTS 

RESULTS OF 45 4 TV MAGAZtHE 
WORKED ALL STATES SSTV CONTEST 

(Full results appeared in the June issue of A5 ATV Magazine, 
PO Box H, Lowden lA 52255-04064 

The top 5 entries from 59 entries received: 

1st— Luis Chartarifsky XE1LCH 
2nd— Roland Soucie N6WQ 
3rd— Larry Benaon K9KQO 
4th— John Hudak llf KA3X 
5th— Harry Harchan W2GND 



73 Magazine • July, 1982 125 



of 10 QSOs in at least each of 3 
counties. 

Trophies wiij be awarded to 
the highest single-operator sta- 
tion in the US fn categories P 
and M. The Awards Committee 



may issue acidttional awards. 

ENTRfES: 

Logs must show category, 
date/time in GMT, station 
worked, band, exchanges, QSO 



pointSj locatron, and cfaimed 
score. All entries with 100 or 
more QSOs must incfude a 
check sheet of counties worked 
or be disqualified from receiving 
awards. Enclose a large SASE if 



results are desired. Logs must 
be postmarked by September 
1st and sent to: CW County 
Hunters Net, do Jeffrey P. 
Bechner W9MSE, 673 Bruce 
Street Fond du Lac Wl 54935. 




Chod Harris VP2f\^L 

Box 4881 

Santa Rosa CA 95402 

CHINA 

China. The very word conjures 
up visions of mystery and Marco 
Polo. And to DXers China means 
Number 1 on everyone's Most 
Wanted List. The OX Bulletin an- 
nual survey (the benchmark of 
the Most Wanted Lists) con- 
tinues to show China In the top 
spot again this year. 

Over the past few years, the 
China rumors have been flying 
thick and fast. "China will be 
opening soon/' "Hundreds of 
China stations will start operat- 
ing next week." And so ori. One 
prominent New Zealand ama- 
teur came within inches of spur- 
ring China into the amateur 
radio arena, but his US citizen- 
ship sabotaged the effort. 

The positive attitude of the 
China authorities encourages 
the rumors and rumor-followers. 
Unlike many countries where 
amateur radio is flatly prohib- 
ited, China has been enthusias- 
tic about the future role of 
amateur radio. It is Just a matter 
of time. 

That time may have finally 
come. On March 29, BY1PK ap- 



peared on 15 meter CWj working 
(of course) JAs. 

Tom Wong VE7BC clearly per- 
forms the role of hero in this 
operation. His tireless efforts 
over the past few years have just 
begun to provide fruit. Tom has 
been instrumental in funneling 
equipment, training materials, 
books, and expertise from the 
ARRL and other Stateside or- 
ganizations to the appropriate 
authorities In China. 

The BY1PK operation repre- 
sents not a one-shot, contest- 
style operation, but the re- 
awakening of amateur radio in 
the most populated country in 
the world. Although China will 
move slowly in the amateur 
radio field, it is moving in the 
right direction, and the next few 
years should see that Number 1 
ranking slip further and further 
down the Most Wanted survey. 

The "Other" China 

The neophyte DXer, un- 
familiar with the prefix BY, 
might turn to the International 
Prefix Allocation List to locate 
the source of the signals. The 
list shows all the B callsigns as 
belonging to China. The Call- 




in addition to working on his monthly DX column for 73 Magazine, 
Chod Harris VP2ML leads a very demanding lite. Here he's shown 
slaving away at his VP2 QTH. 

126 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



booli shows no China amateurs. 
Or does it? 

Just before the BY listing in 
the Caffbook Is the BV listing: 
two amateurs. If the BY call sig- 
nifies China, what does the BV 
signify? Answer: The "other*' 
China — our former ally, Taiwan, 
the Republic of China. 

Not to be confused with the 
People's Republic of China, 
Taiwan is the last refuge of the 
anti-Communist forces driven 
out of mainland China after 
World War II. The Nationalist 
government of Taiwan con- 
siders itself to be the legitimate 
authority over all of China, 
hence the BV callsign. 

But only two amateurs in a 
country as rich and weil popu- 
lated as Taiwan? A small ama- 
teur population ^s more typicai 
of a smaller, undeveloped coun- 
try, a distinction hardly appro- 
priate for industrial Taiwan. So 
why only two hams? 

The question is not why there 
are only two amateurs in Tai- 
wan, but rather why there are 
any amateurs at ail. Taiwan con- 
siders itself still at war with the 
mainland government. Both 
sides would like the other to go 
away, to reunite the country 
(shades of Korea and Vietnam 
here). And military governments 
under states of war or emer- 
gency are notoriously reluctant 
to allow free use of the ama- 
teur bands. 

One of the very first proc- 
lamations under the martial law 
in Poland was the crackdown on 
amateur radio activities. Even In 
the US, amateur radio activity 
Ceases during wartime. 

We can understand why a 
country at war would feel un- 
comfortable about permitting 
unrestricted use of the amateur 
bands. The independence of the 
amateurs and the tremendous 
flexibility of amateur equipment 
are powerful communications 
tools to those on the outs with 
the government. 

The increasing use of ama- 
teur radio gear in illegal drug 
shipments demonstrates that 
ham radio equipment and exper- 
tise can be a disturbing factor in 
sensitive political differences. 



Hence many countries simply 
prohibit all amateur radio ac- 
tivities; witness Albania, for 
example. 

So we return to our original 
question: Why is there any ama- 
teur radio activity at all from a 
divided country engaged in a 
*'civil waf"? 

First, there is really only one 
amateur in Taiwan, with two 
callsigns; Tim Chen operates 
BV2A on CW and BV2B on SSB, 
Somehow a single individual 
has obtained permission to 
operate amateur radio in Tai- 
wan. But that permission is 
probably the most restricted 
amateur radio authority short 
of a flat-out ban. Tim's operat- 
ing authority restricts him to 
specified times and frequen- 
cies. Can you imagine your radio 
license specifying the exact fre- 
quency and time of operation? It 
would certainly pot a crimp In 
your DXing. 

Fortunately for DXers through- 
out the world, Tim maintains his 
activity, keeps to his schedules, 
and regularly provides QSLs 
from the ^'other" China. 

Look for Tim Wednesdays be- 
tween 1200 and 16002 on one of 
the following frequencies: 
14025, 14040, 14218, or 14250, 
Tim usually shows up on CW 
first and switches to SSB a little 
later, Tim also has operating 
permission Saturday from 2300 
to 0200Z. When band conditions 
permit 15-meter operation, Tim 
operateson 21030, 21110, 21270, 
and 21350. And more recently 
Tim has added the lO-meter 
frequency of 28530 to the 
possibilities. 

Tim QSLs consistentiy either 
direct to Box 101, Taipei, Tai- 
wan, Republic of China, or via 
QSL manager K2CM at his Call- 
boo f( address. 

If you hear BV2B on 20 meters 
and have trouble breaking 
through the pileup^ perhaps 
your choice of phonetics could 
use improvement. Let's con* 
tinue our discussion from last 
month. 

PHONETICS 

Last month we discussed the 
different l^inds of phonetic call- 



signs: standard, place names, 
and '*cute" phonetics. Now we 
look at how you evaluate your 
own choice of phonetics and 
how yoy can select alternate 
phonetics. 

A phonetfc call should have 
two characteristics: The call 
must be unambiguous, and it 
should punch through the 
pHeup, Removing ambiguity 
from a potential phonetic call- 
sign is easy: Pick easily recog- 
nized words which have no com- 
mon homophones (a word that 
sounds similar, but is spelled 
differently). 

A couple of examples of what 
not to do might illustrate this: A 
W5 called me using "'Motel" as a 
phonetic. The confusion be- 
tween this and ''Hotel" is ob- 
vious. And one Field Day, an 
amateur called me with the 
phonetic suffix, "Fuzzy Wuzzy 
Wabbftr' I was forced to ask for 
clarification: *1s that R as in 
Rabbit or W as in Wabbit?" Back 
came the reply, "Wabbitl Wab- 
bit, wabbit, wabbitT' Memor- 
able, but not very effective in a 
DX piieup. Stick with less con- 
fusing phonetics. 

Selecting a phonetic call 
with punch Is more difficult. I 
suggest going to a station 
equipped with an oscilloscope 
monitor of the outgoing signal. 
Try different phonetics and 
combinations of phonetics 
while watching the scope. Look 
for those phonetics which give 
the greatest average output, or 
the "blockiest" output pattern. 
Lacking a scope, try watching 
the relative power output meter 
on your rig. Again, try to keep 
the average power as high as 
possible. 

The two "cute" phonetics 
mentioned last month fWI No- 
Good and WA9BlackWhiteYel' 
low) are very effective because 
they share the two most impor- 
tant characteristics of good 



phonetics: They are unam- 
biguous and they really cut 
through the pileups. Watch your 
output meter while saying "No 
Good" or "Black White Yellow" 
to see what a good phonetjc 
does for your average output. 

Also, individLfal amateurs in 
foreign countries might have a 
particular difficulty with one of 
your choices. For one reason or 
another, an amateur might have 
a block against that particular 
phonetic and fait to understand 
even under good conditions. Be 
flexible, and don't be afraid to 
shift to a backup set of 
phonetics when the first fails 
after a couple of tries. On the 
other hand, wait until the DX sta- 
tion is obviously struggling with 
the call before you switch your 
phonetics. You use phonetics to 
reduce ambiguity, and throwing 
dozens of different phonetics at 
the DX station will more likely 
confuse the poor DXer and de^ 
crease the chances for a suc- 
cessful contact. Keep your dif- 
ferent phonetics to a minimum 
and use an alternate set only 
when necessary. 

I found that three sets of 
phonetics covered almost any 
situation. A short, punchy set 
worked for good conditions, 
where I knew my call would get 
through, or for tailending: 
''Sugar Queen Baker/' I tried a 
slightly longer set when the first 
one failed: "Sierra Quebec 
Bravo." Thrs set had the advan- 
tage of very high average out- 
put; I could realiy hang the reia- 
five power output meter up with 
Number 2. The final set was the 
lousy condition set: "Santiago 
Quebec Bolivia," to be used only 
under adverse circumstances, 
when repetition of the other two 
failed miserably. I used this 
phonetic after contact was 
established. If the DX station did 
not have my call correctly, or 
continued to struggle with the 



AW/\R{>S 



Biff Gosney KE7C 
MicrO'SO, Inc, 
2665 North Busby Road 
O&k Harbor WA 98277 

WORKED ALL 20NES 

The WAZ award will be issued 
to any licensed amateur station 



presenting proof of contact with 
the forty zones of the world. This 
proof shall consist of proper 
QSL cards which may be 
checked by any of the autho- 
rized CQ checkpoints or sent di- 
rectly to the WAZ Award Man- 
ager, Mr. Leo Haijsman W4KA, 



call, I would switch to the longer 
phonetic. 

Many amateurs use phonet- 
ics for the suffix of their call but 
ignore the prefix. When the only 
stateside calls began with K, W, 
WA, and WB, the possibilities 
for error remained smalL But 
even the advent of WD calls 
rapidly discredited this practice. 
The current proliferation of simi- 
lar sounding prefixes (KB, KD^ 
KB) makes the use of phonetics 
for both prefix and suffix 
mandatory. 

Testing Your Chotce 

The ideal way to test your 
phonetics is to get on the air and 
start throwing your call into 
pileups. Does the call get 
through? Do the DX stations get 
you real I correctly? The best test 
of a given set of phonetics is 
success. If it works, try it again. 
If it works again and again, use 
it a lot. If it does not cut the 
pileup, try another combination 
until you find the most effective. 

One sure sign that a given 
phonetic doesn't work for your 
combination of vome and sta- 
tion Is a pattern of consistent er- 
ror when the DX station comes 
back to you. For example, I 
quickly found that "Whiskey 
Alpha One Sierra Queen Bravo'* 
was often answered with WAIS 
something B." Watching the 
output scope showed me the 
problem: Output dropped to 
near zero on the ''Queen." 
That letter wasn't getting 
through. A switch to *'Quetaec'' 
(although opening the door for 
confusion with Canadian sta- 
tions) eliminated the iost letter 
phenomenon. 

More Than One? 

After experimenting in front 
of the output monitor (into a 
dummy load or empty band, of 
course) and testing the DX 
waters in numerous pileups, you 



will find a phonetic call which 
meets the requirements of lack 
of ambiguity and good penetrat- 
ing power. You will be tempted 
to use this phonetic caii in every 
DX circumstance. Unfortu- 
nately, life, and especially 
DXing, is not that simple. The 
best set of phonetics for one 
band or band conditions might 
not be competitive at another 
time. A short, snappy phonetic 
call might be just the thing for10 
meters when it ts wide open, but 
the same combination on 80 
might be destroyed by a single 
static crash. 

Finally, phonetics are very 
personal. What works for one 
voice, rig, and microphone 
might not work for another com- 
bination. Guest operators at the 
big contest multi-multis are 
familiar with thrs problem. Each 
operator has to experiment to 
find the phonetics which work 
best. Meanwhile, see you In the 
pileups! Next month we'll have a 
treat for the CW DXers, as we ex- 
amine zero-beating. 

NOTES FROM ALL OVER 

J01CRA gives the folf owing 
address for WHUAAB: Hide-haru 
Afmono, 2644 Tsuruda, Utsuno- 
miya-City, Tochigi, 320 Japan. 
N0BNY reports a July operation 
from VP2K (on his honeymoon!). 
Pat also QSLs the VP1MK op- 
eration at his home address: 
2770 South 13th Street, Omaha 
NE 68108, with SASE. K9MK/5 
handles his own QSLs for his 
/VP2A and /V2A operations at 
6061 Dunson Court, Watauga TX 
76148. V2AMK should beQSLed 
to N0DH/7 at 2031 East Gary, 
Mesa AZ 85203. And finally Nick 
Percivat 9Y5NP of the Trinidad 
and Tobago Amateur Radio 
Society announced the 50 Years 
of Amateur Radio special prefix 
for his country: 9Y50. Look for 
Nick and other Trinidad ama- 
teurs using this prefix for the 
rest of 1982, 



1044 Southeast 43rd St., Cape 
Coral FL 33904. Many of the ma- 
jor DX clubs in the US and 
Canada and most national ama- 
teur radio societies abroad are 
authorized CQ checkpoints. If in 
doubt, consult the WAZ Award 
Manager. Any legal type of emis- 
sion may be used, providing 
communication was estab- 
lished after November 15, 1945. 

The officiai CQ WAZ Zone 
Map, and the printed zone list 
which follows these rules, will 



be used in determining the zone 
in which a station is located. 

Confirmation must be accom- 
panied by a list of claimed 
zones, using CQ form 1479, 
showing the call letters of the 
station contacted within each 
zone. The list should also clearly 
show the applicant's name, calf 
letters, and complete mailing 
address. The applicant should 
indicate the type of award for 
which he Is applying, such as 
all-SSB, all-CW. or mixed. In re- 

73 Magazine • July, 1982 127 



mote locations and fn foreign 
countries, a handwritten list 
may be submitted and wHI be ac- 
cepted for processing, provided 
the above information is shown. 
Ail contacts must be made 
with licensed, land based, ama- 
teur stations operating in au- 
thorized' amateur bands* 

All contacts submitted by the 
applicant must t>e made from 
within the same country. It is 
recommended that each QSL 
clearly show the station's zone 
number. When the applicant 
submits cards for multiple call- 
signs, evidence should be pro- 
vided to show that he or she also 
held those call letters. 

Any altered or forged confir- 
mations will result in permanent 
disqualification of the ap- 
plicant. 

Include with the application 
the processing fee (subscribers, 
S4,00; non-subscribers, SIO.OO) 
and a self-addressed envelope 
with sufficient postage stamps 
or international reply coupons 
to return the QSL cards by the 
ciass of mail service desired and 
indicated. CO subscribers 
should include a recent mailing 
label (or copy) with application. 
International reply coupons 
equal in redemption value to the 
processing fee are acceptable^ 
Checks should be made out to 
Mr. Leo Haijsman, WAZ Award 
Manager. 

in addition to the convention- 
al certificate for which any and 
all bands and modes may be 
used, specially endorsed and 
numbered certificates are avaiN 
able for phone and single-side- 
band operation. The phone cer- 
tificate requires that all con* 
tacts be two-way phone; the 
SSB certificate requies that ail 
contacts be two-way SSB. 

If, at the time of the original 
application, a note is made 
pertaining to the possibility of a 
subsequent application for an 
endorsement or special certifi- 
cate, only the missing confirma- 
tions required for that endorse- 
ment need 1^ submitted with 
the later application, provided a 
copy of the original authoriza- 
tion signed by the WAZ manager 
Is enclosed. 

Decisions of the CO DX 
Awards Advisory Committee on 
any matter pertaining to the ad^ 
ministration of this award will 
be final 

All applications should be 
sent to the WAZ Award Manag- 
er, W4KA, after the QSL cards 

128 73 Magazine • July, 1962 



have been checked by an au- 
thorized CQ checkpoint 

Zone maps, printed rules, and 
application forms are available 
from the WAZ Award Manager 
Send a self-addressed envelope, 
4'x9Vm' with 2Sc postage, or 
a self-addressed envelope and 
2 IRGs. For rulings on border* 
line areas, consult the WAZ 
Award Manager. 

SINGLE-BAND WAZ 

Since January 1, 1973, WAZ 
awards have teen Issued to 
licensed amateur stations pre- 
senting proof of contact with 
the 40 zones of the worid on one 
of the five high<frequency 
bands, 80-10 meters. Contacts 
for a single-band WAZ award 
must have been made after 0000 
hours GMT, January 1, 1973. 
Proof of contact shall consist of 
proper QSL cards checked by 
the DX Editor, the WAZ Manag- 
er, or an authorized CQ check- 
point Single-band certificates 
will be awarded for both two- 
way phone, including SSB, and 
two-way CW. The single^band 
WAZ program is governed by the 
same rules and uses the same 
zone boundaries. 

S-BANDWAZ 

On January 1, 1979, the CODX 

OeparlmenL in cooperation with 
the CO DX Awards Advisory 
Committee, announced the 
5-band WAZ. 

Applicants who succeed in 
presenting proof of contact with 
the 40 zones of the world on the 
five high-frequency bands— -00, 
40, 20, 15, and 10 meters (for a 
total of 200)— will receive a 
special certificate in recognition 
of this achievement. 

These rules were in effect as 
of July 1, 1979, and supercede 
all other rules. Five-band WAZ 
will be offered for any combi- 
nation of CW, SSB, phone, or 
RTTY contacts, mixed-mode on- 
ly. Separate awards witi not be 
offered for the different modes. 
Contacts must have t^een made 
after 0000 hours GMT, January 
1, 1979. Proof of contact shall 
consist only of proper QSL 
cards checked by the WAZ 
Award Manager, W4KA. The 
first plateau will be a total of 1 50 
zones on a combination of the 
five bands. Applicants should 
use a separate sheet for each 
frequency band, using CO form 
1479- 

A regular WAZ or single-band 
WAZ will not be a prerequisite 
for a 5-band WAZ certificate. All 



applications should show the 
applicant's WAZ number. 

After the 150-zone certificate 
is earned, the final objective is 
200 zones for a complete 5-band 
WAZ. CQ is donating plaques 
for the first S winners, after 
which the applicant will have a 
choice of paying a fee for his 
plaque and/or applying for an 
endorsement commemorating 
this achievement 

The applications should be 
sent to the WAZ Award Manag- 
er, W4KA. The 5-band award is 
governed by the same basic 
rules as for the regular WAZ and 
uses the same zone boundaries. 

THE WPX AWARD 

The CQ WPX award recog- 
nizes the accomplishments of 
confirmed QSOs with the many 
prefixes used by amateurs 
throughout the world. Separate 
distinctively-marked certifi- 
cates are available for 2 X SSB, 
CW, and mixed modes, as well 
as the VPX award for shortwave 
listeners and the WPNX award 
for Novice amateurs. 

All applications for WPX cer- 
tificates (and endorsements) 
must be submitted on the offi- 
cial application form CQ 1051 A. 
This form can be obtained by 
sending a self-addressed 
stamped envelope to the WPX 
Award Manager, Bob Hunting- 
ton K6XP, 5014 Mindora Dr.. Tor- 
rance CA 90505, It Is highly de- 
sirable to use business-size en- 
velopes, 8Va" X 11", for this 
purpose. 

All QSOs must be made from 
the same country. AM call let- 
ters must be in strict alphabetic 
cal order and the entire call 
must be shown. All entries 
must be clear and legible. 

Certificates are issued for the 
following modes and numbers 
of prefixes (crossmode QSOs 
are not valid for the CW or 2 x 
SSB certificates): mixed (any 
mode) — 400 prefixes confirmed; 
CW— 300 prefixes confirmed; 
2 X SSB— 300 prefixes con- 
firmed. Separate applications 
are required for each mode. 

Cards need not be sent but 
must be in the possession of the 
applicant. Any and all cards may 
be requested by the WPX Award 
IVIanager or by the CQ DX 
Committee* The application fee 
for each certificate Is $4.00 for 
subscribers and $10.00 for non- 
subscribers, or the equivalent in 
IRCs. All applications and 
endorsements should be sent to 
the WPX Award Manager, 



Prefix endorsements are is- 
sued for each 50 additional pre- 
fixes submitted. Band endorse- 
ments are available for worfting 
the following numbers of 
prefixes on the various bands: 
1.8 MHz— 50; 3.5 MHz— 175; 7 
MHz— 250; 14 MHz— 300; 21 
MHz— 300; and 28 MHz— 300. 
Continental endorsements are 
given for working the following 
numbers of prefixes in the re- 
spective continents: North 
America — 160; South Amer- 
ica— 95; Europe— 160; Afri- 
ca— 90; Asia— 75; and Oceania 
—60. Endorsement applica- 
tions must be submitted on CO 
form 1051A, Use separate appli- 
cations for each mode and be 
sure to specify the mode of your 
endorsement application. For 
prefix endorsements, list only 
additional call letters confirmed 
since the last endorsement ap- 
plication. 

A self-addressed envelope 
and SI ^00 or 5 iRCs are required 
for endorsement stickers. 

The two or three letter/ 
numeral combinations which 
form the first part of any ama- 
teur call will t>e considered the 
prefix. Any difference in the 
numbering, lettering, or order of 
same shall constitute a sepa* 
rate prefix, The following would 
be considered different: W2, 
WA2, WB2, WN2. WV2. K2, and 
KN2. Any prefix will be consid* 
ered legitimate If Its use was U- 
censed or permitted by the gov- 
erning authority in that country 
since November 15, 1945. 

A suffix would designate por- 
table operation in another coun- 
try or call area and would count 
only if it is the normal prefix 
used in that area. For example, 
K4t]F/KP4 would count onty if it 
is the normal prefix used in that 
area. For example. K4IIF/KP4 
would count as KP4. However, 
KP4XX/7 would not count as 
KP7 since this is not a normal 
prefix- Suffixes such as/M, /MM, 
/AM, /A, and fP are not counted 
as prefixes. An exception to this 
rule fs granted for portable 
operation within the issued call 
area. Thus, contacts with a spe- 
cial prefix such as WS2JRA/2 
count for WS2; however, 
WS2JRA/3 would count for W3, 

Ail calls without numbers will 
be assigned an arbitrary Q plus 
the first two letters to constitute 
a prefix. For example, RAEM 
counts as RAO, AIR as Alfi, 
UPOL is UPO. All portable suf- 
fixes that contain no numerals 
will be assigned an arbitrary Q. 



For 0xainp)ev W4BPD/LX counts 
as LXO and WA60GW/PX counts 
as PX<I. 

THE VPX AWARD 

The VPX, or verified preftxes 
award, can be earned by short- 
wave listeners (SWLs) who pos- 
sess QSL cards confirming re* 
ception of at feast 300 different 
amateur prefixes. No mode 
endorsements are available. 
Applications are submitted to 
the WPX Award Manager In ac- 
cordance with the WPX rules. 

THE WPNX 

The WPNX award can be 
earned by USA Novices who 
work 100 different prefixes prior 
to receiving a higher-cfass 
license. The application may be 
submitted after receiving the 
higher license, providing the ac- 
tual contacts were made as a 
Novice. Prefixes worked for the 
WPNX award may later be used 
for credit toward the WPX 
award. 

The rules for the WPNX award 
are the same as for WPX, except 
that only 100 prefixes must be 
confirmed and that applications 
are sent to the WPX Award 
Manager. 

THE CO DX AWARD 

The CQ CW DX award and CQ 
SSB DX award are issued to any 
amateur station submitting 
proof of contact with 100 or 
more countries on CW, or SSB. 
Applications should be submit- 
ted on the official CO DX award 
application. 

AJl QSOs must be 2- way SSB 
or 2-way CW — crossmode or 
one^way QSOs are not valid for 
the CO DX awards. QSLs must 
be ifsted in alphabetical order by 
prefix and all QSOs must be 
dated after November 15, 1945. 
Except for the mobile endorse* 
ment, all QSOs must be made 
from the same call area. 

QSL cards must be verified by 
one of the authorized check- 
points for CQ OX awards or 
must be included with the appii- 
cation. If cards are sent directly 
to the Award Manager, Billy 
Williams N4UF, 911 Rto SL 
Johns Dr.. Jacksonvrlle FL 
32211. postage for their return 
by first-class mail must be in- 
cluded. If certified or registered 
mail return is desired, sufficient 
postage should be included. 

Country endorsements for 
150. 200. 250, 275, 300, 310, and 
320 countries will be issued. To 
promote multiband usage and 



special operating skills, special 
endorsements are available as 
follows: 

• a 2&'MHz band endorsement 
for the 100 or more countries 
confirmed on the 28-MHz band; 

• a 3.5/7-MHz band en- 
dorsement for too or morecoun- 
tries confirmed using any com* 
bination of the 3.5- and 7-MHz 
bands- 

• a I.S-MHz band endorsement 
for 50 or more countries con- 
firmed on the 1.8-MH2 band; 

• a QRPp endorsement for 50 or 
more countries confirmed using 
5 Watts input or less; 

• a mobile endorsement for 50 
or more countries confirmed 
while operating mobile. The call 
area requirement is waived tor 
this endorsement; 

• an SSTV endorsement {CQ 
SSB DX award onfy) for 50 or 
more countries confirmed using 
2-way slow'Scan TV; 

• an OSCAR endorsement for 
50 countries confirmed via am- 
ateur satellite, 

A fee of $4.00 for subscribers 
and $10.00 for non-subscribers 
{or the equivalent in IRCs), to de* 
fray the cost of the certificate 
and handling, is required for 
each award. An SASE or one IRC 
Is required for each en- 
dorsement. 

The ARRL DXCC country list 
constitutes the basis for CO DX 
award country status. Deleted 
countries will not be valid for the 
CO DX award. Once a country 
has lost its status as a current 
country, It will automatically be 
deleted from our records. 

All contacts must be with 
tfcensed land-based amateur 
stations working in authorized 
amateur bands, Contacts with 
ships and aircraft cannot be 
counted, 

USA-CA AWARD PROGRAM 

The United States of America 
Counties award, sponsored by 
CQ, fs issued for confirmed con- 
tacts with specified numbers of 
US counties under rules and 
conditions hereafter stated. 

The USA-CA is issued for 
seven (?) different classes, each 
a separate achievement as en- 
dorsed on the basic certificate 
by the use of a special seal for 
each higher cfass. Also, special 
endorsements will be made for 
all-one-band or -mode opera- 
tions subject to the rutes. 

Ctass USA'500 requires 500 
counties, USA-1000 requires 
tOOO counties and 25 States, 
USA'1500 requires 1500 coun- 



ties and 45 slates. USA-2000 re- 
quires 2000 counties and 50 
states, USA-2500 requires 2500 
counties and 50 states, 
USA'3000 requires 3000 coun- 
ties and 50 states, and the ulti- 
mate award, USA-3074-CA, is is- 
sued for all 3074 counties in all 
50 states. The USA-3074 award- 
ee is given a special honors 
plaque for a cost of $35. 

USA-CA is available to a!T li- 
censed amateurs everywhere in 
the world and is issued to them 
as Individuals for all county con- 
tacts made, regardless of calls 
held, operating QTHs, or dates 
whatever. Special USA-CAs are 
also available to SWLs on a 
heard basis. 

All contacts must be con- 
firmed by QSL and such QSLs 
must be in one's possession for 
identification by certification of- 
ficials. Any QSL card found to 
be altered in any way disquali- 
fies the applicant. 

For mobile and portable oper- 
ations, the postmark will iden- 
tify the county unless informa- 
tion stated on QSL cards makes 
other positive identification. In 
the case of cities, parks, or 
reservations not within counties 
proper, applicants may claim 
any one of the adjoining coun- 
ties for credit (once). 

The USA-CA program will be 
administered by a CQ staff 
member acting as USA-CA cus- 
todian, and all applications and 
related cofrespondence should 
be sent directly to him at his 
QTH. Decisionsof the custodian 
In administering these rules and 
their interpretation (including 
future amendmentsj are final. 

The scope of USA-CA makes 

It mandatory that special record 
books t>e used for application. 
For this purpose, CO has pro- 
vided a 64-page. 4%*' by 11" 
record book which contams 
application and certification 
forms and which provides 
record/log space meeting the 
conditions of any class of award 
and/or endorsement required. 

A completed USA-CA record 
book constitutes the medium of 
basic application and becomes 
the property of CQ for record 
purposes. On subsequent appli- 
cations for either higher classes 
or for special endorsements, ap- 
plicants may use additional 
record books to list required 
data or may make up Iheir own 
alphabetical lists conforming to 
requirements. 

Record books can be ob* 
tained directly from CQ, 76 N 



Broadway, Hicksvilie NY 11801 
for $1,25 each. We recommend 
that two be obtained: one for 
application use and one for 
personal file copy. 

To apply, make the record 
book entries necessary for 
county identity and enter other 
log data necessary to satisfy 
any special endorsements 
(band/mode) requested. 

Be sure to have the certlfJca- 
tion form provided signed by 
two licensed amateurs (General 
class or higher) or an of ficiaf of a 
nalional-level radio organization 
or affiliated club, verifying that 
QSL cards for all contacts as 
listed have been seen. The USA- 
CA custodian reserves the right 
to request any specific cards to 
satisfy any doubt whatever, in 
such cases, applicants should 
send sufficient postage for re- 
turn of cards by registered malL 

Send the original completed 
record book {not a copy), cer* 
tiflcation forms and handling 
fee. The fee for non-subscribers 
to CQ is $10.00 or 40 IRCs; for 
subscribers, the fee is $4.00 or 
12 IRCs. CQ subscribers should 
include a recent mailing label 
with their application (or copy). 
Send to USA-CA Custodian. Ed 
Hopper W2GT, Box 73, Rochelle 
Park NJ 07662. For later applica- 
tions for higher class seals, 
send the record book or a self* 
prepared list (per rules) and 
$1.25 or 6 IRCs (handling 
charge). For application for later 
special endorsements (band 
mode) for which certificates 
must be returned for endorse- 
ment, send certificates and 
$1.50 or 8 IRCs for handling 
charges. Note: At the time any 
USA-CA award certificate is be- 
ing processed, there are no 
charges Other than the basic 
fee, regardless of the number of 
endorsements or seals; like- 
wise, one may skip the lower 
classes of USA-CA and get 
higher classes without losing 
any lower awards credits or pay- 
ing any fee for them. 



SALf^QNA-RAMA 

The Racine Megacycle Club 
will be operating W9UDU, a spe- 
cial event station, during 
SALMON-A-RAMA from July 
10th through July 18th< 1982. Op- 
erating dates and times: July 10, 
11, and 17— 1100Z-2300Z; July 
18— 1100Z-2000Z. Frequency: 
Fish locators have identtfied 
good fishing grounds in the 
General portion of the phone 

TSMagazme • July, 1982 129 



bands on 10» 15, and 20 meters. 
Go fishing for W9UDU and re- 
ceive a special QSL for an SASE 
to: W9UDU Racine Megacycle 
Club, do American Red Cross— 
Lakeshore Counties. 4521 Tay- 
lor Avenue, Racine WI 53405, 

For more infomnation» con- 
tact David Voss WB9US1, Presi- 
dent. Racine Megacycle Club, 
3333 Stand Ish Lane, Racine Wl 
53405. 

WAPAKONETA OH 

The Reservoir Amateur Radio 
Association will operate K8QYL 
from 1300Z July 1 7 to OAOOZ July 
18 and again from 1300Z to 
1900Z, July 18, from the birth- 
place of Neil Armstrong, the 
first man on the moon. Frequen* 
cles: phone— 3940, 7260, 14285, 
21360. and 28590, plus or minus 
QRM; CW^SO kHz up from the 



bottom of the band at the begin- 
ning of the odd hours. Check^ns 
invited on K8QYUR (147.93/ 
147.33). Gertrficate for QSL and 
SASE to: KBQYL, PO Box 268. 
Ceima OH 45Q22. 

TOM SAWYER DAYS 

The Hannibal Amateur Radio 
Club, fnc, will issue a second 
annual special certificate from 
the National Tom Sawyer Days 
celebration in f^ark Twain's boy- 
hood home town, Hannibal Mis- 
souri, on July 3-4, 1982. Hours: 
1500-2100 LTTC both days. Fre- 
quencies: phone— 7,245, 14,290, 
21.400, and 28.700; CW— 7.125 
and 21.125 MHz. The club will 
also be observing our 50th anni- 
versary. Help us celebrate! To 
receive the certificate, send a 
large <8''x10'') SASE and your 
personal QSL card confirming 



the contact to the Hannibal 
Amateur Radio Club, Inc., 
W0KEM, 2108 Orchard Avenoe, 
Hannibal MO 63401. 

BONFIELDIL 

Commemorative amateur ra- 
dio station K9JLK will be operat- 
ing from the Bonfield. Illinois 
centennial celebration from 
1300Z, July 4, 1932, through July 
5. Operating frequencies will be 

223.50, 144.250 (SSB), 146.520 
(FM), 50.115. 28.600. 21.400, 
14.325, 7.275, and 3J-3.9, For 
QSL, send an SASE to Jerry 
Whalen WB9WOC, RR2, Kanka- 
kee I L 60901. 

WINONA MN 

The Winona (MN) ARC will op- 
erate WBONIU on July 3 to com- 
memorate the 125th anniversary 
of the signing of the charter of 



the city of Winona. Winona is a 
river town in SE MN. The station 
will operate from 15002 to 2100Z 
on 7.245. 14.290. 21.305, and 
28,650 MHz. A special QSL for 
working this station will be avail- 
able by SASE to Erik W, Brom 
WBONIU, ^55 6lh St., Winona, 
MN 55987* Other area stations 
will also be using these cards. 

CELINA OH 

The Reservoir Amateur Radio 
Association will operate W8DN 
from 1300Z to 1800Z, July 24, 
from the courthouse lawn dur- 
ing the Celina Lake Festival 
Frequencies: phone— 3940, 
7260, 14285, 21360, 28590, p]us 
or minus QRM, Checknns are In- 
vited on WBBFNB/R on 146.01/ 
146.61. Certificate for QSL and 
SASE to W8DN, PO Box 268, Ce- 
lina OH 45822, 



LETTERS 



KB7NW A WINNER 



I would like you to know that 
the article "Pacific Odyssey" by 
KB7NW was one of the best 1 
have read in a long time. I 
thought the way it was orga- 
nized and presented was top- 
notch, as was the use of photo- 
graphs to supplement the excel- 
lent story line. I could almost 
feel I was there! 

If you give awards for well- 
presented articies, J.D. Bmders' 
^'Pacific Odyssey" to Kingman 
and Palmyra sure get my vote I 

This article is a credit to your 
magazine. 

Homer La sitter W6QX 
La Jolla CA 

We're gfad you flked *'Pacffic Od- 
yssey/' Homer. And thanks for 
wrtUng. Not only wHl the author 
enjoy your comments, the 73 
StBft appreciates the feedback. 
We encourage readers to let us 
know when they particutarty like 
(or distfke) something in 73* — 
N8RK. 



NO NUKES— r 



] 



I am a firm believer in our First 
Amendment rights, but I take Is- 
sue with the basic premise of 
the May, 73, article, "Surviving 
the Unthinkable." Yes, I agree 

130 73 Magazine • July; 1982 



that hams have a responsibility 
!o be prepared for emergencies, 
but nuciear war IS unthinkable. 
There would be NO survivors. 
Preparing for a nuciear holo* 
caust assumes there must be 
one, and that attitude |ust might 
help it happen. Hams should not 
give in—we must fight for our 
right to a life of peace. 

David Stoft WD6DXX 
Spokane WA 



NO NUKES— II 



I am upset by the "Surviving 
the Unthinkable" article in your 
May. 1982, issue, for several rea- 
sons. A sense of practicatity 
plus the firm grasp on Murphy*s 
Law which most amateurs have 
should reveal the weaknesses 
of the FEMA claims for how we 
shall evacuate. Missiles take on- 
ly 30 minutes to arrive, and it will 
take far longer for all those in 
target areas to depart. To hope 
for any better circumstances is 
to hope that one^s new antenna 
installation is going to go in 
without a hitch. Wishful thinking 
will not hack It. 

True, amateurs can help in al- 
most any emergency, but I feel 
that all amateurs should be 
burning the airwaves now to try 
to talk to anyone anywhere on 
the planet to forward the goal of 
preventing ''the unthinkable/' 



To cheerfully accept ten million 
deaths is insanity, no matter 
what the format! 

I sense that this is another 
"Gee. gosh, we can be so help- 
ful*' article. I do not want to be in 
the position of trying to provide 
emergency service to what 
would be left, I would rather 
work now at some other solution 
to the problem than gel first- 
hand experience on how Murphy 
would operate with nuclear 
weapons as tools of his "what- 
ever can go wrong, wlH" policy. 

Amateurs have a unique abili- 
ty to speak to peoples of other 
countries. Let's use that ability 
to forward efforts to prevent a 
nuclear conflict, rather than be- 
come another vulture watching 
over a possibly dying America 
as a part of this government's 
new Civil Defense push, 

David Gibbons 
Carmichael CA 



BASH REHASH 



1 



Concerning the ongoing Dick 
Bash story, l*d like to add anoth* 
er log to the fire. 

W hen's the last time you sat 
back in your favorite chair with a 
copy of QSTs Q & A manual? 
Unless you're sitting on a bed of 
nails with five kids screaming 
around you and the TV set too 
loud, within a few minutes after 
opening the front cover, you'll 
be checking the insides of your 
eyelids for holes. In short, it's 
more boring than a monotonous 
voice telling you last week's 
news. 



The questions In that vener- 
able manual are not quite the 
same as found on the FCC tests, 
but then again, if you look close- 
ly, they're not all that much dif- 
ferent, either. The tricky part is 
trying to wade through what is 
termed an answer without hav- 
ing to reread it many times. By 
then, your attention and pa* 
tience are wearing thin. After a 
few pages of this you begin to 
wonder if it's worth it. Those of 
stout heart and strong desire 
may make it just a bit further, 
but eventually the book is 
closed and gathers dust. The 
Ameco Study Guide Is not quite 
as bad as it lays out the explana- 
tion without so much fairy dust 
sprinkled on it. If you haven*t 
had the time to look over one of 
Dick Bash's books, he does give 
the test question and the test 
answer, but It doesn't just stop 
there. It explains why that is the 
correct answer and does it with 
enough literary flair to kaep your 
interest to the point of making a 
more lasting impression. 

For several years in the Army. 
1 taught basic electricity and air- 
craft electrical systems to ser- 
vicemen who not only didn't 
want to t>e there, but some of 
them shouldn't have even been 
there to begin with. Vietnam 
caused some barrel scraping 
near the end. How do you teach 
people like that? You create an 
atmosphere or situation that 
captures their interest. It wasn't 
easy and most Instructors didn't 
even try, but when you succeed* 
ed you knew it and the students 



knew it, too. I was also partly re- 
sponsible tor writing tests and 
lesson plans. My approach was 
somewhat similar to Dick*s al- 
though greatly restricted due to 
bureaocratic regimentation. 

Have you ever met Dick Bash? 
He's outgoing and congenial 
but a bit of a maverick, like most 
people who create or lead. He 
saw a weakness in the self ^tu- 
torial method of teaching a com- 
plex subject that was sorely 
lacking in Instructional material 
that filtered out the black boxes, 
witches, and demons. There are 
those in this world who consldef 
electronics as **black magic** 
and some of them are hams. Ba- 
sic electricity, if taught properly, 
can be interesting ^mS informa- 
' live. If college courses are of- 
fered for electronics, how does 
the average person expect to 
learn it without some help? 

Letters to editors are strange 
things. This Is my first and prob- 
ably last one. Every subscrrber 
gets to read the editorial— 
which is really only one mark's 
opinion— and the mass is left to 
draw Its own conclusions but 
based only on the editorialized 
facts. The editor may consider it 
his prerogative to tell it the way 
he sees it, and who's to dispute 
it? I feet you were wrong to so ve- 
hemently condemn Dick Bash 
as you did and not gtve everyone 
the facts of what the book Is 
really like- I've met Bash class 
gfaduates and find them no dif- 
ferent from hams I met 10 or 15 
years ago. We need to increase 
and strengthen our numbers 
and I don't feel one bit like 
we're compromising ourselves 
with Dick's books, 

I can almost understand QST 
not wanting to run his ads. After 
all, a "non profit'* organization 
In the publishing business with 
a corner on most of the 'Instruc- 
tional material*' has to protect 
its own interests. Doesn*t it? 
What all thrs boils down to Is 
this: Whether you consider the 
Dick Bash books unethical or 
not, they get the job done of in- 
forming and teaching. Even my 
wife learned enough to evoke a 
response of, "So that's how it 
works 1" I'm not going to fault 
Dick's system one bit because it 
works. What I do fault is your re- 
marks of *'poison" and '*being 
insidious'' without ever telling 
what the books are like and let- 
ting people draw their own con- 
clusions* I would expect that of 



a rag like the Nationaf Enquirer, 
but not from 73 Magazine. 

Fred Palmer WA5WZD 
Corinth TX 

Have I met Bash? Heck, Dick 

worked for us here for a whiie. 
He drove us crazy end we gave 
up trying to harness him. We 
parted good friends and i think 
stay that way. Dick knows what I 
think of his '^system" and why. 
The Bash approach does give 
some slight attention to expla- 
nations, but the brunt of his 
books is to present, word for 
word, the questions you are go- 
ing to face. . .and their an- 
swers. The one-day in tens Ives 
are designed to fiii your short- 
term memory with the questions 
and answers, not long-term real 
understanding of eiecfronics 
and radio. If you are unable to 
take the FCC test the next day 
after en intensive by Bash, you 
can be in deep trouble. 

One of the more serious di- 
sasters of our whole education- 
al process has to do with the 
continued use of short-term 
memory for the passing of tests 
instead of getting the informa- 
tion into the long-term memory. 
This is why so many students 
have little recollection of a 
course once they have passed it 
This was my major gripe with 
cot lege, where the emphasis 
was on read-and-take-a-quiz, 
with little effort to discuss the 
material and thus give it a 
chance to be understood and 
filed away in more permanent 
memory. 

The Navy, on the other hand, 
had a fantastic course In Bfec- 
tronics, where they taught theo- 
ry and then immediately took 
you into a lab to work with that 
theory and thus grow to reatfy 
understand it. In classes, we dis- 
cussed the theory until we were 
able to think in electronic terms. 
If I'm able to get a college start- 
ed, it is going to teach the stu- 
dents to think, not memorize. 
They are going to learn about 
electronics and then work with 
It, They wilt learn about commu- 
nications and then learn to de- 
sign, build, and servicB equip- 
ments They wilt learn computer 
design. . . and repairs. They will 
learn to write programs and fix 
'em. 

ft may be that amateur radio 
has so fallen apart under the 
pressures to let in one more 
friend or wife that it no longer is 
even considered important for 
hams to understand radio. If so. 



we should formally agree with 
this and throw away our charter, 
section 97, and put amateur 
radio and CB together into one 
service, being honest about our 
motives. 

Fred, when I suggest that 
hams get mad about this and 
rush to their neighborhood ham 
store and rip Bash's cheat 
books to shredSt I know. ..as do 
you, if you think about it instead 
of reacting. . .that what will 
happen is a rush to buy these 
short cuts to getting a ticket. 
They do work. It is now possible 
to get a ham ticket without real- 
ly knowing a damned thing 
about electronics or radio. Peo- 
ple with a knack for the code can 
learn it enough to pass the test 
in about one hour. That*s how 
long it took me to get to 5^wpm 
solid copy right from not know- 
ing a single character. 

If it's easy ham tickets you 
want, Fred, you've got *em now. 
But I don't see that bringing in 
many hams. Hell, we can^t even 
give ham tickets away these 
days. Now, 1 may be wrong 
about wanting hams to clean up 
the act. . . to get our clubs to 
start teaching the fundamentals 
of theory and making sure that 
newcomers qualify. Most of my 
mail says t have a lot of hams 
backing me, but there are oppo- 
nents such as you. 

Perhaps we are still being too 
strict in our tests. One could 
certainly make a case for the 
amateur tests being biased so 
that they exclude blacks, wom- 
en, Chinese, Latin-Americans, 
and other such groups. Per- 
haps it is time for a move to- 
ward affirmative action and an 
open-door policy for these un- 
der*represented groups. 
Should we start seeing how 
simple we can make the proce- 
dure in order to give these mi- 
norities (and the female major* 
ity) their ''rights'*?— Wayne. 

NOMISTEAKHERE 

This letter is In reference to 
FCC spokesman Vernon 
Wilson's denial of misspellings 
on FCC code tapes (page 121, 
T3, May, 1982). 

Over the last few years 1 have 
taken one General class test 
and two Extra class tests (one 
failed because of nerves and 
pressures and one passed with 
100% a month later). I found 
these tests to be difficult. How- 
ever, there were no misspelled 
words, irregularities, or even 



sneaky tricks. I even had Spring- 
field on one {spelled correctly). 
Interest^gly, one fellow told me 
after the test that he had copied 
Springvale; another had copied 
Sprjngdale, 

Under the extreme pressure 
we hams generate within our- 
selves at test time, I believe It is 
quite possible to sincerely, but 
incorrectly, copy '^mistakes** 
that simply are not there. 

Lincoln Thorner KS2H 
New York NY 

KS2H's letter is like several oth- 
ers we have received. No one 
has come forward with docu- 
mented evidence of a misspell- 
ing on the FCC code exams.— 
N8RK. 

BRAINS NOT FISTS 

I have here in front of me the 
March issue of 73 Magazine^ but 
what I want to talk about is not 
how much I like it but your stand 
concerning the requirement for 
the Morse-code test. 

There should be no question 
but that in this day and age of 
space exploration and digital 
electronics, this requirement is 
pathetically antiquated and 
comparable to requiring Grey- 
hound drivers to know how to 
handle a Conestoga wagon, it 
senses no purpose other than to 
keep away from amateur radio 
technically competent people 
who have neither the patience 
nor the time to waste in learning 
a skill that has no place in state- 
of-the-art electronics. 

All of the surveys that showed 
"overwhelming opposition" to a 
no-code license have been per- 
formed with no objectivity and a 
lot of bias in a group of individu- 
als who had a vested Interest in 
the outcome. Nobody should be 
a part of, or a judge in, a contest 
of any kind who thinks: "What? 
A no-code license? Over my 
dead body! Let them sweat it 
out as I did!" You don't have (o 
be endowed with divinatory 
powers to know beforehand the 
outcome of such a survey. In 
other words, newcomers not 
welcomef 

Keep up the good work and be 
sure that once again we will see 
in the future who was right- 
What we need today is brain, not 
fistf Your suggestion to use 
technical knowledge as a filter, 
instead of Morse-code skill, 
does make a lot of sense. 

Oh, by the way, let me tell you 
that I am not a frustrated would- 

IBhAagazine • July. 1982 131 



be ham who flunked the code 
test. Many years ago, more than 
I care to remember, t had to get a 
commercial second-cFass radio 
operator's license (including 
Morse at 20 wpm). and to this 
day I fail to see what good can 
come to amateur radio by turn- 
ing the code skilt into a tetish. 

It is about time that some 
common sense is written into 
these regulations. 

Paulo G. Lefevf© 

PY1AQUCT1EM 

CarcaveloSp Portugal 

0/e — Wayne. 

HORSERADISH DISPLAY 

I've been fascinated by QSL 
cards sfnce I was an SWL in the 
early 1950s* A QSL is a special 
thing—representative of the fn- 
dividual, locale, and country of 
origin. 1 am quite aware of the 
expense involved, be it the sim- 
plest '^Quick Print Shop" shot of 
a hand drawing or the elat>orate 
five-run or color photographic 
rendition. 

The thing that moved me to 
write this letter is the volume of 
cards seen since become a DX 
QSL manager (CESSYY), Gentle* 
men— the ladies are now left 
out, they do it right— the blotter 
pape? and repetitiously inane 
renderings passing this way 
don't even rate a shoe box as a 
repository. As a person driving 
up In an unwashed, beat^up au- 
tomobile makes a lasting first 
impression, so do your cards. 

It pains me to see that cards 
from the South Pacific that ten 
short years ago had swallowtail 
butterflies, birds of paradise, 
and outrigger canoes now look 
like the cards of members of the 
Southern California DX Club. 
How many cards can a person 
with DXCG> WAZ, and God- 
knows-what-all possibly send? 
Economy seems to rule, how- 
ever, and I would offer the fol- 
lowing comments, 

1 Lack of return postage is a 
paramount issue as it makes the 
card expense critical. 

2. The card's free, the freight 
a\r\X 

3, If you care and really have 
had at least one original thought 
in your life, consider the fact 
your card represents you, so do 
it cute, professionally, or at 
least in good taste and design. 

If you're tired of seeing your 
country QSL display looking like 
horseradish and mustard, the 
solution really rests with you 

132 73 Magazine • JutyJ982 



and the merchants of medlocrU 
ty who simplify the continuation 
of the problem. The DX is realiy 
waiting for you to get your act 
together. 

Terry F.Staudt W«WUZ 
Evergreen CO 

Readers who don't like horse- 
radish are encouraged to submit 
B QSL card to 73 's monthly con- 
test You will find detaifs with 
this month's winner — N8RK. 

DX FOB THE BLIND 

Two years after losing my 
Sight from detached retinas, I 
obtained my Novice class li- 
cense. Six months later, I 
achieved General class status 
and have been a DXer ever 
since. Two common problems 
for the bHnd DXer are the inabili* 
ty to obtain current DX informa- 
tion and the difficulty of filling 
out DX cards. 

I am writing this letter to in- 
form blind DXers of a new and 
exciting service. The Braille DX 
Service provides: (T) a monthly 
cassette recording of current DX 
activity and expeditions, as well 
as important QSL information, 
and featuring the Kansas DX As- 
sociation monthly newsletter, 
(2) a current DXCC countries list 
in Braille or on cassette tape, In- 
cluding regular up-to-date prefix 
changes, and {3) a personal QSL 
manager for outgoing cards. 
Volunteers fill out the blind DX- 
er's QSL cards, and log informa- 
tion is passed, either by on-the- 
air schedules or simply by mail- 
ing the information direct to the 
volunteer. Log information can 
be recorded on cassette tape 
and mailed to the volunteer. 

Membership is simply a one- 
time $2.00 donation to help pur- 
chase blank cassette tapes for 
the monthly newsletter* The 
Kansas DX Association has 
demonstrated their interest in 
this program by providing a cas* 
sette recording of the monthly 
newsletter and volunteer QSL 
managers for the blind DXer. 

Phil Scovell AFiH 
Lakewood CO 



3 CHEERS FOR MFJ 



blew a small coil In the swr 
bridge circuit. I called them on 
their WATS line, and it was not 
until later that I read down the 
page a bit and saw that I had 
called the sales number and not 
the parts and service depart- 
ment. A very pleasant YL an^ 
swered and, not understanding 
what I wanted to order, she con* 
nected me to an OM by the name 
of Stan. I explained to Stan that I 
had blown the coil, that the unit 
was out of warranty, and that I 
wanted to order another Well, a 
strange thing happened for 
these times, as Stan refused to 
sell me the coil; instead^ he in- 
sisted that I give him my name 
and address and he would get 

one out to me in the mail at 

no chargel Now that is what I 
call darn good business PR. 

It was not so much the cost 
(or in this case, non-cost) as It 
was the pleasant manner In 
which this was handled, and I 
woutd appreciate it if you would 
let your readers know about one 
of the "good guys'*— MFJ Enter* 
prises of Mississippi State, Mis- 
sissippi. 

Don WllTTams 5n, Publisher 

B8 Micro Journat 

Hixson TN 



HAM PEACE CORPS 



I want you to know about an 
experience I had with one of 
your advertisers. Two years ago 
at the Atlanta Ham test I pur- 
chased an MFj-962 antenna 
tuner. Well, as you might know, I 
probably loaded it wrong and 



In your 73 issue of November, 
1981, I saw your editorial about 
South Africa and would like to 
record my disapproval of your 
visit to the Republic of South Af^ 
rica. 

South Africa is the only re- 
maining country which violates 
human rights on the basis of 
race (skin pigmentation). This vi- 
olation Is perpetual and cannot 
be transcended (tiecause you 
cannot change your color) and 
is grossly unfair to its people 
and the people of the world (l>e* 
cause such ideas might spread 
out of South Africa to the rest of 
the world again). Therefore, it is 
necessary to fight such an un- 
fair system by all means, includ- 
ing withholding technology, 
sports contacts, amateur radio 
contacts, etc. 

Why? Because the racist mi- 
nority in power (which does not 
Include at t South African whites) 
can use such technology to op- 
press the majority and interna- 
tional sports and cultural con- 
tacts to win international ac- 
ceptance and legitimacy. Build- 
ing up communication technol- 



ogy through amateur radio is 
one such example— communi- 
cation technology can be used 
to spread ideas of apartheid and 
for police and military purposes. 

You might say, sure» South Af- 
rica violates human rights, but 
what al>out other dictatorial re- 
gimes in Africa/South America/ 
Asia? There, oppression Is 
through ideology (tTOlief sys- 
tems} or money (class back- 
ground of a person), etc., and 
boycott action agamst them is 
valid and is practiced, e.g., 
against Chile, Poland, etc. The 
only similar case Is the caste 
system^ as It is practiced in the 
feudal and backward areas of 
India— where you are born Into a 
caste and are discriminated 
against. 

As a citizen of a multi-racial 
democracy (the same as in your 
case) where people of various 
races (Caucasian, Mongolian^ 
and Negroid) live in harmony, 
settle, and marry across regions 
and are guaranteed the same 
constitutional rights, I think it is 
our duty to discourage contacts 
with South Africa. 

Right now, the Republic of 
South Africa is involved in a PR 
campaign (albeit the organiza- 
tion of such a campaign may 
well be loose) and is trying to get 
scientists, scholars, and sports- 
men to visit them (e.g., UK crick- 
et players, Taiwanese scholars, 
etc.). Clever as they are, they 
sent Dr, Christian Barnard (the 
famous heart surgeon and a be- 
liever in racism) to India, know- 
ing that he would be the feast 
objectionable here. 

f respect 73 for its boldness 
(in criticism of regulatory 
bodies), its presentation (which 
is lucid and interesting), and its 
keeping abreast of new technol- 
ogy, and this is the very first 
time I feel the urge to express 
my disapproval, I hope that you 
will take it in a constructive spir- 
it and respond to my arguments. 

Gopal Kamat VU2JE 
Bombay, India 

Well, Kamat, just in case there 
are some readers who agree 
with your thinking, it might be 
prudent to answer your criti- 
cisms. Let*s go back a few years 
to the time when the US was in- 
volved with Vietnam. Recaffwith 
me, if you wifl, that my country 
was being severely criticized by 
much of the wor/d f^Aany people 
were busy not visiting the US be- 



cause it was mvoived in that un* 

popular w^r. 

Possibty, Kamat, you were 
not a reader of 73 during those 
years, if you had been you would 
know that there were a number 
of Americans who were not in fa- 
vor of the war. Some reacted by 
being compfetely negative 
about it.. Just get out and 
ieave 'em atone. Others recog- 
nized the problems involved, but 
felt that there was more than 
one way to respond. Indeed, I 
made a trip around the world 
and talked with hams in many 
countries about the situation. 
As a result, I deveioped a plan 
which t felt was far better than 
fighting. / distilled the ideas / ran 
into in Yugoslavia, Thailand, 
Singapore, and New Caledonia 
as t talked with hams in these 
countries. 

My plan seemed relatively 
simple, workable, and most like- 
ly to result in avoiding further 
bloodshed. I am convinced that 
if the US had followed It that a 
unified Vietnam would be free of 
communism. . .as would Laos 
and Cambodia, I wrote of my 
plan in 73 and got hundreds of 
tetters supporting it. I also sent 
it to Congress, but as far as i 
know not one copy ever got 
through the assistants, t failed 
* « . tut at least I tried. 

Now, about South Africa^ 
Sure, many people are at odds 
with the South African govern- 
ment. But does that mean that 
we have to hate South Africans? 
What possible benefit is that to 
anyone? i went to South Africa 
to visit the hams and computer 
fanatics, not the government. 
Asa matter of fact, I don't think I 
met anyone from the govern- 
ments 

The people that I did meet and 
talk with are as helpless about 
the policies of their government 
as t was about mine. They, sad- 



fy, have far less freedom to 
speak up in criticism. , .but 
then there are very few coun- 
tries which are as permissive as 
the US. And rememtier, please, 
that there are some government 
agenciBS in the US which will 
not permit open criticism. Our 
country is good in many ways, 
but it is far from free as yet. 

May I contrast your negative 

attitude with my positive one. 
You advocate not visiting coun- 
tries of which you disapprove. I 
advocate visiting them and ad* 
vocating changes to them which 
will improve the situation. In- 
deed, white t was in South Africa 
I went on television during prime 
time and said flat out that it was 
time for them to consider mak- 
ing some moves to change their 
basic policies. I am told that 
over a million blacks and whites 
saw my broadcasts 

I th/nk I got their attention 
when I put it this way, . J ex- 
plained that there are about 59 
countries in Africa and that ap- 
proximately 56 of these hate 
South Africa. I suggested that 
perhaps it was time to start do- 
ing something to counter this 
. . . and I had a positive sugges- 
tiont not a negative one. 

As I pointed out, we are enter- 
ing an electronic age. Comput- 
ers and telecommunications are 
inseparable with the future. I 
also pointed out that unless 
South Africa did something. . . 
and quickly. . .the country 
would be passed by in technol- 
ogy. To keep up with the need 
for people to invent, build, oper- 
ate, and service the technology 
of the future, they are in need of 
tens of thousands of techni- 
cians and engineers. 

The only reasonable source of 
this many technical people will 
be for South Africa to make it a 
policy to introduce amateur 



radio and computer clubs in 

their high schools. They will 
have to get teenagers interested 
in technical careers. 

Okay. The next step is an obvi- 
ous one. . . the need for techni- 
cal colleges to bring these inter- 
ested teenagers up to the state- 
of-the-art in electronics, com- 
munications, and computers. 
This can be done either the ex- 
pensive way.,. by the govern- 
ment paying for it. ..or it can be 
done by getting private industry 
to pick up most of the tab. I sug- 
gested they consider my plan 
for opening a college which is in- 
tegrated with several local elec- 
tronics businesses. In this way, 
the students would get the best 
of the formal technical educa- 
tion. . . and the practical profes- 
sional experience of working 
with a business firm. 

Further, I proposed that they 
include plenty of business 
courses so that the students 
would be well rounded in both 
technical matters and business, 
t suggested that they teach ad- 
vertising, writing, speaking, fi- 
nance, hiring, personnel man- 
agement, purchasing, and so 
on. 

The income from working 
with the on-campus firms would 
keep the end cost of the educa- 
tion low and within the reach of 
most middle-income families. 

Then, once this idea had sunk 
in, I proposed what my inter* 
viewer called the Electron ic 
Peace Corps. This was a plan to 
bring in worthy students from 
the other African counties for a 
free education in this new type 
of school. The cost would be low 
and the students, once they re- 
turned to their native countries, 
would soon rise to the top by vir- 
tue of their education and expe- 
rience. 

The people in the other Afri- 
can countries realize that they 



have no opportunity for a good 

education unless they leave 
their country. At present, the on- 
ly sources for a free education 
tie in Moscow and Havana. 
These are not very attractive ah 
ternatives. Further, the people in 
these countries realize that they 
are on a downward spiral, some- 
thing which only an infusion of 
educated people can change. 

The courses in South Africa 
would not, at first, be very popu- 
lar because of the hatred. But 
something as valuable as that 
for nothing might overcome all 
sorts of emotional blocks. South 
Africa would have to see that 
the black students were treated 
fairly and given the best of edu- 
cations. I think the floodgates 
would open and eager students 
would come in from all over Afri- 
ca. 

It will take a long time to 
change Africa,,. but isn't it 
time to get started? There are 
tremendous resources in Africa 
. , , with plenty of country for 
farms, millions of educabte peo- 
ple, and nowhere to go but up. 
Yes, there are tremendous ot>- 
stacles. Vve been there and seen 
them. I've talked about them 
with ham friends in many of the 
African countries, We're looking 
at several generations before 
things are really changed. 

But with educated entrepre- 
neurs in more and more African 
countries it could be possible to 
stop the destruction of these 
countries by their despot lead- 
ers and to start working for their 
eventual strength. 

Isn Y if better to visit a country 
and make a try at doing some- 
thing to help change things? 
The thousands of people who 
have not visited South Africa 
have done nothing. It may be 
that my voice has been com* 
pleteiy lost... but I did try.— 
Wayne, 



REVIEW 



ICOM 1C-4A 440*MHZ HT 

I recently purchased an Icom 
»C^A 440-MHz hand-held FM 
transceiver because I wanted to 
get on the FM portion of the 
3/4'meter band in the most cost- 
effective manner possible. I 
wanted to move up from the Mo- 
torola T-44, which lacks frequen- 



cy stability and Is quite large 
and heavy. ( believe that I made 
a very good decision and if you'll 
read on, I'll be glad to tell you 
why. 

First, I decided that my next 
rig would be new: With a unit 
straight from the factory, you 



get some kind of a warranty — at 
least saying that it will work 
right from the start. (Everything 
that 1 ever bought used always 
had something wrong with it.) 
Usually one faces a minor thing 
such as a noisy volume control 
or a worn-out switch. But if it is 
an intermittent problem that 
wants to be hard to trace down, 
may God help you! Also, when 
people sell their old gear they 
seem to want almost what they 
paid for it way bacl< when. This 
is good salesmanship, I sup- 
pose, but I'd rather spend the ex- 



tra bucks for state-of-tlw-art and 
a warranty. 

No Crystals 

Second, I decided that the rig 
would be synthesized. Activity 
on 440 is growing as more and 
more of the two-met er-FM 
crowd are getting one of the cur- 
rent crop of /O-cm FM hand-heid 
units (icom 1C-4A, Yaeso FT- 
708R, Tempo S-4, Sanlec ST- 
440/up). Therefore, more repeat- 
ers are bound to appear. 

Transmit and receive crystals 
of the high-accuracy (HA) vari- 

73 Magazine * July, 1982 133 



I 





Photo A. The iC-^A hand-held 44(hMHz FM transceiver. (Photo by 
Mtchaet D. Landis) 



ety go for just over thirteen dol- 
lars a copy (anything lass just 
doesn't make it). After a one- to 
!wo-weeK wail, the crystals ar- 
rive, and after mstalling them In 
the radio, you get to adjust 
those tiny trimmer capacitors 
until you are exactly on frequen- 
cy. Also, the price of twenty 
crystals, as an example (ten for 
transmit and ten for receive), 
times thirteen dollars each 
comes to $260, which is about 
what I paid for my IC-4A. 

The IC-4A offers 2000 possi- 
ble channels—the top 10 MHz of 
the 420*tO'450-MHz band, in 
S-kHz steps, Ttie thumbwheel 
switches select the frequency in 
1-MHz, 100-kHz, and 10-kHz 
steps, with the 5-kHz select 
switch just to the right of the 
thumbwheet switches. (The 
switch at the extreme right rs 
not used by Icom — it is there for 
you to wire up a switchable tone 
encoder.) 

The antenna connector Is a 
BNC type, and below it are exter- 
nal microphone and speaker 
jacks. To the right of the anten- 
na connector is an LED which 
lights during transmit, it afso 
serves as a battery indicator; if it 
goes out while you are squeez- 
ing the push-to-talk switch on 
the left side of the radio* your 
battery has just died. (You can, 

134 73 Magazine • July. 1982 



as soon as you notice the LED 
go out, immediately unkey, then 
key up again and say rapidiy, 
*This is [your callsign)— clear,** 
If this makes you feel better. You 
may even get through. If not^ the 
next person In line will probably 
sign you out,) 

On the back of the radio are 
three slide switches. The rf 
power switch, which is the top 
one, seiects between ,1& Watts 
out in the low position and 1.5 
Watts out in the high position. In 
the iow-power position, you 
draw only 43% of the current 
that you do In the high position, 
so you can transmit at>out twice 
as long. But remember that 
youVe putting out onfy one- 
tenth the power. I do not con- 
sider this to be a good enough 
trade to warrant the use of the 
low-power position unless i am 
within spitting range of a 
repeater. 

Below the power-select 
switch is a duplex/simplex se- 
lect switch, and below that Is a 
+ 5-MHz/ -5-MHz transmit off- 
set switch. Don't ask me why 
Icom does not use a single 
three-position switch that has 5 
down, simplex, and 5 up on It. 
My IC-4A does not have an out- 
of-band transmit-rnhibit circuit 
in it since the NT will transmit 




Photo 8, T"^e regulator circuit in the BP^ case. (Photo by Michael D. 
Landis} 



from 435.000 MHz to 454.995 

MHz when in the duplex mode. 

The microphone is located on 
the front of the radio case to the 
t>ottom right of the speaker, just 
above the word ^'microphone" 
that is molded onto the case. I 
was so used to those CB*type 
hand-helds where the speaker is 
used as the microphone !hat it 
took me a while to realize that t 
was directing my voice into the 
wrong place. Talk Into the lower- 
right corner of the speaker 
where there is a little rectangu- 
lar slot cut Into the case, and 
you will get full audio quality! 

The unit comes in a grey plas- 
tic case, ^acks the bells and 
whistles that inhabit the fronts 
of other brands of HTs. and 
doesn't have as much shiny 
metaL To me, it looks more like a 
policeman's NT than a ham's 
playtoy. 



Along with the radio you get 
the rubberked flexible antenna, 
a BP-3 battery pack and a wall 
charger for it, a metal belt clip 
and two screws with which to at- 
tach it to the radio, a hand strap 
(which I never use), an earphone 
(which I never use), and one 
each submini plug and mint plug 
for the external mike and speak- 
er jacks. You also gel an instruc- 
tion manual whicii gives a good 
general idea of what is going on, 
and two separate sheets which 
are quite detailed schematic 
and circuit board layouts. The 
size and appearance of the rig is 
identical to the IC-^aA/AT, and ex- 
cept fof antennas, they use the 
same accessories. 

The radio will not scan unless 
you want to wear ou! your fin- 
gers on the thumbwheel switch- 
es, so you must own a program- 
mable scanner or know the fre- 
quencies you will be using. Oth* 
erwise. you may r^eed to get one 



3 WCT 
FTECULATOR IC 



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Fig. 1. Regulator buitt into a BP-4 battery case. 




PiZZA PAN 
6R0UND PLANE 



SO- 239 
CONNECTOR 



Fig. 2. An improvised quarter-wave ground^pfane antenna. 



of the band-scanning rigs in* 
stead of this one. 

For some serious rag-chew* 
ing with this rig, you need either 
a basketful of batteries or an ac- 
operated power supply. 1 have 
built a regulator circuit into a 
BP-4 battery pacK case which al* 
lows me to use the car battery 
(via a cigarette lighter power 
adapter and a miniature plug} or 
my unregulated 13.8-V-dc power 
supply at home. The schematic 
for the regulator is shown in Fig. 
1. and Photo B is a close-up of 
the finished product, (if you 
don't like my way. you can look 
up WB3JJF's article in the Feb- 
ruary, 1981, issue of Ham 
Radio,} 

When l^m at home, i use an 
improvised quarter-wave ground^ 
plane antenna that works quite 
a bit better than the rubberized 
whip antenna. It consists of a 
pizza pan (for the ground plane) 
with a hole in the center to hold 
an Sa239 jack. (See Fig, 2.) I 
soidered a stiff copper wire to 
the top of the iack. A PL-259 plug 
with RG-58/U or RG-8/U cable Is 
screwed onto the connector, 
and the length of the copper 
wire whip is trimmed to one- 
quarter wavelength or for lowest 
standing-wave fatio at your 
favorite frequency. 

Unfortunately. I don^l have a 
lot of sophisticated test gear, 
but I can tell you that .3 micro- 
volts of signal will definitely 
quiet all the rushing noise in my 
receiver. The power with a fresh 
battery is somewhat higher than 
that stated in the manuai. and 
most amazing of ali (to me) is 
that all channels are stable, with 
very little frequency drift. 

I got my 1C-4A for just under 
$260 from my local ham radio 
store in December, 1961, and for 
another twenty dollars or so, 1 
could have gotten the touch* 
tone^^ pad version. 

I want to thank WASJ Jl for the 
improved antenna idea, my sis* 
ter Frances for the permanenf 
loan of two of her pizza pans, 
and also Mike Landis, who look 
the pictures. 

Now I can hardly wait for Icom 
to come out with its 23'Cm 
{IZtS-l 300-MHz) band HT. For 
more information, contact tcom 
Amefica, 2112 116th Ave, NE, 
Beilevue WA 98004. 

Walter R. Stringer N6BSG 

Ferndale Ml 

IC^25A 2M FM MOBILE RIG 

It may be a mystery to most of 
us how the manufacturer man- 



aged to stuff so many compo- 
nents, operating features, and 
good ideas into so small a pack- 
age, but it is no mystery that the 
trend In ham gear today Is 
toward the small. In this ham's 
opinion, with reference to 
medium power (25- W) VHF ham 
gear, the apogee of miniature 
electronics is reached by the 
Icom IC-25A two-meter FM 
mobile rig. 

Features 

The rig measures a mere 5 " by 
2" by 7" and weighs in at a paltry 
3.3 pounds. Within these tMN- 
putian dimensions, icom has 
crammed 48 transistors. 5 FETs, 
19 ICs. 91 diodes, and a4*bit mi- 
croprocessor to keep track of 
the lot. The result of this shoe- 
horning Is a feature-packed 
mobile radio that offers the 
user: 25-W/1-W power outputs, 
scanning of five memory and 
two vfo frequencies, full or pro- 
grammed band scan, program- 
mable splits for non-standard 
repeaters, dual-speed vfo tuning 
in 5'kHz or 15-kHz steps, seven- 
segment S/rf LED bar display, 
priority channel function, nor- 
mal/reverse function for moni' 
toring repeater inputs or work- 
ing inverse splits, and, most im- 
portant, two fully-independent 
vfo's. And all this from the front 
panel 1 

Should you require more op- 
tions, you need only open the 
top cover to gain access to: a 
scan speed control, a scan^stop 
timing control, a scan-stop timer 
switch, and a scan-stop func- 
tion switch. The last allows the 
operator to choose either busy 
or open channels for scan-slop. 

By comparison, the rear panel 
is simple. Here, arrayed around 
a massive heal sink of the 
SC1019 power amplifier, is a 
power-connection cable, an 
SO-239 antenna connector, and 
an external speaker jack (4 to 8 
Ohms). 

The 1C-25A Is designed to run 
off a 13.8-V-dc source, and no 
provisions are made for revers- 
ing the negative ground configu- 
ration of the supply. The manu- 
facturer claims that the unit 
draws 400 mA in squeiched re* 
ceive and 600 mA with full au- 
dio output of 2 Watts. In the 
transmit mode, the rig draws 1.3 
A at one Watt out and a healthy 
4.8 A for the full 25-W output. 
Icom suggests that a 6-A sup- 
ply be used in base-station 
applications. 



Design 

Electrically, the I025A ex- 
emplifies solid design practice. 
The transmitter uses a double* 
balanced mixer and variance-re- 
actance frequency modulation 
to generate t6F3 output. A high- 
impedance dynamic mike with 
built-in touchtone^^ pad and 
preamplifier is provided as stan- 
dard equipment. The receiver 
employs a double-conversion 
superhet scheme (i-fs at 16.9 
MHz and 455 kHz) as we it as a 
MOSFET rf amplifier. A doubie- 
balanced mixer, two monolithic 
crystal filters, and several 
ceramic filters are provided to 
improve setectivity. 

The most unusual aspect of 
the IC*25A's design is the dual 
vfo system. The rig's heredity 
can be seen clearly from its fre- 
quency control system, and 
anyone who has ever operated 
an Icom 701, 720, 730, etc., will 
feel quite at home with the IC- 
25A. At the heart of the fre- 
quency-control system is a digi* 
tal phase-locked loop (PLL) cir- 
cuit that generates 40-MHz and 
122-MHz signals. 

A rotary encoder connected 
directly to the main tuning dial 
generates clock pulses for 
up/down frequency selection. A 
4-bit-wide CPU chip running un- 
der the control of Icom firmware 
provides the smarts. The result 
in an extremely flexible frequen- 
cy-control system that allows 
for continuous tuning in 5-kHzor 
15-kH2 steps, depending on 
whichof thetwovfo's is chosen. 

About the only feature left out 
of the IC'25A's frequency selec- 
tion system is the ability to 
memorize offsets. As a result, 
operator intervention is required 
if operation is desired on a mem- 
ory frequency with a new split. 

Performance 

The bottom line for any piece 
of mobile gear is its perfor- 
mance on the open road. After 
commuting with the IC-25A for 
more than three months, 1 can 
say honestly that it is one of the 
friendliest mobile figs I have 
ever used. Of paramount Impor* 
tance m a rig this size is front- 
panel layout With 13 controls 
jammed into an 11 -square-inch 
area, the ergonomics of the lay- 
out had better be good. 

Vfo and memory-selection 
channel switches are located 
toward the driver, on the left 
side of the front panel. The large 
main tuning knob also is skewed 
to the left Volume/on-off and 



squelch/high-low power con^ 
trofs are placed adjacent to one 
another and, immedlateiy above 
them, three push switches pro- 
vide easy {yet isolated) access 
to scan-width cor>trol, simplex/ 
duplex control, and Nor/Rev 

function. 

The one inconvenient place- 
ment on the front panel is the 
proximity of the memory-write 
switch and the scan-stop 
switch. A problem often occurs 
when, in an effort to initiate 
scanning, an operator inadver- 
tently depresses the memory- 
write switch. When this hap* 
pens, an erroneous frequency 
(whatever happens to be in the 
vfo at the time) will be written in- 
to one of the memory channels. 
The problem is further com- 
pounded by the identical feel of 
the switches. {Mike-scan control 
is an option, however.) 

Another front-panel short- 
coming involves the display. 
Aside from the normal visibility 
problems inherent with red dis- 
plays operating in bright sun- 
light, the IC-25A display is diffi- 
cult to read because it uses an 
LED instead of a full 7-segment 
digit in the S-kHz position. As a 
result, It can be difficult to dis^ 
cern whether the frequency is 
7.37 or 7.375. There seems to be 
room on the front paneJ for a full- 
size 4'digit display, and the rig 
certainly would benefit from the 
addition of a real digit in the 
5'kHz position. 

Used In conjunction with a 
1/4-wave whip, the I025A was 
able to access any repealer it 
heard, in fact, it often heard too 
much. My unit displayed adja- 
cent-channel interference on 
strong signals (40-60 dB) 15 kHz 
away from the center of the 
passband, resulting In cross* 
modulation of the incoming 
audio. The problem seemed 
more acute on the high side of 
the passband, indicating a 
slight receiver alignment irregu- 
larity: In any case, the problem, 
though annoying, was apparent 
on(y on the strongest of signals. 

With any radio of this com- 
plexity and compactness, docu- 
mentation is crucial. Icom has 
done a laudable job In this area, 
and its efforts are by no means 
limited to the 34*page owner's 
manual. An 11 " by 16 "schemat- 
ic is included as well as life^size 
component overlays for each PC 
board. When used in conjunc- 
tion with the comprehensive 
theory^of -operation section of 
the manual, graphics like these 
could get hams once more into 

73 Magazine • JulyJ982 135 



troubleshooting and even re- 
pairing their own gear, 

Tlie IC-25A Is an fmpressive 
package of performance and 
features at a very competitive 
price, (The list price is $349.) Its 
small size will make it attractive 
to owners of today's gas-effi- 
cient micro-cars, and as an add- 
ed benefit, when installed in- 
dash like a norma! car radio, the 
rig is relatively immune to theft. 
If you want big radio functions 
fn a small package, Icom's new 
IC-25A is worth your considera- 
tion. 

For more Information, con- 
tact tcom America, 2112 116th 
A\/e. NE, Bellevue WA 93004. 

Chris Brown KA1 D 
Groton MA 

HEATHKIT MODEL VL-USO 
ALL-MODE VHF AMPLIFIER 

New England is a land of hilts 
and valleys; It's challenging 
country for 2-meter mobile oper- 
ation, I discovered just how 
challenging shortly after install- 
ing a 10-Watt rig in my car. De- 
lighted at being able to hear my 
buddies chatting on a popular 
repeater some 20 mi Jes di stant, I 
attempted to join the conversa- 
tion, "Sorry old man, you're not 
quite making the machine." 
How humiliating! 

An amplifier was definitely in 
order. And since my 2-meter rig 
is an all-mode radio, I wanted an 
amp suitable for SSB and CW, 
as well as FM. The Heathkit 
VL-1 180 All-Mode VHF Amplifier 
had just been announced. As a 
long-time Heathkit builder, I 
couldn't resist- 

Description 

The VL-1 180 is a linear ampli- 
fier covering the 144-148-MHz 
range. It is designed for use with 
escciters providing between 1 
and 10 Watts of drive. A Motor- 




Heath VL-1180 All-Mode VHF Ampfifier, The amplifier board is on the left, T~R board on the right. 



ola MRF-247 transistor is used 
as the final, and the nominal 
output is 75 Watts with 10 Watts 
input. Insertion toss is 0.6 dB. 
The amplifier features a self* 
contained transmit-receive (T-R) 
relay which is keyed either by a 
push-to-talk line from the exciter 
or by the rf sensing circuit built 
into the VL-1 180. The amplifier 
operates on 11,5-15 V dc and 
draws 11 Amps at 75 Watts out- 
put Standby current is a mere 3 
mA, 

The VL^1160 measures 2-1/2 
X 4^5/8 X 10-1/2 inches and 
weighs 3-1/2 pounds. A power 
switch is the only control provid- 
ed. The power leads and T-R 
switching line (if used) enter the 
amplifier by way of a three-con- 
ductor Molex^-^ plug. 

Except for connectors and 
the power switch, ail compo- 
nents m the VL-1 180 mount on a 
pair of doubie-sided printed cir- 
cuit boards. The larger of the 
two holds the amplifier circuitry. 
A smaller board contains T-R 



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AIS Buiidy low profile (C Sockets just H per pin 

Esornpte: 8 pin— ac: 40 pin— 40c per pin UG 176 Reducef— la's 1,99 

Ham IV Rotor-£r65.00 SO 239— 10/$5.S9 

Col u m bi a S Co n (2 tf 1 8ffi ft 22) — 1 7(|/Ft, 3 amp f use— 20/$1 .50 

Columbia RG 59v 100 foit shield TV lype— 7(t/ft, GouJd 9V Ni cad— $4.86 

Berk Tek Grey 96% RG 8X^l4eytl. Gould \.2v 500 mAh A A NJcad 

US made PL 259— 1 D/$5.50 1 0;$1 4 . 50 1 00.^ 1 25.00 



Call for Quantity Quotes 




master chafige 



Universal Dist. 
RAYMOND RICHARD 

RT. 1.BOX26E 
CLERMONT, FL 32711 



(904)394^2511 
(313)278-8217 



:^165 



switching. Assembling the am- 
plifief took five easy evenings. 
While no insurmountable prob- 
lems were encountered, the am- 
plifier board was a challenge in 
one respect. 

In order to ensure a good con- 
nection between the ground 
foils on the top and bottom of 
the board, you are instructed to 
install and solder in place 47 tiny 
rivets. While tedious, this is a 
Simple procedure. The rub 
comes when, in six places, you 
are required to solder a metal- 
cased mica capacitor to the cir- 
cuit board, squarely on top of a 
rivet head. Due to the presence 
of the rivet, It is difficult to gel 
the "continuous bonding" be- 
tw/een capacitor and PC foil 
called for in the manyal. A sim- 
ple relocation of the six offend- 
ing rivet holes would cure a mi- 
nor but aggravating problem. As 
with all Heathkits, the best 
course is to follow the instruc^ 
tions as ciosely as possible. 

With the VL 1180 temporarily 
installed in my car, alignment 
was a breeze, requiring about 15 
minutes from start to finish. 
Tune-up is accomplished with a 
minimum of equipment: a 2-me- 
ter exciter, an swr meter, and a 
dummy load. Heath deserves a 
round of applause for designing 
an amplifier that Is so easy to 
align; they even supply the nec- 
essary alignment tools. When 
aligned at 146 MHz, the output 
with 10-W drive was at least 80 
W across the entire 2-meter 
band. One Watt of drive pro- 
duced 9 Watts out. Input swr 
was less than 1.5:1 throughout 
the band. 



The additional power provid- 
ed by the VL-1180 has made all 
the difference in my FM mobile 
operations. No more humiliation 
when attempting to join the fun 
on the repeater! The amplifier 
has proven itself on SSB as well. 
I have spent many a Sunday af- 
ternoon atop our local drive-up 
mountain talking to the SSB 
boys on 144.2 MHz, using a por* 
table five-element beam. 

After more than six months of 
heavy use, the VL-1 180 contin- 
ues to perform well Output pow- 
er is unchanged from the origi- 
nal 80 Watts. The low standby 
current drain means that the 
amplifier can be left turned on at 
ail times, unless the car Isn't go- 
ing to be driven for weeks on 
end. 

Summary 

Heath has done a nice job in 
creating an all-mode 2-meter lin- 
ear kit that goes together with- 
out much difficulty and doesn't 
require a sophisticated test 
bench to align. A solution to the 
rivet problem should be consid- 
ered, however, even if it's only to 
acknowledge it in the manual 
Ideally, Heath should switch to 
a circuit board with plated- 
through holes. 

The bottom line Is, that de- 
spite minor construction diffi- 
culties, my VL-1 180 worked the 
first time out and has worked 
ever since. It*s hard to ask more 
from any piece of equipment. 
The VL-1 180 is priced at $137.95 
from Heath Company, Benton 
Harbor M! 49022. Reader Service 
number 475. 

Jeff DeTray WB6BTH 
7^ Magazine Staff 



136 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



mELUTBS 



PHASE llfB LAUNCH DELAYED 

We1t all have a bit more time to prepare for Phase HI sateNite ac* 
tivify. The Eufopean Space Agency (ESA) has announced a delay of 
at least two months in the f tight that is scheduled to carry AMSAT's 
Phase NIB satellite. At best, the launch will now occur in late Sep* 
tember; rt was originally set for July. 

The problem is not with the Phase NIB satellite or the Ariane 
launch vehicle, but with the design of the satellite that is to be the 
main payload on several Artane launches. A similar satellite, 
MAREGS'A, was launched in December and hasdevetoped some un- 
expected problems. Until the causes and cures for the problems caf> 
be determined, the scheduling of the Phase IIIB launch will remam 
uncertain. 



TEN-TEC RIG 

At the Dayton Hamvention in late April. Ten-Tec displayed a proto- 
type of a rig designed to ease the average amateur into Phase III sat- 
ellite communications, using the Mode B (436-144 MHz) tran- 
sponder. The new unit contains a 10-W, 435-MHz CW/SSB tfansmft- 
ter and a 2-to-l0*meter receive converter. Assuming you already 
have 10-meter recetvlr^g capability, you need only add antennas for 
435 and 144 MHz to complete your Phase III sateirite station. Ten- 
Tec doesn't plan to release the rig until Phase IIIB is safely aloft, i.e., 
sometime this fall. 



ORBITAL CALENDARS 

Project OSCAR, a California-based group of amateur satellite en* 
thusiasts, has produced a comprehensive calendar of orbital predic- 
tions covering OSCAR 8 and all six Soviet RS satellites. This volume 
gives the time and longitude of the northbound equatorial crossing 
for each orbit of each satellite from May 1 through December 31, 
1982- It's a must for satellite chasers- The calendar is available for 
an $875 donation. Your check or money order payable to Project 
OSCAR, Inc.. should be mailed to POB 1136. Los Altos CA 94022: The 
price includes postage. 

Thanks to AMSAT Sateifite Report for some of the preceding in- 
formation.— WB86TH. 

ORBITAL INFORMATION 



05CAF B Reference Orbits " JuJ.^ 
Dat« 



OSCAR 6 Reference Orblte - August 



Time 
(tJTC> 



Eq. Crossing 
(Degrees West) 



1 
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11 
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27 
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n 



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0022:04 
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COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION 



(We Speak Your 
Language.) 

Backed by over 54 years of experience, Harvey 
continues to offer the broadest selection and finest 
service available for the amateur radio community. 
This experience has taught us that the ham needs 
special treatment and that is why Harvey has estab- 
lished a special division dedicated to the needs of 
the U.S. and foreign ham alike. 

One thing is for certain, A ham will never get the 
run around from Harvey. If we don't have something 
in stock, we say so and will order it for you -or— tell 
you where to get it. However, we are sincerely dedi- 
cated to the ham community and, as a result, our 

expansive in- 
ventory means 
that, more than 
likely, we will 
have what you 
are looking for 
In stock. 






ICOM tC-720A 



*•/ 



Yaasu FT-One 



lie eudh 



r^,. 



flP POWlfl 



EKHQEI] Hf ALL BAWD T HAIiffCKIVEII, 



a HI 



AGA 


^HS^^^^^B^ 




Atliance 


^Hs^^^9^^3 




Antenna SpBCiaiists 


^B!SCa!^^^^^^I^3^^H 


^^^^^^^EVV^^^^^^^^Li^^hM^^^^^^^^^BU 


Astron 


K^flp .^H^BUH 




Bearcat 


H^^^^^^H^I 




Bencher 


^^^^^^^^^BB^^I 




B&W 






Centurion 


K. 0. K, 


Ritron 


ao.E. 


Larsen 


Russett 


Cushcmft 


McKay Dymek 


Signais 


R, L. Drake 


M.f.J. 


Sine fair 


Gotham Antennas 


Midtand 


Jeieit Hygatn 


Gruntjfg 


X W. Miifer 


Triiectrtc 


Henry Radto 


Mifage 


System One 


H.M, Efectrontc$ 


Wm. M, Nye 


VoCom 


tcom 


Pace 


W. S. Engmeering 


Kantrontcs 


HegBncy 


Yaesu 



CALL TOLL FREE: 

1-800-223-2642 



Ask for Dou "Joe' Chin- KB2MU 



129 




25 W.45th St.. N.Y., N.Y. 10036 C212) 921-5920 



^ S*» List of AdvertiSi^fS On jmg^ t M 



JSMagazme • JulyJ9a2 137 



^-^* electrof||c^ 



Introducing 



(602) 242-3037 
(602) 242*8916 

2111 W. CAMELBACK ROAD 
PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85015 



TVRO CIRCUIT BOARDS 

Satellite Receiver Boards— Now in Stock 



DUAL CONVERSION BOARD. $25-00 

This board provides conversion from the 3.7-4.2 band first to 
900 MHz where gain and bandpass filtering are provided and, 
second, to 70 MHz. The board contains both local oscillators, 
one fixed and the other variable, and the second mixer. Con- 
struction is greatly simplified by the use of Hybrid IC annplifiers 
for the gain stages. 



SIX 47pF CHIP CAPACITORS 

For use with dual conversion board 



$6.00 



70 MHz IF BOARD . $25-00 

This circuit provides about 43dB gain with 50 ohm input and 
output Impedance. It is designed to drive the HOWARD/ 
COLEMAN TVRO Demodulator. The on-board bandpass filter 
can be tuned for bandwidths between 20 and 35 MHz with a 
passband fipple of less than V2 dB, Hybrid IC*s are used for 
the gain stages. 



SEVEN .01 pF CHIP CAPACITORS 
For use with the 70 MHz IF board, , 



. $7.00 



DEMODULATOR BOARD $40.00 

This circuit takes the 70 MHz center frequency satellite TV sig- 
nals in the 10 to 200 millivolt range, detects them using a phase 
locked loop, de-emphasizes and fitters the result and ampli- 
fies the result to produce standard NTSC video. Other outputs 
include the audio subcarrier, a DC voltage proportional to the 
strength of the 70 MHz signal, and AFC voltage centered at 
about 2 volts DC. 

SINGLE AUDIO. $15.00 

This circuit recovers the audio signals from the 6,8 MHz fre- 
quency. The Miller 9051 coils are tuned to pass the 6.8 MHz 
subcarrier and the Miller 9052 coil tunes for recovery of 
the audio, 

DUAL AUDIO ,.,...... .... .$25.00 

Duplicate of the single audio but aEso covers the 6.2 range. 

DC CONTROL. $15.00 

SPECIAL SET OF FIVE BOARDS. .$100.00 

INCLUDING DUAL AUDIO (2 single audio boards) 



1900 to 2500 MHz MICROWAVE DOWNCONVERTER 

MICROWAVE RECEIVER This receiver is tunable over a range of 1900 to 2500 MHz approximately, and 
is interrded for amateur use. The local oscillator is voltage controlled, making the I.F. range approximate- 
ly 54 to 88 MHz for standard TV set channels 2 thru 7. 

P.C. BOARD with DATA 1to5 $15.00 6to11 $13.00 12to26 $11.00 27-up $9.00 

P.C. Board with all parts for assembly $49.99 P.C. Board with all chip caps soldered on. . .$30.00 

P.C. Board with all parts for assembly P.C. Board assembled & tested $69.99 

plus 2N6603 $69.99 P.C. Board assembled & tested with 2N6603$79.99 

HMR II DOWNCONVERTER with Power Supply, Antenna (Dish) & all Cables for instatlation. 180 Day Warranty. 

1to5 $150.00 6 to 11 $140.00 12 -up $125.00 

YAGl DOWNCONVERTER with Power Supply, Antenna (Yagi) & all Cables for installation. 90 Day Warranty. 

1to5 $150.00 6 to 11 $140.00 12 -up $125.00 

YAGI DOWNCONVERTER as above but Kit. (NO GABLES) With Box. 

1to5 $125.00 6 to 11 $115.00 12 -up $100.00 

HMR II DOWNCONVERTER as above but Kit. (NO CABLES) With PVC. 

1to5 $125.00 6 to 11 $115.00 12- up $100.00 



SPECIAL NEW STOCK OF CARBIDE DRILL BITS— YOUR CHOICE $1.99 



1 


SPECIAL NEV 


1.25rMm 




13/64 


1.45mm 




19 


3.2mm 




20 


3.3mm 




24 


1/8 




26 


3/16 




29 


5/32 




30 


7/32 




31 



36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
44 
^5 
46 



47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 



55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 



63 
64 
65 
67 
68 
69 



138 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



start taking calls in curious places with the 
revolutionary, new Cordless (o&coM Phone 

Special Purchase— The t^^^^/'" Cordless Telephone! 

We are pleased to announce the Escort Mark III is now available 
at special pricing. We bought the manufacturer's entire inventory- 

and we are passing the savings on to you! 

The Escort Mark m was originally designed to retail for $199.95. Now, we 

suggest a retail price of $169.95 to $189.95. Or, you can move them 

out at $149.95. In any event, youMl like the profit margins. 



QUANTITY 

1 — 2 units 

3 — 5 units 

6—11 units 

12—23 units 



DEALER PRICE 

69.75 each 
64.50 each 
62.50 each 
60.75 each 



GROSS PROFIT A T $149, 95 

55% 
57% 
58% 
59% 



On all orders of 12 or more, we pay the freight! This is your opportunity 
to stock up for the Christmas buying season. These are ideal gift 

items, that will really move out! 



ESCORT MARK III SPECIFICATIONS 



VHF DUPLEXERS 

This duplexer was made for RF Harris Mobile 
Phones and Two Way Radios. These duplex- 
ers can be used in any mobile phone or two 
way radio system, along with having the ca- 
pabilities to be modiited lor UHF use. The 
physical dimensions are 3 3/5* Long, 4 2/5" 
Wide, and 1 1/10" Deep. The approximate 
weight is 18oz./1 lb. 2 oz.. PRICE $74.99 



»» 



>fr 



#'^ 



i M 



^i«i. 







^ 



€P 



I 



Operates as a regular telephone on touch-tone or 
rotary dial systems 

Range up to 300 feet 

Ni-Cad rechargeable batteries Included 
in telephone 

Charger built into base transmitter 

Simple plug-in instaltation! 

High-performance antenna 

Full duplex, answer and dial out 

Full FCC approval 

Exactly As Shown 




HOW WE CUT THE CORD. 

The new Cordless Phone 
works on a simple, 
highly sophisticated principle. 
A small base station plugs into 
your regular phone jack, and 
an electrical wall outlet, The 
base station then transmits 
any in- or out-going call to the 
handheld receiver, anywhere 
up to 300 feet- 



yi^^MSsf-MHA^. 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 




^*^ilz e1ectroi|ic§ 



73 Magazine * July, 1982 139 



"FILTERS" 



Collins Mechanical Filter #526-9724-010 Model F455Z32F 
455KH2 at 3. ZKHz Wide. 



$15.00 



Atlas Crystal Filters 

5.52-2.7/8 5.52MHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole 

5.595MHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole upper sideband 
5.595KHz/.500KHz wide 4 pole CW 
5.595MHz/2.7KH2 wide 8 pole lower sideband 
5.595MHz/2,7KH2 wide 8 pole upper sideband 
5.645MHZ/2.7KHZ wide 8 pole 
g.OMHz/ 8 pole sideband and CW 



5.595-2.7/8/U 

5.595-.500/4/CW 

5.595-2.7/LSB 

5.595-2.7/USB 

5.645-2.7/B 

9.0SB/CW 



Your Choice 
$12.99 



Kokusai Electric Co. Mechanical Filter #MF-455-ZL-21H 

455KHZ at Center Frequency of 453. 5Kc Carrier Frequency of 455Kc 2.36Kc Bandwidth 



$15.00 



Crystal Filters 
Nikko FX-07800C 

TEW FEC-103-2 

Tyco/CD 001019880 



Motorola 


4884863B01 


PTI 


535QC 


PTI 


5426C 


CD 


A10300 



7 . 8HHz 

10.5935 

10.7MH2 2 pole 15KHz Bw. Motorola #48D84396K01 

Thru #48DB4396K05 

11.7MHz 2 pole 15KHZ Bandwidth 

12MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

21.4MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

45MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth (For Motorola 

Communications equipment} 



10.00 
10.00 

4.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 



Ceramic Filters 



Murata 


BFB455B 


455KHZ 






CFM455E 


455KHZ +- 


5.5KHZ 




CFM455D 


455KHZ +- 


7 KHz 




CFR455E 


455KHZ +- 


5.5KHZ 




CFU455E 


455KHZ +- 


1.5KHZ 




CFU455G 


455KHZ +- 


IKHz 




CFW455D 


455KHZ +- 


IKHz 




CFW455H 


455KHZ +- 


3 KHz 




SFB455D 


455KHZ 






SFE10.7 


10.7MHz 






SFG10.7MA 


10.7MH2 




Clevite 


TO-OIA 


455KHZ 






T0-02A 


455KHZ 




Nippon 


LF-B4/CFU455I 


455KHZ +- 


IKHz 




LF-B6/CFU455H 


455KHZ +- 


IKHz 




LF-C18 


455KHZ 




Tokin 


CF455A/BFU455K 


4 55 KHz +- 


ZKHz 


Matsushira 


EFC-L455K 


455KHZ 




ROTRON MUFFIN FANS Model Mar 


k 4/MU2A1 


d ■ J 



$ 2.40 
6.65 
6.65 
B.OO 
2.90 
2.90 
2,90 
4.35 
2.40 
2.67 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.80 
5.80 
10,00 
4,80 
7.00 



These fans are new factory boxed 115vac at 14watts 50/60cps 
CFM is 38 at 50cps and 105 at 60cps. 



Impedance Protected-F 



$ 7.99 



SPECTRA PHYSICS INC . Model 088 HeNe Laser Tubes. 

Power output l.Bmw. Beam Dia. .75mm. Beam Dir. 2.7mr. 8Kv starting voltage 

68K ohm Iwatt ballast lOOOvdc +-100vdc 3.7ma. TUBES ARE NEW $59.99 



140 73Magazine • July, 1982 




"AMPLIFIERS" 



AVANTEK LOW NOISE AMPLIFIERS 



Models 


UTC2-I02M 


AP-20-T 


AL-45-0-1 


Frequency' Range 


30 to 200MC 


200 to 400MC 


450 to 800MC 


Noise Figure 


1.5dB 


6.5dB 


7dB 


Voltage 


+15vdc 


+24vdc 


-6vdc @ +12vd 


Gain 


29dB 


30dB 


30dB 


Power Output 


IdB Gain +7dBm 


IdB Gain +20dBm 


IdB Gain -5dB 


Price 


$49.99 


$49.99 


$49.99 



AK-IQOOM 

500 to lOOOMC 

2.5dB 

+12vdc @ -12vdc 

25dB 

IdB Gain +8dBm 

$69.99 



Mini Circuits Double Balanced Mixers 



Model RAY-3 

Very High Level (+23dBm LO) 70KHz to 200MHz L0,RF,DC to 200MHz IF 

Conversion Loss,dB One Octave From Band Edge 6Typ./7.5Max. Total Range 5.5Typ./8Max. 

Isolation, dB Lower Band Edge To One Decade Higher (LO-RF/LO-IF) 55Typ./45Min. Mid. Range 

(LO-RF/LO-IF) 40Typ./30Min. Upper Band Edge To One Octave Lower (LO-RF/LO-IF) SOTyp./ 

25Min. 

Price $24.99 

Model TSM-3 

Standard Level (+7dBin LO) ,lMHz to 400MHz LO,RF,DC to 400MHz IF 

Conversion Loss,dB One Octave From Band Edge 5.3Typ./7-5Mdx, Total Range 5.5Typ./8-5r4ax. 

Isolation, dB Lower Band Edge To One Decade Higher (LO-RF/LO-IF) 60Typ./50Min. Mid. Range 

(LO-RF/LO-IF) SOTyp. /35Min, Upper Band Edge To One Octave Lower (LO-RF/LO-IF) 35TYP,/ 

25Min. 

Price $11.99 



Hewlett Packard Linear Power Microwave RF Transistor HXTR5401/35831E 



Collector Base Brakedown Voltage at Ic=100ua 
Collector Emitter Brakedown Voltage at Ic=500ua 
Collector Cutoff Current at Vcb=15v 
Forward Current Transfer Ratio at Vce=15v5lc=15m3 
Transducer Power Gain at V€e=18v,Ice=60md5F=26Hz- 
Maximum Available Gain at Vce=18v Jc=60ina,F=lGHz/F=2GHz 
Price $29.99 



35volts min, 
30volts min. 
lOOua max. 
15min540typ*125max 
3dBmin,4dBtyp 
14dB typ,SdB typ 



Motorola RF Power Amplifier Modules 

■ — — — ^ 1 ^ ' ■! 



Model 


MHW612A 


MHW613A 


MHW710 


MHW720 


Frequency Range 


146 to 147MHz 


150 to 174MHz 


400 to 512MH2 


400 to 470MHz 


Voltage 


12.5vdc 


12.5vdc 


12. 5vdc 


12.5vdc 


Output Power 


20watts 


SOwatts 


ISwatts 


20watts 


Minimum Gain 


20dB 


20dB 


19.4dB 


21dB 


Harmonics 


-30dB 


-30dB 


40dB 


40dB 


RF Input Power 


400inw 


SOOmw 


250II1W 


250mw 


Price 


$57.50 


$59.80 


$57.50 


$69.00 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



(f\I^I^ electrof|ie$ 



73 Magazine * July, 1982 141 



"TRANSISTORS" 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M62 3.7 to 4.2GHz Communication Band Double Balanced Mixer 



$100.00 



SSB Conversion Loss 4.9dB Typ. 

5.5dB Typ. 



SSB Noise Fiqure 



Isolation 

fL at 

a at 



4.9dB Typ. 
5.5dB Typ. 



6dB Max. fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz 
6.5dB Max. fl DC to 1125MH2 fL fR 

fl 880MHz fL fR 
fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz 
6dB Max. fl 30 to 1125HHz fL fR 
6.5dB Max. fl 880MHz fL fR 



R 30dB Min. 40dB 

I 25dB Min. 30dB 

20dB Min. 30dB 

l5dB Min. 25dB 

Conversion Compression IdB Max. 

Flatness 



Typ. fL 2.8 to 5.35GHz 

Typ. fl 4.5 to 5.35GHz 

Typ. fL 3.6 to 4.5GHz 

Typ. fL 2.8 to 3.6GHz 



fR Level +2dBm 
.2dB Peak to Peak Over any 40MHz Segment of fR=3.7 to 4.2GHz 
Third Order Input Intercept +lldBm fRl=4GHz fR2=4.01GHz Both at -5dBm a=4.5GHz 

Group Time Delay .5ns Typ. .75ns Max. fR3.7 to 4.2GHz fL 34B0MHZ 9 +13dBm 



VSWR 



L-Port 
R-Port 

I -Port 



1.25:1 



1.25 
1.4 

1.5 

1,3 
1.8 



1 

1 
1 
1 
1 



Typ. 
Typ. 

Typ. 
Typ. 

Typ. 
Typ. 



2 
2 
2 
2 
2 












2.5 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



fL 2.8 to 5.35GHz 

fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz fl fR 

fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz fL fR 

fI=100MHz 
fl=500MHz 
fI=1125MHz 



SGS/ATES RF Transistors 






Motorola RF Transistor 


Type. 


BFQ85 




BFW92 


MRF901 


2N6603 


Collector Base V 


20v 




25v 


25v 


25v 


Collector Emitter 


V 15v 




15v 


15v 


15v 


Emitter Base V 


3v 




2.5v 


3v 


3v 


Collector Current 


40ma 




25ma 


30ma 


30ma 


Power Dissipation 


200mw 




190mw 


375Tnw 


400mw 


HFE 


40min, 200max. 




20min. 150max. 


30min. 200max. 


30min. 200max. 


FT 


4GHZ tnin. 5GHz 


max 


.1.6GHz Typ. 


4.5GHz typ. 


2GHz min. 


Noise Fiqure 


IGHz 3dB Max. 




500MHz 4dB Typ. 


IGHz 2dB Typ. 


2GHz 2.9dB Typ. 


Price 


$1.50 




$1.50 


$2.00 


$10.00 


National Semiconductor Variable Vol 


tag 


e Regulator Sale 


! ! M r 1 ! M 




LM317K 


LM350K 




LM723G/L 


LM7805/a6/Q8/ 12/15/18/24 


1.2 to 37vdc 


1.2 to 33vdc 




2 to 37vdc 


5, 6, 8,12, 


,l5,l8,24vdc 


l.SAmps 


3Amps 




150ma. 


lAmp 




TO -3 


TO- 3 




TO-lOO/TO-116 


T0-220/T0-3 




$4.50 


$5.75 




$1.00 $1.25 


$1.17 $2.00 





P & B Solid State Relays Type ECT1DB72 



*May Be Other Brand Equivalent 

Toll Free Number 
600-528-01 80 
(For orders only) 



5VDC Turn On 120VAC Contact 7Anips 

20Amps on 10"xl0"x.062" Alum.Heatsink with 
Silicon Grease $5.00 



(f\I^l^ elect roi|ic$ 



142 73 Magazine * JufyJW2 



"MIXERS" 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M6 Double Balanced Mixer 



LO and RF 0.2 to 300MHz 
Conversion Loss (SSB) 

Noise Figure (SSB) 

Conversion Compression 



IF DC to 300MHz 
6.5dB Max. 1 to 50MHz 
8.5dB Max. .2 to 300MHz 
same as above 
S.5dB Max. 50 to 300MHz 
.3dB Typ. 



$21.00 



WITH DATA SHEET 



NEC (NIPPON ELECTRIC CO. LTD. 



NF Min F=2GHz 
F=3GHz 
F=4GHz 



dB 2.4 Typ. 
dB 3,4 Typ. 
dB 4.3 Typ. 



NE57835/2SC2150 Microwave Transistor 

MAG 



F=2GH2 
F=3GHz 
F=4GHz 



dB 
dB 
dB 



12 Typ. 
9 Typ. 

6.5 Typ 



$5,30 



Ft Gain Bandwidth Product at Vce=8v, Ic=10fna, GHz 4 Min. 
Vcbo 25v Vceo llv Vebo 3v Ic 50ma. Pt. 



6 Typ. 
250niw 



UNELCQ RF Power and Linear Amplifier Capacitors 

These are the famous capacitors used by all the RF Power and Linear Amplifier manufacutures 
and described in the Motorola RF Data Book. 



lOpf 
13pf 
14pf 
20pf 



22pf 
25pf 
27pf 
27.5pf 



30pf 
32pf 
33pf 
34pf 



40pf 
43pf 
62pf 
80pf 



lOOpf 
120pf 
180pf 
200pf 



250pf 1 to lOpcs. .&0i each 

82Qpf 11 to 50pcs. .50(i each 

51 to lOOpcs. .40^ each 



NIPPON ELECTRIC COMPANY TUNNEL DIODES 



Peak Pt. Current ma. 
Valley Pt. Current ma. 
Peak Pt. Voltage mv. 
Projected Peak Pt. Voltage mv. 
Series Res. Ohms 
Terminal Cap. pf. 
Valley Pt. Voltage mv. 



Iv 

Vp 

Vpp Vf=Ip 

rS 

vv 



MODEL 1S2199 
9min* lOTyp* Umax. 
1.2Typ, 1.5max, 
95Typ. 120max. 
480i?iin, 550Typ. 530max 
2,5Typ, 4max, 
l,7Typ. 2max* 
370Typ. 



1S2200 ^ 

9min, lOTyp, Umax. 

l-2Typ, 1.5max. 

75Typ, 90rT]ax, 

440min. 520Typ, BOOmax 

2Typ. 3max. 

5Typ. Smax. 

350Typ, 



FAIRCHILD / DUMONT Oscinoscope Probes Model 4290B 

Input Impedance 10 meg.. Input Capacity 6,5 to 12pf . , Division Ration (Volts/Div Factor) 

10:1, Cable Length 4Ft. , Frequency Range Over lOOMHz. 

These Probes will work on all Tektronix, Hewlett Packard, and other Oscilloscopes. 

PRICE $45.00 



MOTOROLA RF DATA BOOK 



List all Motorola RF Transistors / RF Power Amplifiers, Varactor Diodes and much much 
more. 



PRICE $7.50 



TofI Free Number 
600-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



(fVfl^ electroiycg 



73 Magazine • July, 1982 143 



"SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS" 



EIMAC TUBE SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS 



SKllO 


Socket 


SK406 


Chimney 


SK416 


Chimney 


SK500 


Socket 


SK506 


Chimney 


SK600 


Socket 


SK602 


Socket 


SK606 


Chimney 


SK607 


Socket 


SK610 


Socket 


SK620 


Socket 


SK620A 


Socket 


JOHNSON 


TUBE SOCKETS 



$ POR 
35.00 
22 



330 
47 
39 
56 
8 
43 
44 
45 
50 



00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
80 
00 
00 
00 
50 



SK626 


Chimney 


SK630 


Socket 


SK636B 


Chimney 


SK640 


Socket 


SK646 


Chimney 


SK711A 


Socket 


SK740 


Socket 


SK770 


Socket 


SK800A 


Socket 


SK806 


Chimney 


SK900 


Socket 


SK906 


Chimney 



$ 7.70 
45.00 
26.40 
27.50 
55.00 

192.50 
66.00 
66.00 

150.00 
30.80 

253.00 
44.00 



124-115-2/SK620A Socket 
124-116/SK630A Socket 



$ 30.00 
40.00 



124-113 Bypass Cap. 
122-0275-001 Socket 
(For 4-250A,4-400A,3-400Z, 
3-500Z) 



$ 10.00 

10.00 
2/$15.00 



CHIP CAPACITORS 

.8pf 

ipf 
l.lpf 

1.4pf 

1.5pf 

1.8pf 

2.2pf 

2.7pf 

3.3pf 

3.6pf 

3.9pf 

4.7pf 

5.6pf 

6,Bpf 

8.2pf 



PRICES: 



I to 10 - 

II to 50 - 
51 to 100 



lOpf 
12pf 
15pf 
IBpf 
20pf 
22pf 
24pf 
27pf 
33pf 
39pf 
47 pf 
51pf 
56pf 
68pf 
82pf 

.99i 
.90(t 
.80(t 



lOOpf* 

llOpf 

120pf 

130pf 

150pf 

160pf 

IBOpf 

200pf 

220pf* 

240pf 

270pf 

300pf 

330pf 

360pf 

390pf 



430pf 
470pf 
510pf 



620pf 

680pf 

820pf 

lOOOpf/.OOluf* 

1800pf/.0018iif 

2700pf/.0027iif 

10,000pf/.01uf 

12,000pf/.012uf 

15,000pf/.015uf 

18,000pf/.018uf 



101 to 1000 .60i 
1001 & UP .35(t 



* IS A SPECIAL PRICE: 



10 for $7.50 
100 for $65.00 
1000 for $350.00 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-V907: Voltage Controlled Microwave Oscillator 



$110.00 



Frequency range 3.6 to 4.2GHz, Power ouput, Min. lOdBm typical, 8dBm Guaranteed. 
Spurious output suppression Harmonic (nfo), min. 20dB typical, In-Band Non-Harmonic, min. 
60dB typical, Residual FM, pk to pk, Max. 5KH2, pushing factor. Max. 8KH2/V, Pulling figure 
(1.5:1 VSWR), Max. 6OMH2, Tuning voltage range +1 to +15voUs, Tuning current, Max. -0.1mA, 
TTiodulation sensitivity range, Max. 120 to 30MHz/V, Input capacitance, Max. lOOpf, Oscillator 
Bias +15 +-0.05 volts i? 55mA, Max. 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-01 80 
(For orders only) 



(^^l|z elect roi|ics 



144 73Magazfne • July, 1982 



6i 



TUBES" 



TUBES 

2E26 

2K28 

3B2S 

3-500Z 

3-1000Z/8164 

3CX1000A/8283 

3X2500A3 

4-65A/8165 

4-125A/4D21 

4-250A/5D22 

4-400A/8438 

4-400C/6775 

4-1000A/8166 

4CS250R 

4X150A/7034 

4X150D/7035 

4X150G 

4X250B 

4CX250B/7203 

4CX250F/72O4 

4CX250FG/8621 

4CX250K/8245 

4CX250R/7580W 

4CX300A 

4CX350A/8321 

4CX350FJ/8904 

4X500A 

4CX600J 

4CX1000A/8168 

4CX1500B/8660 

4CX3000A/816g 

4CX5000A/8170 

4CX10000D/8I71 

4CX15000A/8281 

4E27/A/5-123A/B 

4PR60A 

4PR60B/8252 

KT88 

DX362 

DX415 

572B/T160L 

811 

81 lA 

812A 

813 

4624 

4665 

555 lA 

5563A 

5675 



PRICE 

$ 4.69 

100.00 

5.00 

102.00 

300.00 

200.00 

200.00 

45.00 

58.00 

68.00 

71.00 

80.00 

300.00 

59.00 

30.00 

40.00 

50.00 

30.00 

45.00 

45.00 

55.00 

100.00 

69.00 

99.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

300.00 

300 . 00 

300.00 

300.00 

400.00 

500.00 

700.00 

40.00 

100.00 

175.00 

15.00 

35,00 

35.00 

44.00 

10.00 

13.00 

15.00 

38.00 

100.00 

350.00 

100.00 

77.00 

15.00 



TUBES 



PRICE 



TUBES 



PRICE 



5721 


$200.00 


8462 


$100.00 


5768 


85.00 


8505A 


73.50 


5836 


100.00 


8533W 


92.00 


5837 


100.00 


8560A 


55.00 


5861/EC55 


110.00 


8560AS 


57.00 


587 6A 


15.00 


8608 


34.00 


5881/6L6 


5.00 


8624 


67.20 


5894/A 


45.00 


8637 


38.00 


5894B 


55.00 


8647 


123.00 


6080 


10.00 


8737/5894B 


55.10 


6083/AX9909 


89.00 


8807 


1000.00 


6098/6AK6 


14, 00 


8873 


260.00 


6115/A 


100.00 


8874 


260 . 00 


6146 


6.00 


8875 


260.00 


6146A 


6.50 


8877 


533.00 


6146B/8298A 


7.50 


8908 


12.00 


6146W 


14.00 


8916 


1500.00 


6159 


11.00 


8930/X651Z 


45.00 


6161 


70.00 
125.00 


8950 


10.00 


6291 






6293 


20.00 


6BK4C 


5.00 


6360 


4.00 


6DQ5 


4.00 


6524 


53.00 


6FW5 


5.00 


6550 


7.00 


5GE5 


5. 00 


6562/6794A 


25.00 


6GJ5 


5.00 


6693 


110,00 


6HS5 


5.00 


6816 


58.00 


5JB5/6HE5 


5.00 


6832 


22.00 


5JB6A 


5.00 


6883/8032A/8552 


7.00 


6JM6 


5.00 


6884 


46.00 


6JN6 


5.00 


6897 


110.00 


6JS6B 


5.00 


6900 


35.00 


5JT5A 


5.00 


6907 


55.00 


5KD5 


5.00 


6939 


15.00 


6K66/EL505 


5.50 


7094 


75.00 


6KM6 


5.00 


7117 


17.00 


6KN6 


5.00 


7211 


60.00 


6LF6 


6.00 


7289/3CX100A5 


34.00 


6106 


6.00 


7360 


11.00 


6LU8 


5.00 


7377 


67.00 


6LX6 


5.00 


7486 


75.00 


6ME6 


5.00 


7650 


250.00 


12JB6A 


6.00 


7843 


58.00 


"WE ARE ALSO 


LOOKING FO 


7868 
7984 


4.00 
12.00 


TUBES NEW/USED ECT." 


8072 


55.00 


WE BUY SELL 


OR TRADE 


8121 


50.00 






8122 


85.00 






8236 


30.00 






8295/PL172 


300.00 







NOTICE ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE I ! ! ! 1! ! ! ! i ! ! ! !! !! 1 ! ! ! ! ! !! I ! 111! ! ! 1 ! ! 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



(f|\I^^I|z electrof|ics 



73 Magazine • July, 1982 145 



Jf^ 



TEKTRONIX OSCILLOSCOPES 

MODEL 453 Porlablft 50 MHz 

DuaJ Trace. 

MODEL 453A Portable 60 MHz 
Dual Trace, 

MODEL 154 Portable 150 MHz 
Dual Trace. 

MODEL 454 A Portable 150 MHz 
Dual Trace, 

MODEL 4S5 Portable 50 MHz 

Dual Trace. 

MODEL 475 Portable ZOO MHz 
Dual Trace 

MODEL 475A Portable 250 MHz 
DuaJ Trace. 

MODEL 7514 Storage Oscilloscope 
with a 7A15A and a 7A16AN 11 Amplifier 
and a 7 B50 Time Base 

MODEL 57? D1 Storage Curve Tracer 
with a 1 77 adapter^ 

MODEL 577D2 Curve Tracer 
with a 177 adapter 

Tektronix Lab Cart Model 3 



PRICE 
SI 200.00 

$1 400.00 
SI 800,00 
S20D0.0O 
S 1800.00 
$2640,00 
$2940.00 

S35O0.0O 

$3233,00 

$2796.00 
$316.00 



S 650.50 

% 475.50 
PRICE 

S 675.00 
$ 750.00 
$1000.00 
$ 900.00 
$1000.00 

$ 495.00 
$ 775.00 
$ 79S.0O 
$ 375.00 

$1500-00 



MODEL 547 50 MHz Bench Scope. 

WithaiAl Dual Trace. 

With a 1A2 Dual Trace. 

With a VA4 Quad Trace 

With a 1A5 Differential. 

With a lA6Differen.tiai 

or with 1 of each above. 

MODEL 545 30 MHz Bench Scope 

with a CA Dual Trace. 

MODEL 545A 30 MHz Bench Scope 
with aCA DuaJ Trace. 



$ 722.50 

$ 637.50 

$ 872.50 

$ 722.50 

$ 612,50 
$1667.50 

$ 412.50 

$ 437.50 



MODEL 544 50 MHz Bench Scope 
With a CA Dual Trace 

MODEL 543 A 33 MHz Bench Scope 

withaCA Dual Trace 

HEWLETT PACKARD OSCILLOSCOPES 

MODEL IdOA Main Frame, 

MODEL laOE Main Frame. 

MODEL 181A Mail* Frame. 

MODEL ia2A Mair> Frame. 

MODEL 183A Main Frame. 

MODEL 180 SERIES PLUG-IMS 
1801 A Dual Trace 50 MHz. 

l803ADjfferer}tial. 

1804 A Quad Trace 50 MHz 

1807ADualTrac.e50MHz 

1815ATDR/Sarnpler with a 1616A DC to 4 
GHz. 

1821 A Time Base & Delay Generator. 

1822A Time Base S. Delay Gerierator. 

1B31A Direct AccessSOO MHz/ 

ia40A Time Base & Deiay Generalor. ' 

1841 A Time Base & Delay Geinerator,* 
■For 183A Only. IMhN! 

TELEQUIPMENT MODEL D83 Oscilloscope 

Dual Trace Portaoie 50 MHz. Witti a V4 and S2A Plug-In 

DUMONT MODEL 1062 OscJHoscope 

Dual Trace 65 MHz portabie. 

TEKTRONIX 

MODEL RM565 Dual Beam Oscilloscope 

10 MH? with a 3A6 Dual Tface and a 3A72 Dual Trace. $1107.50 

MODEL 549 Storage Oscilloscope 

Bench 50 MHz with a CA Dual Trace $1000.00 

MODEL 647A Oscilloecope 

Bench 100 MHz with a 10A2 Dual Trace 

and a 1 1 82 A Time Base, Si 200.00 



1 



s 
s 

$ 
s 
$ 



495.00 
525.00 
200.00 
450.00 
875.00 



$1200.00 



$ 7S0.O0 



ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS 
DEFECTIVE MATERIAL: All claims for defective material must be made within sixty (60) days after receipt of 
parcel. All claims must include the defective material (for testing purposes), our invoice number, and the date 
of purchase. All returns must be packed properly or it will void all warranties. 

DELIVERY: Orders are normally shipped within 48 hours after receipt of customer's order. If a part has to be 
backordered the customer is notified, Our normal shipping method is via First Class Mail or UPS depending on 
size and weight of the package. On test equipment it is by Air only, FOB shipping point. 

FOREIGN ORDERS: AH foreign orders must be prepaid with cashier's check or money order made out in U.S. 
Funds, We are sorry but C.O.D. is not available to foreign countries and Letters of Credit are not an acceptable 
form of payment either. Further information is available on request. 

HOURS: Monday thru Saturday: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

INSURANCE: Please include 25^ for each additional $100.00 over $100.00, United Parcel only. 

ORDER FORMS: New order forms are included with each order for your convenience. Additional forms are 
available on request. 

POSTAGE: Minimum shipping and handling in the US^ Canada, and Mexico is $2.50 ail other countries is $5.00. 
On foreign orders include 20% shipping and handling. 

PREPAID ORDERS: Order must be accompanied by a check. 

PRICES: Prices are subject to change without notice. 

RESTOCK CHARGE: If parts are returned to MHZ Electronics due to customer error, customer will be held 
responsible for all extra fees, will be charged a 15% restocking fee, with the remainder in credit only. All returns 
must have approval. 

SALES TAX: Arizona must add 5% sales tax, unless a signed Arizona resale tax card is currently on file with 
MHZ Electronics. All orders placed by persons outside of Arizona, but delivered to persons in Arizona are sub- 
ject to the 5% sales tax. 

SHORTAGE OR DAMAGE: All claims for shortages or damages must be made within 5 days after receipt of 
parcel, Claims must include our invoice number and the date of purchase- Customers which do not notify us 
within this time period will be held responsible for the entire order as we will consider the order complete. 

OUR 800 NUMBER IS STRICTLY FOR ORDERS ONLY 
NO INFORMATION WILL BE GIVEN. 1-800-528-0180. 



146 73Magaiine • July, 1982 



FAIRCHILD 

9SH90OC 
95H91DC 
11C90DC 
1tC9lOC 
11C06DC 
11C05DC 

11C01FC 

B2S90 



11C24DC 



1 1 C44DC 



VHP AND UHFPRESCALER CHIPS 

350MCPTascdlerdivJde&y 10/1 1 

350MC Prescafer divide by 5/6 

650MC Prescaler dtvrde by 10/1 1 

650MC Prescaler divide t>y 5/S 

UHF Prescaler 750MC D Type Flip Flop 

1GHz Counter Divide by 4 

(Regular price $75.00) 

High Speed Dual 5/4 input NO/NOR Gate 

Preseilabie High Speed Decade/Binary 

Counter used wtfh ihe 1 1C90/9T or the 

95Hgo/9l Prescaler can divide by 100. 

(Srgnetics) 

Ttiis chip is the same as a Motorola 

MC4024M324 Dual TTL Voltage Control 

Multivibrator. 

This Chip is the same as a Motorola 

MC4044W344 Phase Frequency Detector, 



PRICE 

$ 8.50 

6.50 

15.50 

15.50 

12.30 

60.00 
15.40 



HEWLETT PACKARD 
MIXERS MODELS 

Frequency Range 

Input/Output Frequency L & R 



Mixer Conversion Loss (A) 

Noise Performance |SSB) (A) 

(B) 
PRICE 



10614A 

2MHz to 500MC 

200KHZ to 

500MC 

DC to SOOMC 

7dB 

9dB 

7dB 

9dB 

U9m PRICE 



105149 

2MHz to 

500MC 

200KHZ 10 

500MC 

DC to 500MC 

7d& 

9dB 
7dB 

9dB 
$39 99 



5,00 

3.37 

3.37 



GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. GUNN DIODE MODEL Y 2157 

Freq. Gap (GHZ) 12 to 18, Output (Min,) lOOmW. Duty (%) 
CW. Typ, Bias (VdcJ aO. Type. Oper. (MAdc) 550, Max Thres. 
(mAdc) 1000. Max. Bias (Vdc} lO.a $39.9t 

VARIAN GALLIUM ARSENIDE GUNN DIODES MODEL VSX^32aiS5 
Freq. Coverage 8 to i2.4GHz. Output (Min^ lOOmW, Bias 
Voltage (Max.) 14vdc. Bias current (nrtAdc) Operating 550 Typ. 
750 Max., Threshold 550 Tup. 1000 Max. $39.99 

VARIL Co. Inc. MODEL 53-43 AM MODULATOR 

Freq. Range 60 10 150MC, Insertion Loss l3dB Nominal, 
Signal Port imp 50ohms Nominal, Signal Port RF Power 
+ lOdSm Max.. Modulation Port BW DC to 1KH2L Modulation 
Pom Bfas 1 n^a. Norn ma I. $24.99 



FAEQUENCY SOURCES, ]NC MODEL MS 74?( 

MICROWAVE SIGNAL SOURCE 

MS-74X; MectianicaJly Tunable Frequency Range (MHz) 10630 to 

11230 (10.63 to 11.23GH2) Minimum Output Povver ^mW) 10. Overall 

Muitiplier Ratio 108, Internal Crystal Oscillator Frequency Range 

(MHZ) 98.4 to 104.0, Maximum Input Current (mA) 400. 

The Signal source are designed for applications where high stability 
and low noise are of prime concern, these sources utilize fundamen* 
tal transistor oscilJators with high Q coaxial cavpties, followed by 
broadband stable step recovery dtode multipliers. Th<s desigr> 
allows single screw mechanical adjustment ot frequency over stan^ 
dard communications bands. Broadband sampling circuits are used 
to phase lock the oscillator to a high stability reference which may 
be either an internal self contained crystal oscillator^ exlernal 
primary standard or VHF synthesizer. This unique technique allows 
for oplimrzation of both FM noise and long term stability Lrst Price 
is $1155.00 (THESE ARE NEW) Our Price— $289. 



AVANTEtC CASCADABLE 
MODULAR AMPLIFIERS 



M ode r UTO^504 UTO 51 1 



Frequency Range 




5 to 500 MHz 


5 to 500 MHz 


Gain 




&d8 




15dB 


Noise Fcgure 




lldB 




2.3dBto3dB 


Power Output 




+ t7d8 




- 2dB to 
-3dB 


Gain Flatness 




IdB 




IdB 


Input Power Vdc 




+ 24 




+ 15 


mA 




100 




10 




PRICE 


S70 00 


PRICE 


$75.00 



HEWLETT PACKARD 1N5712 MICROWAVE DIODE 

This diode will replace the MBOiOl, 1N5711. 5082-2800. 

5082-2835 ect. This wHi work itHe a champ in all those 

Down Converter projects. $1.50 or 10/$10.00 

MOTOROLA MHWt172R LOW DISTORTION 
WIDEBAND AMPLIFIER MODULE. 

Frequency Range: 40 to 300 MHz , Power Gain at 50MHz 

I6,6min. to I7.4max., Gain Ftatness ±0.1 Typ. ±0,2 

Max, dB., DC Supply Voltage - 28vdc, RF Voltage Input 

+ 70dBmV PRICE $29.90 

GENERAL ELECTRIC AA NICADS 

Model #41B905HD11-G1 

Pack of 6 for S5.00 or 60 Cells, 10 Packs for S45.00 

These may be broken down to individual cells. 

ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS 

TERMS: DOMESTIC: Prepaid, C.O.D. of Credit Card 

FOREIGN; Prepaid only, U.S. Funds— money order or cashier's check only. 

C.O.Dj Acceptable by telephone or mail Payment from customer will be by cash, money order or cashier's 
Check. We are sorry but we cannot accept personal checks for C.O.D/s. 

CONFIRMING ORDERS: We would prefer that confirming orders not be sent after a telephone order has been 
placed. If company policy necessitates a confirming order, please mark "CONFIRMING" boldly on the order 
If problems or duplicate shipments occur due to an order which is not properly marked, customers will be 
held responsible for any charges incurred, plus a 15% restock charge on returned parts, 

CREDIT CARDS: WE ACCEPT MASTERCARD VISA AND AMERICAN EXPRESS. 

DATA SHEETS: When we have data sheets in stock on devices we do supply them with the order. 




gM"^ 



master charge 

tH| IffttnVHH C**D 



ViSA 





elecCroqicjii 



m'48 



(602) 242-3037 
(602)242-6916 

2111 W. CAMELBACK ROAD 
PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85015 

Toll Free Number 

800-S26-0180 
(For orders only) 



r'See List ot Adtenisers on page 114 



73 Magazine • July. 1982 147 



mH 



ramsa^ the first name in Counters ! 



PRJCES 

CTW V'lred I vtv ■mwrmKy. U J5,fl J 

rtiiij' Wi3i 

Aid«p4Er'CfciirpT 11.9^ 
CJV J, Mkco pawer Overt 

timp hut 44.9^ 

E*l*fn*l Lime hill* inpul |4*4 



9 DIGITS 600 MHz 



The CT'90 is tht most verstttLe, feature packed counter available for less 
thAfi SSW.OO! Advanced desig^i features bclude; three selectable gate tinier 
nine digits, g:3t« indicator and a unique display hokl functicTi which holds the 
displayed courti after the inpuT ajgnal \s removed! Also« a 1 OmHz TCXO time 
base i£ used which enables easy ^^robeat calibration checks against WWV, 
Optional)': an interna] nicad battery pack. external time bai^e input and Micro- 
pdwer high stability crystal oven iime base are available. The CT-90» 
^rformance you can counl 021! 



$129^ 

^ '^-' WIRED 



SPECIFICATlONSc 



Rangi;: 


20 Hz to 600 MHz 


Sensitivity: 


Less than 10 MV to 150 MHe 




Less than 50 MV to 500 MHz 


Resolutioa^ 


O.j Hz 00 MMzranje) 




L0H£(60 MHz range) 




10.0 Hz (600 MHzrAn^ej 


Display: 


9 digilsO.4" LED 


Time bflse; 


Standards 10,000 niHi, LO ppm 20-40''C. 




Optional Micro- power ovenJDl ppm 20-40"' G 


Power 


«-15 VAC@ 250 in* 



7 DIGITS 525 MHz 



fiPFrTFICATmN& 



Range: 
Sensitivity: 

Resolution: 



Disptay: 
Time bases 
Power 



20 Hz to 5 25 MHi 

Less than 50 MV to 150 MHz 

Less XhMJi 1 50 MV io 500 MHz 

1.0 Hz (3 MHiranse) 

10.0 Hz (50 MHz range) 

100.0 Hz 1 5 00 MHz rang^i} 

7 digits 4" LED 

i;0 ppm TCXO 20-40X 

1 2 VAC ^' 250 ma 



WIRED 



The CT-70 breaks ihc pftce barrier <m \tb quality frequency counters 
Deluxe features audi as, three frequency ranges - each with pre- an:)plirication, 
dual Jieleetable ^te time^. and gate activity indication make m^eajurements a 
snap. The wide frequency rajige enables yuu to accurately measure signals 
from audio thni UHF with 1 .0 pptti accuracy ■ that's. OO0l%f The CT-70 is 
the answer to all your measurement nee<ifi, in the field lab or hem shack. 



PRICES; 



CT-7CI wired, 1 year warranty 
CT-70 Kit. 90 day parts war- 
ranty 

AC-1 AC adapter 
fiP-l Nicad pack + AC 
adapte [[/charger 



S99,95 

84,95 
3.95 

12,95 



7 DIGITS 500 MHz $7955 



PRICES! 

MINI- 100 wired, 1 year 

waoanty 

AC-Z Ac adapter for MINi- 

100 

fiP-Z Nicad pack and AC 

adapter/ charge r 



Hefe's a handy, general purpose counter that provides most counifr 
functions at an unbelievable price. The MINI-lOO docsn^t have the full 
frequency range or input impedance qualities found in higher price units^ but 
fbr basic RF sipal measurements^ \i can't be beati Accurate measurements 
can be made from I MHz all the way up to 5 00 MHz with excellent sensitivity 
throughout the range, and the two gate times let you select the resolution 
desir^ Add the nicad pack option and the MINI- 100 makes an idledl addition 
t£i your tool box for "in-therfielcf' frequency checks and repairs. 



WIRED 



SPECIFICATIONS^ 



RAnge: 

Sensitivity; 

ReKoJulion: 

Display 
Time base: 
Power: 



I MHz to 500 MHx 
Less than 25 MV 
1 00 Hz { slow gate) 
LO KHz (fast gate) 
7 digits. 0,4' LED 
2.0 ppm 20^40* C 
5 VDC # 200 ma 



8 DIGITS 600 MHz $159 




WIRED 



>* 



^•M*^ 



SPECIFlCATlQNSi 



Range: 


20 Hi 10 60O MH2 


Sensitivity':: 


Less than 25 mv to 150 MHz 




Less thai5 1 50 mv to 600 MHz 


Resolution: 


1.0 Hz (60 MHz range) 




IQ.O Hi(600 MHz range) 


Displays 


& digits 0.4" LED 


Time base: 


2.0 ppm 20-40 C 


Power 


1 10 VAC OT 1 2 VDC 



The CT-50 is a versatile lab bench counter that will measure up to 600 MHz 
with S digit precision. And, one of its best features is the Receive Frequency 
Adapter, which turns the CT-50 into a digital readout for any receiver. The 
adapter is easily programmed for any receiver and a simple connecbion to the 
receiver's VFO is all that is required fcRrtiae. Adding the receiver adapter in no 
way limits the operation of the CT-SO, the adapter can be conveniently 
switched on or off. The CT-SO^ a counter that can work dk>uble-duty! 



PRICES; 

CT-50 wired, 1 year warranty 
CT-50 Kit, 90 day parts 
warranty 

RA-1, receiver adapter kit 
RA-l wired and pre- program- 
med (send copy of receiver 
schematic) 



S159.95 

119.95 
14.95 



29,95 



DIGITAL MULTIMETER $99^ 




WIRED 



PRICES. 




DMrlOO wimti 1 year warranty 


$9995 


DM- 700 Kit, 90 day parts 




warranty 


79.95 


AC-I, AC adaptor 


3.95 


BP 3, Nicad pack +AC 




adapter/ charger 


19,95 


MP-3. Probe kit 


2.95 



The DM-700 offers professionil quajity performance ^i a Kqbbyisi price: 
Featured include;, 26 different ranges and S functions, a.11 arranged in a 
convenient, cafv to use format. Measurements are di^lsyed on a large VA 
difjt, ^ inch LED readout with autoTnatU: decimai placement, automatic 
polaTlTV, ovvrranije indicjition and overload protection up to 1250 volts 00 all 
T^n ^, mat inf{ i f V imiall y gaof-proofl The DM - 700 looks Rreat , a handsom c, 
jet bl^ckp ru^ed ABS case with convenient retr^table tilt bail makes it an 
ideal add [t ion to any shop. 



SPECIFICATIONS; 


DO AC volts: lOOuV to I KV, 5 ranges 


DO AC 




Current 


0.1 uA to 2.0 Ampsv 5 ranges 


Resistance: 


0.1 ohms to 20 Megohms, 6 ranges 


Input 




impedance: 


10 Megohms, DC/ AC volts 


Accuracy: 


Oa% basic DC volts 


Power 


4 'C cells 



AUDIO SCALER 



Forhigii resolution audio measurements, multiplies 
UP in frequency. 

• Great for PL tones 

• Multiplies by 10 or lOO 

• 0.01 Hz resolution! 

$29,95 Kit S39.95 Wired 



ramsey ekectrnnic's, inc. 



ACCESSORIES 

Telescopic whip antenna - BNC plug $ 7,95 

High impedance probe, liglit loading , . . . ...,.,.., n 1^-95 

Low pass probCf for audio measurements , . . , t . r^ --— - — - vr :-- - ^5.95 

Direct probe, generai purpose usage — , 12,95 

Tilt baiL forCT70, 90. MINHOO..... 3.95 

Color burst calibration unit, calibrates counter 

against color TV signal. ..... ^ , ,..,,., 14.95 



COUNTER PREAMP 

Ft^r measurine cxrremelv weak signals from 10 to 1,000 
MHi. Small siie. fjoivered Ihy pluji trans fcsrrntr'includetl. 

• Flat 25 dbgain 

• BNC Connectors 

• Great for snifTmg RF with pick-up loop 

$34.95 Kit S44.95 Wired 




2575 Baird Rd. Penfield. NY 14526 ^^^ 



PHONE ORDERS 
CALL 716-586^3950 



]_J_U_S.1_S 'tatatoKl'tin guafarnoed e^omirt* to« '0 dor^ 'I '>&f pi* sued 
rvFi, 1^ m o-f-Qiiiol lorm foe '•(L»id A4d 1 -^ \%it ihn^pn^g 
in^Li'Qnc B 'c o n^Qpi innuim O'l ) I' O v fT'^i'tii Qafl 1 ^ '''. COD add 
t7 0*d«rt ytidef $10 odd 11 ^0 Nlf r»s,.d*nH add ? »ai 



148 73 Magazine * July, 1982 




YOUP 



TRADE IN 

TRADE YOUR EQUIPMENT ON 

NEW or USED 



CALL TOLL 



3636 



FOR THE BEST DEAL ON: 



IGOM 



KENWOOD 



DRAKE 



TEN-TEC 



INFO^TECH 



COIJJNS 



v^HA/VlRAQiQCENl 

S340-42 Olive 8lvd.# P.O. Bok 28271 • St Louis. MO 63132 



MastAfCond 




VtSA 




73 Magazine • July, 1982 149 



SOCML EVENTS 



from page 78 

city Park Av«ntj«, N^m Orleans LA 70)10. 

FtAGSTAFF A2 
JUL 3&AU0 1 

Th« Amalttit Radio CouiKil &f Anjona 
wiM hold M&32nd anfkual hamle^t frpmUuty 
30 rhrcHigh August 1. 1962. at the Foft Tut- 
hill Fairgroijnds, jiist a fQi* mi^ south of 
1-40. FlAQStaft AZ Th«fe *ill be thousands 
ol doHg^ irt prizes, impfovod XYL actwltie?, 
3 swapf^st, a tran&m liter riunt, speak efs, 
forums, av^ards, exhibits, and efitettaiiv 
TTfefit on Frklay and SaturcKay nirghis. Over- 
nighl camping faciiui«$ wkw Iw availaiils. 
Talkm on 147.970/1 46 J70 For fun her irv 
formal ion, contact Win. OlJv«r Grieve 
VVTWGW, 4301 K 31 SI Avenue, Phoenix AZ 
85017, or call (903^246-0200 

KINGSFORD Ml 
JUL 31 AUG 1 

The Micli-A Qon ARC will tvold Itie 34ih 
anr^uai UP Hamfeat on Saiurday. July 31, 
and SurMiay, Aygusi 1, t9B2. at \hn Dicklrv 
son Courtly Armory on M-95, Kmg^iford Ml 
Ttcke^s are S2.50 at the door {no advanqe 
sales) and registration will begin ai 9:00 
am on both days. There will tse prizes, f am^ 
iiy activities, and a Saturday niffhl ban- 
quel. Advance banquet reservatioriiS are 
needed since aaating is limilad. Plant y of 
free pafking will be avaiiabit. Talk in on 
146.25/85 and .3&22. For further Informa- 
tion, wrii© UPHAWFEST.B2. 105 East Brel^ 
lung Avenue. Klngsford Ml 49801. 

ANGOLA IN 
AUG 1 

The Steuben Gounly Rariio Amateurs wilt 
hold ih^ 24tn annual FM Picnic and Ham^ 
Fesl qn Sunday, August 1, 1962. a I Crcxjkad 
Lake, Angola IN Admission is $2.50 There 
wHI be prizes, picnic-style BBQ chicken, In- 
side tables lor exhibitors and vendors, and 
Qvamighl camping. {A fee will be charged 
by county park;} Talk- in on 146.52 and 
147.eii21 

PITTSBURGH PA 
AUG 1 

The 45th annual South Htns Brass 
Pounders and Modulators Hamfeet will be 
held on August 1> 1962, from 1000 am to 
4^00 pm. at South Campus, Community 
College ot Allegheny County. Pittsburgh 
PA. Admiasion is S2.00 or 3 for S5.00. 
There will be computer, OSCAR, and ATV 
demon si rat ions, as lirell as a Ilea market. 
Talk In on 146 1 3/ 73 and 146.52. For fur^ 
ther in format I on. contact Andrew L Pa!o 
WA3PBa 1433 Schauffler Drive. West 
Hofneslead PA 15120 

ftELVIDERE IL 
AUGI 

The Big Ttiundef ARC will hold Its annual 
hamfest on Sunday, August 1, 19S2. at the 
Boone County Fairgrounds. Route 76. Belv^ 
defB IL Adfnis&ion is $2.00 in advance and 
12.50 at the gate. A fee will be charged lof 
B^teot tables and thef e will be indoor spece 
aiAilabfe in ttie exhibit build^riQ. as weil as 
outifoor space in swappecs' row. Sellers 
mk\ be able to set up Saturday evening or at 
T'^ am On Sunday Features win inciuije 
door prizes, a main pnza. food, and refresn- 



rnents. Campir>g will be available on Satur- 
day evening (there will be a charge for elec- 
tricityj. Talk4n on 146.52 and 147.975/ 
147.375. For further information or tickets, 
send an SAS£ to Jim Gximstsy, 416 Beacon 
Dnve, BelvidefB IL 61006. 

LEVELUND TX 
AUG 1 

The Hockley County Amateur l^dloCiob 
and the Noilhwesi Texas EmergerKy Net 
will hokJ their 17th annual picnic and swap^ 
fest on Sunday. August 1, 1962. beginning 
at B-iOO am at the crty park in LeveHar*d TX. 
Tlila event is for the entire family. Bhng 
your own ptcnic basket tor lunch at 12:30. A 
Iwo^ineler FM trarfsoetver is the grand 
pnze. A S3 00 regtstration is requested but 
not requ rred . Tttere wi 1 1 be ^wappi ng al I <lBy , 
with tatries provided. Talk-in on 2EiJBA. 

GLEN Ml 

AUG 1 

The Black River Amateur Radio Club will 
hold trie 29th annual Southwestern Michi- 
gan VHP Picnic on Sunday. August 1. 19S2, 
at the West Side County Park near Glen ML 
(Take exit 30 irom 1-196 and follow lt\t 
signs.) There will be swimming, a p]ay* 
ground, a small Ilea market, and door 
prizes There is no food available al ti>e 
park, so bring your own picnic t>a£keL Reg- 
istration is $1.00. For additional informa- 
tion, contact Ed Alderrrvan KiaZ, RH 1^, Bo* 
44, Lawrence Ml ^9064. 

POMONA CA 
AUG 7 

The Tri County Amateur Radio Associa- 
tion will hoid its annual hamfest/picnic on 
Saturday, August 7, 1982, from 7:00 arn to 
1:00 pm, al the Los Angeles County Fair- 
grounds, Pomona CA AH buyers, sellers, 
and computer buff s are welcome, There wit I 
be prizes, exhibits, and refreahments. Talk- 
in on 146.025/.S25. For more informallon, 
write loTCARA Hamfest Chairman W6ELZ, 
PO Bon: 142, Pomona CA 91769, 

JACKSONVILLE FL 
AUG 7-6 

The Greater Jacksonville Hamfest A^so 
elation wHI hold the annual Jacksonville 
Hamfest and Nonhern Florida ARRL Con- 
vention on August 7^, 1982. at tfie Orange 
Park Kennel CFub. located near the inter- 
section of 1-295 and US 17 iust south of 
Jacksonville. Advance registration Is $3.50 
and is availalite from Rofcterl J. Cutting 
W2KGL 1249 Cape Ct^ailes Avenue. Attars 
tic Beach FL 32233. iRegistration al the door 
Is $4.00. The FCC will admirifster amateur 
and commerctal radio operator eitams on 
Fwiay. August 6th, at tt>e hamfeel site. 
Those Wishing to take the exams stuculd ap- 
ply to the Atlanta FCC office as soon as 
PQi^tble. Swap tables are $t2JO0 per tal>ie 
for tioih days {no one-day tables) and tabkl 
raservafiOfiSv as welt as advan«^ ni0l9trft' 
tions, are available from An<ty Burton 
NX4G, 5101 Youngs ^k»d. Jacksonville FL 
3t^fi. A lutl slate of pfograms is sched- 
uled. alor>g with meetings of statewide and 
regional nets and otQaniialions. plus com- 
petitions Including a rabbit hunt anil plleup 
contest. The heaf)t|uarters fiotel is the Best 
Western First National Inn just across from 
ttie hamfest. Special rates may be obtained 
by wnting to Jim Canfiekl KD40Q. 996 



Dostie Circle, Orange Park FL 32073. Talk-In 
on 146.16^.76 and 146.07Ae7. 

SAUK nAPtOS MN 
AUG a 

The St, Cloud Rad»o Club will hold Its 
annual hamfest on Sunday. August 8. 
t9@2, ffom 3:30 am to 4.00 pm, at the Sauk 
Rapids Muntcipal Park, Sauk Rapids MN 
Talk-tn on 146, 34/, 94 For more intorma- 
tlon, contact MiKe Lynch, 2i tS-tst Street 
SL Cloud MN 56301. or call f6 12^251 2297 

M0HTG0MERYV1LLE PA 
AUG a 

The Mid-Atlantic Amateur Radio Cli& an- 
nounces its annual J. B, M. Hamfest to tse 
held on Sunday. August 6. 1962. from &00 
am to 4D0 pm, rain of shine. Taiigate ^lup 
begins at S;O0 am. Located af the Route 309 
Dttve-ln Theatef, 1f4 mile nortti of Route 63, 
Montgometyviile. PA (S miles rtodh of tfie 
Fort Washington Interchange of the Pwin- 
syfvania Turnpike). Admissi^^n: $2^, with 
Si. 00 additionaJ for each tailgate space. 
N(>n-ticens0d XYL^ afid chiklren admitted 
free. Ample parkirvg, refreshments, raffles, 
door prices, and more Talk4n on WB3JOE/FI 
(147,6&.06) or 146£2 simplex. For further tr^ 
formation, wrile trie clut>, PO Box 352, 
Villanova PA 19065. 

TACQMA WA 
AUG 14-15 

The Radio Club of Tacoma will hold 
Ham fair 82 on August 14 15. 1^2. at the 
PacHic Lutiieran University campus. Ta- 
coma WA Registration lsS5.00and dinner 
is S7 50. Actiyities will include lechnicel 
senninars, a flea market, commercial 
booths, an ARRL meeting, a repeater to- 
tum, a VHF tweak and tune clinic, prizes, 
raffles, and a loggers' breakfast. Taik-in 
on 147.8&/.a6. For more information, con- 
tact Grace Tei^zel AD7S. 701 So, 120lh.Ta- 
OOma WA 9M44. or phone {206h564-a347, 

WILMINGTON DE 
AUG 15 

Tt>e seventh annual t^ew Delmarva Ham- 
fest wili be held on Sunday, August 15, 
1932, from B:00 am to 4:00 pm at Gioryland 
ParH^ Bear OE (5 miles aoulh of Wilming- 
ton}. Admission is $2.25 In advance, ¥2,75 at 
the $ate. Tailgating Is $3,50. Limited tabies 
will be available under the pav^illon. but 
bring your own lo be sure. Food and drinks 
will be available. First prize is an Atari-' 
Home Video Game System, Talk-in on .52 
and .13^.53. For more information and a 
map, send an SASE to Stephen Momot 
K3HiP, 14 BaJ^am Road, WHmington DE 
19804, For advance tickets, make checks 
payable to Detmarva Hamfesf, inc 

TIOGA COUNTY PA 
AUG 21 

Ttie Tioga County PA ARC 6lti Annuat 
Amateur Radio H am test wi 1 1 be held on Sat- 
urday , August 21, 1962, from 0600 to 1600 at 
a new iocation at Island Park. |ust off US 
Rte. t5. Blo^sburg PA. Thefe wiiit lie a flea 
market, food, free camping, an auction, an 
HH door ph2e. etc Talk-in on .19^ 79 arvt 
SI. for moie information or advance tick- 
ets. wnte Tioga Co, ARC, PO Box 56. Mans^ 
field PA 1S933, or contact Paul Sando 
KC2AZ. 606 Reynolds Street. Eimira NY 
149£Mor* m79or.9&.36, 

MARVSVILLE OH 
AUG 21 22 

Ttte Union Couniy Amateur Radio Club 
will hold the MaiTsvtIie Hamfest on Satur- 
day afternoon and all ^ay Sunday. August 
21-22. 1962. at the fatrground in Marysville 
(near Columbus) OH. Admission *s $2.00 
in advance or $3 00 at the gate. Flea mar- 



ket space is $1.00. Food, beverages, and 
free overnight camping^ movies, and pop- 
corn will be availat^le Featured on Satur- 
day nighl will be a free square dance (with 
a live band) loltowed by a big country 
breakfast available ait night. Door prizes, 
ladies' programs, and ARRL, FCC, and 
MARS meetings will be featured On Sun^ 
day. Talk in on 146.52 and t4^.99^^9, For 
additional information, wrHO UCARC, 
t3613 US 36. Marysville OH 43040. or call 
(5l3)'644.^j46a- 

ST. CHARLES IL 
AUO^ 

The Fox River Radio League will host the 
Illinois State ARRL Convention in eoniunc- 
tion wtttt its annual hamfest both to be 
held on August 22. 1962. from 8:00 am to 
4:00 pm. at the Kane County Fairgrounds^ 
SL C^hartes IL Tickets are S2 00 in advance 
aod $3,00 at the gate. For advance lickets. 
send an SASE lo J, Dubeck KA9HQY, 1312 
Bluebeti Lane. Batavia IL6O510. Ttiere wilt 
be comrrverciai exhibits, a flea mafket, eon- 
tests, danonstratlons, forums^ prizes, and 
tK}t food. Talk-in on 146.94. Ejihibiiors. dea^ 
ersi^ and vendors should contact G. R. Isety 
WD9GIG. 736 Fellows Street, St. Charles IL 
60174. 

WEHTZVILLE HO 
AUG 22 

The St. Charles Amateuf Radio Club. 
Inc., will hold Hamfest 82 on August 224 
1982, at the Went^ille Community Cen* 
ter. Went^ille MO. Tickets in advance are 
St.OO each or 4 for $3, 00. at the door, they 
are S1 50 each or 4 for $5.00. A demission is 
SI. 00 per car. There will be prizes, con* 
tests, a fiea market, food, and air oondU 
lioned eKhibitions buildings. For tickets, 
motel and campmg information, priie 
lists, dealer reservations, etc., write 
SCABG Hamfest 82. dQ f^ike McCrann 
WDflGSY, 25 Elm StreeL St. Peters MO 
63376. 

JEWELL NJ 

AUG 29 

The Gloucester County Amateur Radio 
Club will hoid its fourth annual GCARC 
Ham^Compfesi on Sunday August 29^ 
1982. from 8:00 am to 3:00 pm at the 
Gloucesier County College, Tanya rd fload, 
Seweil NJ. Tickets are S2.O0 in advance 
and $2.60 at the door The tallgaters' and 
dealers' charge is SG.OO and includes one 
free admission. Doorswlliopenat 7:00 ann 
for setup. There will be speakers, semh 
nars. contests. FCC exams, and prices, in- 
cluding a Radio Shack TflS-80 computer 
and a Yaesu FT-208R. Talk in on 146,52 
and 147.7B/.1B. For more information, con- 
tact GCARC Hamfest Committee. PO Box 
370. Pitman NJ 06017. or phone <609M56- 
0500 or {609>'33a-484l (days) or t609>629- 
2064 (evenings)' 

BUTLER PA 
SEP 12 

The Builer County Amateur Radio Asso^ 
ciation wtll hold its annual hamfest on Sun^ 
day, Septemtter 12. 1982. from 9::00 am to 
4:00 pm, at the 8aU«r Farmatiow Grourids 
at Roe Airport, Butler PA. Flyin at Sutiet 
Farmsfww Airpoft- Admission is a $1 00 ttcK 
nation and children unde^ 12 wilt t>e admits 
led free Ovemight campers are welcome 
and food and refreshments will be avaif 
able. Ttiefe will be an indoor flea market 
fvendor space will be S3.00 per 3- foot tat>le), 
a free outside fiea market, free parking {in- 
cluding for the harKficappecf), and pri^es^ in- 
cluding a Kerwvood 1^-8305 HP transceiver. 
Talk-in Oil 14736/36. .52. and 147.84/_24 For 
additional information, contacl Leighlon 
Fenneli. Crestmont Drive, RD 6, Butier PA 
16001^ or phone (4l2|^8&9i22. 



150 73 Magazine • July, 1982 







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See Usf of Adveaisers on page T7^ 



73 Magazine • July, 1982 153 



fl 



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-ill 4-'r-r' fhat )nrFLH3?9 Ji W\Mm OvfHriter, 
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Fiigi<: i.omDiC'L ^ou-ndi ■ I'^-iji Includflm 
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(trtdii^d^rarTming gaamplDi Vnu car ajmi* 
fiffloii' duniTioia, Eitpta«torii. Slttm Triint. 
Wind A. Suf( and mii>cN rutno 
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Willi uiijihi'v PCfipBird'(U0K«billtBiy^ tphr \ 
T^T7 Chip li» Included 



ELECTRONIC MUSIC MAKEfl 



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NEW 

MORSEMATIC™ 
-2 KEYER 




NEW... $139,95 



THE MORSEMATIC KEYER BY 
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low you can get all the features of the world's first and $tltl best microcomputefizi 
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serial number generator In addition, the MM-2 comes complete with CMOS memory 
and provisions for internal memory keep afive battery. The MM-2 operates trom 
externa! 12 VOC at approximately 350 IVIa. 

ACCESSORIES: 

Model AC-1 000 Ma 12 VDC WaH Adaptor , . , . , $14,3S 

Model ME'2 Memory Expansion (2000 Total Morse Characters] ,....,. $39,95 

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. the best is now available in an improved form si a price you can afford. 

I PRfCES AND SPECIFICATIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 




catf or visit 



AEA 



Brings you the 
Breakthrough! 



Britt's 2-Way Radio 
Sales ft Service 

2508 Atlanta Street 

Smyrna, Ga. 30080 

(404) 432-8006 



i^l42 




73 Magazine does not keep subscrip- 
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Please send a description of the 
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this publication 
is QVQilobie in 
rmcrofofm 



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ii 



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300 NorlhZeeb Road 

Oepi. PR. 

Ann Arbor, Ml 46t06 

U.SA 



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Dept PR. 

London, VtfClR4E J 
EnQland 



PRESERVE 



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K{}ep your issues o1 73 Magazine together, handy 
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Allow 4 lo G weeks For daJlvery 



154 73Magazfne • July, 1982 



Call or Send for Free 



HiT^ii^ 



ELECTRONiC PARTS CATALOG 



Thousands of 

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QUADS TOWERS. 
TOWERS QUADS 

2, 3, 4 ELEMENT QUADS AND 
ALSO THE ^'Special" 40. pre- 
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are any amateur who owns a 
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up. WARC frequencies easily 
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TOWERS- 

Steel or Aluminum. Crank down 
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towers/quads. 

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Allow 30-45 days delivery 

Send for detailed brochure 



152 



CQ PRODUCTS 

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Fitting Are Molded Into Antenna 

80 or 40 Meter.. „„„. .....49.95 ea. 

20, 15. or 10 Meter ..„_.. 44.95 ea. 




CiowGP g8in sysieoas 



□ Payment enclo&ed S_ 
n VISA □ MC 

Card no. Exp, 

S Ifl nai um 



dale^ 



H\M 



t007 Cnv^s .« 

Wesi *Nm», U 7t39T 



.Stafe_ 



Take your favorite HX out 
for a drive tonight. 



VISA or MASTERCARD for 
same day shipment. 



For $69.95 you get the most efficient, 
dependable, fully guaranteed 35W 2 meter 
amp kit for your handy talkie money can buy. 

Now you can save your batteries by operating 
your H.T. on low power and still get out like a 
mobile rig. The model 335A produces 35 watts 
out with an input ol 3 watts, and 15 watts out with 
only 1 watt in. Compatible with IC-2AT. TR-2400, 
Yaesu, Wilson & Tempo! Other 2 meter models are avail- 
able with outputs of 26 W and 75W. in addition to a 100W 
am plif ier k it for 430M HZ. ^3^ 

Communication Concepts Inc. i^S^SST*" '*^'^''"''''° 



•••••• 



A STAR IS BORN 



*****# 



P 



# Ideat for Novi<^(^, SWL*( 
and reasoned amatRurs 
Bailt-in cod« practice 

oicillator & speakfir 
12 VDC Operation of 
t20 VAC with sdapter 
provided 
OpiionaJ serial -^para I te* 
ASCII output port 
A code reader so advanced 
COOE*STARTMKIt . . , . 
CODE* STAR Wir«d . . , . , 
Optlonat ASCJI Outpui Port 
Optiortat ASCII Oiitr>ut Port 




i 

^^ hanoimg tor coniineni 



I 



\\ costs you i#ssi Call or 



tIt Copies Morse, Baudot 
& ASCti codfii 

'^ Two opiimized Morsi} 
rangei 

ik Digital & Ana tog fii'tefing 
with l&db AGO 

it Atit omat re speed 1 ractc ifii} 
3 _ 70 WPM 

for brochure or ord«r dtrecL 

• , , , CSF ^23^,95 

CS-IK S 59,95 



Kit Wired 
(Specify 1 10 or ^00 Baud arid 20mA or TTL levej} .,..,**.,.. .CSIF f 79,95 

end check or money ofder. Use your VJSA or MasterCard. Add S5,00 shipping and 
handling for continental U.S. Wisconsin residents add 4% State Sales Taic, 

Corporation Telephone: 1414} 241-8144 

P. O. Box 51 3G, TKiinsviUe, Wisconsin 53092 



See L/sf ol Advertisers on page 114 



73 Magazine • July, 1982 155 




FULL LINE ALL PARTS & COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



P.O. Boi 4430M 

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Writ caHs: 2322 Walsh Ave. 

(408) 988^^640 

S^me day itispinini RrM lint tnds a% fidDfy tnM. GuarvTteKt 
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4116 2mn^ Dynamic HAM I^StA.DO 



Afifits Peripheral Kilt 

SERIAL 1.0 INTERFACE to 30,000 baud. 

T R . Inpui & ouiiMJl from monrtor or bssjc. oi 

use Apple 35 intelli Off nT terminjj. Bd cmJ^ |P^ 2)' 

S14.SS. KH (P N 2A) S51.2$« Assenn&M |P.N 

2C| Sfil.95. 

PflffTOTYPlMG BBAAe |P N 7907J 121.95 

FIIRALLfL TRIAC OUTPUT &OA^D i trttCS. 

eacfi can swndi iiOV. eA loads, Bd ofily {Pit 

?10) Sim. Kit (P H 210A) Silt .5S. 

APPLE H GAME I^EHJLlSAdam and Eve S38.00 

SfRlALPARALLEL INTERFACf Bidireaianai 
Baud rat^ from 110 ^ )^-2K, sw ssiecrabt^ 
pd^ariiy of input and surpar strote. 5 to 8 data 
bits. 1 or 2 slop bus, parity odd or even or none, 
all characters canlain a %W\ bit. ^S & 12V 
required Bd only {P/N 1011 *11.i5. Kii (P/N 
1D1A}|4Z.S9. 

RS'23Z;'TT^ INTERFACE Bidirfi^tionat, re- 
qijlies -12V, Kti i?m 232A) 13,95. 
HS232'20fnA INTERFACE Bidiretlional. 2 
passive opiQ- isolated ciJtLils, Kit (P^N 7901 A) 
114.35. 

PROM Eraser 

WM erase 25 P^iOMs m 1 S rnmut^ UHraviDlct 
assembled 2S PBOtI cap^Ply 137.50 iwiin 
1 1im«r |«9 501 5 PROM opaoty OSHA.UL ver- 
son $83 00 Iwith timei 1119.00). 

180 MicroProf€SSdr $149.00 

SinoteboafO csmputar Lonmg. reaching, pro- 
EfHyping. 2K RAM. My^aM. ifepliys; ^^^tutt 
interface T^ny BASIC $19.11. All tytly 
^ssnbded. 



Z80 Microcomputer Kil $69,00 

?6 bit I/O. l mi cfocK, 2if-, HAU, RDM Buead- 
boifO space ExceHehT lor cofitfoi Bat? Bpartf 
S2t.5D. FuM Kil S79,D0. l^onitDr |20 00. Power 
Supply Kit %^BM TViv Ba^ic S30.0O. 

Modem Kit S&O.Oil 

St^e cil tr.t di I . <:r>^ , vts^Mr No lungig nece^ 

iCOii34ic coirpler p^ns tnduded E(i onlf 
$17 00 Artide in June, Juty, Aug ftstfio 
f'ecjyttns, 19fl1. 

60 Hz Crystal Time Base Kil S4.40 

CcKtveris digital dodts Irom AC Nne t^ntienty to 
crysial trme base, Outsi^irHling ffipjracy 

Video Modulator Kit $3J5 

CoTiven TV set intQ a htofi (^uyilty rriqnilor w.'d 
affecting L^sage. Camp, kJt w.i'lulf instruc 

Mulli volt Computer Power Supply 

av Samp, 3:i8v .& amp. 3v 15 amp, -5v 
El amp. 12v .5 arnp. 1?y option ±5v, jl12v 
fire regu:lated. Basic Kit 05J5. Kii with ct>assis 
and alffiardware $51.95. .Ajd $5 00 shipping) Kit 
{}f lianlwHfi $1£.oa. WDOdQrain case S10.0I1. 
$1 50 sliipping 

lyjn-N-Talk by Volrax 

Ittl tp mmdi SfTtitmmf ^h unlimited vocabu- 
lary. buiMi tsct to SQSKh iigontlim. 70 to 100 
tms ptr soant speech wfihmim, RS232€ 
Bntvtm $3SBM. S^m^ 1C $7t.n. 

Dfred Connect Modem S99.00 

Origaniwcf. t03 edft)|>iliOle. 9V baltertr 02 
wallpdig. 



INTRODUCING A BRAND NEW MICROCOMPUTER 



VEliTURE IS a siagls 
tioafd tornpuier tt^ is an 
adwimire Ix ttie hobCiy^ H 
E J liiiTwig. training oom- 
fKier ai wai it lust plain lyn 
fbr anyonv ^Atio wHits to Qei 
9ilD a stalKif-The^aft com- 
putof at reasonabte cost. 

VENTURE comes itj ((it 
torm or luir^ 3$sem!3f«t anet 
tested, ^u can get it m its 
rnlntmufTi Cjorrtigurslion For 
as Jitlle as $195.00 or take it aH ttie way tu i"i|i[iy 
disiis and voice. \{ can be expand &[t bs a i(it or Pully 
as&eimbted, at your own pace ^rd dK3ic:&. 

VENTURE l5 3 16" by 20" main board witt> 
separata ASCJI and HEX keyisoairJs It mns, fast. 
alnx!Sl 4 MHz. and ha& tti« capabilrty qf pulling 
^mosi 1 megabyte of RAM amt ROM on tfie board 
ailing with a variety of inexpen^ve (3pflD«is 

A l&flianne{ analog4Hf|iai converter aUowis 
use of ioy$tidis, centrot hinctiQis, nstninMnte- 
t*on. lemptrature setrsmg. etc. Tt spund 
a^neratpr. s^ttware controlled misic, Vbtras 
wee synthesner and i«ai time dodt catondar add 
to its versabMy 

A ^andard GOim tvs iviih 5 Stots, pafaiH 
pdfts and 2 ssnai pofb wttn M loncyiltiig (75 
to 9600 B/^0) alto«r eipsisbn irrto (Soppy dfsfcs, 
cobr.EPROM pnagr^mmflr. pffntir, modefTi ol your 
dtoics. Later m^tmsm «il add a Kgtn pen^ a 
Lirv-versaf user proetrartmabte rmsic sourid tJOSfd. 
'.vi'-r^eral Purpose Instrument Bljs„ and a fugti 
resaiution colar/grkiyscate pijtet mapped video 
board 

VENTURE connects directly to a montlof or to 
your TV set tin rough m RF modulator. And now lor 
Itie heart of VENTURE ... its vwleo dlRplay, VEN- 
TURE \m^ s high cEsoiution prograininable vtdao 
display with up to 4096 ustir-dertined charadsrs. 
aipiufiumeric ^rmtiois. special graflHes &/ ob- 
teds. suGt^ as spaoe ^ips. etc Each character Is 
B ptnfe widft by 15 posls high, with 2 grayscale 



Wiennjre 




maps: A h^ B4 levels ol 
giayscale plus video in- 
MiVWf^^iRVif and IkUbti 
Knen igxtiai lor a "sncmr 
Nie dtspUy. The HEfiat ts 
S^2 X 513 pbeet ni^Sped wrtti 
2 planes of mlco RAM per 
display VENTURE vid^ is in 
^\^n astounding! 

VFNTUIIE has complete 
so 1 1 w^ re support with luH 
BASIC, 3 ROM monitors. 
disassembler/a&sembier^itof. It will run nejil- 
Ume video games, all RCA chip 8 firograms and all 
currefit Quest 1&02 software VENTURE DOS will 
accommodatE up to three SVj" double densrty 
floppies A ojmplQle 1802 programming book is 
available Alt «ffitons of VENTUF^ ai* shippefl 
with a set d maftuais wrihefi to tie ur>il?fstood by 
the in B ^ we noed a&wttti ^acpefienoed user 
O ff Pwril QpHlQi 
IE chomeiA Id D; 5 slot 60 pin tus. 2 s^ 

pom, pvaiN pom: J video opttRc. 4aK a^^' 

Votrax voic« Synth esirtr. sound gentftlor, 
EPfDM; nn BASIC di&sasseo«ler, iefttf. assem- 
ble, m^l catMiet iddiional po a ar supply. 
A^l teybcKnl f^ timi dock ^knSx, 
^M^fa^m Otrttfifr^ 

W:.. iM prog ramnw, f{^ pen. 

univ^efsai user pro^ramnidile muslG, sound board 
high Fssoiution color, gray^cate pwel rr^apped 
wdeo board. General Purpose Instrument Bus. 
Wlnlmum VINTURE SyHwi S195.00 
Kit inclydes CPU and HinErQi witfi 4K oi RAM, IK 
ol scratchpad, 2K monitor 1861 video graptiics, 
cassette inkflfticQ and ^parptie HEX k^bosrd 
with LEO tJisplavs tor address and output. Power 
supply IS inclu(tea ^lung wlih 2 game cassettes. 
The main Ijoard is 1 6'* x ^O" and includes space tor 
aU of ths previously di&cu&sed on-bciani options. 
Full on-board expansioin can be compielBd tm 
under $1000 00 CHI Iw further deiails, opttan 
prices, ^t 



RCA Cosmac 1802 Super Elt Ckiniputer $106J5 



The Super Ei is 1 irensNkiis lOiui tf it comtoiia 
wdeo. ioU dls^brsv IB) dispb^. inif muic, 

^ on a sir0e tmd tr $tOG.95. 

The $«fper Elf f9ip««ion capAiiy i$ wfea% tm- 
KmitH] and you qiy dp i noqiefismly one step A 
a ivne bqansion ifjciudes cassRe meerf^ice addh 
Irona! memory, c^lor wteo, Basic, ASCII l<«y^ 
tjoard. pnnter. floppy. S-100 bus, RSZ32, etc 

The Sopw Ell comes compfete with pow^r supply 
-^?:i'^ detailed 1?7 patge mstnjction manortl which 
includes m^^ 40 pages of sotrwrire, including a 
series Of lessons to ti«ip get you ^tart^ and a 
music prognam and graphics targeft gani& Marty 
schools ianri universities are using the Super Ell as 
a cDur&a ol study. OEM's us^e it tor training and 



B&D A moiMy neii^letter Questtl^^ dnotad 
eidieMy ID soitwvi br lie Si^ B and ihetc 
am mmy sohware ticoics .iwrtiie ai low o^ 

TheSu|KrBlo(ri4Mi¥ef systeriiisiiciwaHaitAis s^ 
a series of b^ie boards as w^ as tuil Idts jrid 



Super E?1 S35.00 Super Eixpa^s^ 
$35.tW Powtfr Supply $10. {)0 S-100 Color 
$35.00. (}ynaniic HAM $441.00. Msmmte $1Q.0Q. 
Super Basic %^M. 

Free 14 Pago Bmcliure 

Send or caEI for a free brochure on aH 

details and pricing of Iha Super Elf and its 
expansion. Wa will qd it r^gh[ out to ycu! 



Quesi Super Basic V5 J 

A new i!nhancfd version cf Supef Basic now 
available OuesI was the first cornpany wortdwide 
rp ship a lull Si2e Base lor 1102 Syst^s A 
complete tbncrion Sqlif inic by Ron Ctllif 
mduding lloiUfig poinl c^»bthty wilti ^Cteintilc 
nt^ipn ^mjmtor range - l7P*l.32bilni«oer 
±2fiiiion.fngttid*n^ays. smog irr?|fs. siring 
maflKMjiatioii eassetife tO. s^veaad toad, baiie. 



data and mathjf)* language prognms. and ovei 
75 siatements. lundions And operaijons 
New rmproved daslet venion mdudmo re- 
i HMBl i tf anft essentiaittv imltmHed irariaDtes 
$isxi SI exclusive user cjipviaabte cunyridnu 

StSfM and PafaM 1 rpirtin«$ tfidud^ 
Super Basic on CKseHc (45 DO. 



RoGlwell AIM 65 Compuler 
650$ t>ased 5¥tgle ixnni liili tuui^il keyboanj 
and 20 cfiUim ttUfffHl prmta: 20 char ^tpnanu 
meric dt^play BOM manior, fulty expartdable 
|4lf,DQ. 4K version $431.00 4K Assembler 
ll^M. BK Basic Inierprgt^r £59.00 

Speaal small powsr supply &v gA 24V 5A 
issfim In Irame SSS.DO. Maided pt^sfic 
fiodo^ure 10 fit both AIM €S and pDWi^r supply 
$52.50. Alh4 65 1K in cabinet with power suppty, 
switch, fuss, cord a£S?m S54G.0O, IK $565.00. 
A6&^40^5000 AIM es4fl w. I^K RAN and monllDr 
11295.00. \\m Board Kit (16K. %\m {.m. 
S?151 VD640 Video inJertace Kh llia.tB. A&T 
%U%m Complex AIM e& tn thin tfmsm with 
power supp^ 1307. DD. Special PadQjp Ffige' 4K 
AIM m aasc. power supp^. cdMflmV.OO 

A^ fi&IOM/SYM'Siiper Bf 44 pii eKpansaon 
bE^fd board witfi 3 cmnedors %31M. *Smd 
nt coiNpivfei Bil iB ill Mil 



■jT . r^ 




E^l M Adapter Kil $24.95 

int^ Elf It pmvidino Sup3^ E1T 44 and 50 p: 
plus 3' too bus gsepansaofi. fWith Siiptr Ex- 
pimion} High and km address d»sp^. ^m 
w^ nwte LtD s optional SHW^ 



Super Color MOQ Video Kit imm 

■ ZS6 1 1^ fttgh resorutjon cDtor 

^ th alt de^»lay mode catnpuie'' 
y irappfll IK RAM Bi^nd' 
i:.^e to 6K S-100 bus 1802. aOOO, 8085. W. 
eic Oealeti; Stnd lor nteellei^ pfidn^ margin 
prugram. 



TERMS: $5.00 mm. order U.S. Fuitrfs. Cafft. resfilenls add %% lai. pnces 

$10.00 min. VISA and MasterCard accepted. $1.00 insurance optionaL subiect 
Shippino: Add 5%: orders under $25.00—10%. to E^hange 



FREE; Send for your copy ol our NEW 19B2 
QUEST CATALOG. Include SSc stamp, 



158 73 Magazine • Juiy, 1982 



RAMSEY 



ELECTRONICS 

" 62 lnc> 



PARTS WAREHOUSE 



We now have available a bunch ot goodres too 
good to bypass Items are Umited so order today 



2575 Baird Rd. 
Penfield, NY 14526 

716-586-3950 



MrNI KITS - YOU HAVE SEEN THESE BEFORE NOW 

HERE ARE OLD FAVORITE AND NEW ONES TOO. 

GREAT FOR THAT AFTERNOON HOBBY. 



FM 

MINI 

MIKE 




less m^^te kiV Transmtts a siibJe 
Signal up to 3O0 yirds with e^cep- 
tmnji Audio qualify by means oi its 
built m #l«<Tr«i miiie Kit trudiuam^ 
case JTi^iht. on-^lT SMrilci'i antenna, 
batlety and luper tnslruclJc^s Titis 
IS me itr^^i umi ivaiiatite 

ritfi.S Kit S14.9i 

F M 3 Wif Kl ana T«l«* l »-95 



Color Organ 

See music come 
aliye' 3 differenr 
ftghts flicker i^ith 
music One light 
each ^or, high, 
mid-rafige and 
lows Each indi- 
vidiiaFiy adjust- 
able and dinves up 
to 300 W ruris on 
110 VAC 

Complete Itrt, 
ML-T 
$S.t5 



Vli»*0 ModulptorKII 
Convnrlfii 4inv TV la vid'&Q mpnilAiT Sup^f 

sEjiMn !uri4bl« Gvet ch A-B Runs on 5- 
ISV icc*pTt*ifll vid&osFgnaf Be^Mifl^ton 
Ihs mflrJia[< Complfrfp kii, VO-t fT.Si 



Ud Blink y Kll 
A greal attentton get- 
ter which) iit|«rn3telv 
flashes 2 ]umba LEDs 
Use tQi nam« badgiK. 
buttons warfitng 
nnH tights, afiyth(ing< 
Huns on S to 15 votts 
Ctfnplfrte kit BL-t 
t2.ftS 




3tJp#r Sl«uth 
A sup^rspn^irivg ampli- 
her which WJil' pick up a 
pin drop si 15 feet^ Great 
tor monitonng baby s 
room Of as gen^fai pur- 
pose ampitlier Full 2 W 
rms outpuT furls on 6 to 
15 tfofts. i^es ft-45 ohm 

CQ«npl9ttkii aN-9 



CPO'1 

Runs on 3't3 Vdc t »aM t>i/f i KH^ opod tor QPO. 

Aii'm Audio Oscillatof CompJ^ip kif S$.9$ 




Call Youf Phone Order tn Today 
TERMS: Satisfaction gua:ranteed or moriey 
refunded COD add SZOO Minimum ofder 
S6 00 Drdef s u r^e r S 1 00 add S 1 SO Add 5 - 
for postage, insurance, handling Overseas 
add 15". N Y residents add 7% Ian 



CLOCK KITS 

Youf o4d favorllpi mrs here m^ain Ov«r 7,DCH)Si>ld to Data. 
Be on«i Qt fh« gang and orc(«r youri today! 

Try your hand at building the finest lookittg clock on the 
market Its satin finish anodtzed aluminum case looks great 
anyv^here. while stx 4" LEO digits provide a highly readable 
display Th^s is a corriplete kit no e^ctras needed and it on(y 
lakes 1-2 hours to assemble Votir choice ot case colors 
silver, gold, black (specilyj- 

Clock kit. 12 24 hour. DC-5 t24.95 

Clock with 10 mm. ID timer 12/24 hour. DC-10 $29.95 

Alarm clock. 12 hour only, DC-8 $29.95 

12V DC car clock. DC-7 129 95 

For wired and tested clocks add StO 00 to kit price 
SPECIFY t2 OR 24 HOUR FORMAT 




FM WJre1«tt MJke Kit 

■ransnrviis up to 300' to 
my FM tiraadcast ra- 
ifO. uses any type of 
nike Rurss on 3 to 9V 
las added sensitive rruhe prearnp 

M-1 kll 13.95 FM-2 Kit $4.9S 



Type FM-2 



Whisper Light KM 

An interesting kiL smail rrnke 
picks idp sounds and converts 
Them ro hght The louder the 
sound, the brighter the hght 
Includesi mike, controls up to 
300 W runs on 110 VAC 
Complete kit, WL-1 
£6.95 




Tone 0«CO<l«f 
A cDirrpiete tone deco^ 
der on a Single PC 
tooard Features 400- 
5000 Hj adjusiabfe 
range uia M turri pot. voltage regu- 
lation. 567 IC Uaetul for touch- 
tone burst delectron. FSK, etc 
Can also be used as a stable tone 
encoder Runs on ft to 13 wqlts. 
Complete Nit, TOi SS.^S 



Car Clock 

Ttw tiN-tCIT, only 5 ■atd«r c^nnactiont 



mifjill Clcn:*i mnvpmfint i^ compieT^ly AtffimbFmJ — you onry iD^dt^ 3 wif#* and ? 

caniroi pnoioc^M ~ a^iures you oi m highly reJidah-^e cf^spiay cfsy fi^r ii4t3M Cornell in a 
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172.95 



DC '3 kit t? hauf fotmal 
DC'9 wir^c^ anrj realed 



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Pfovt^des rne aasic parts anu PC 
^hc^fd re^uirfrd to provide a source 
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ncfuij« a rar>g# o^ pftrts for mott 
lifntng needs 

UT-5 Kit tS.i5 



Mad Blaster Kit 

Produces tOUD ear sTiatteriifvfi and 
atletition getimg siren it it sound 
Can Supply up lo IS watti ot 
Ot»nOkiOu$ «ud»o Pbai^tyi^iS VDC 



SJren Kit 
Prodyces upward and downward 
wai^ characteristic of a poltce 
siren. 5 W peak audio output runs 
on 3-15 volts uses ^-45 ohm 
speaker . 
Compile UvL SM-3 S2.95 



Cai«ndaf Alanii Ctocti 
The ClocK treats got il Jtlt 6 5 LED*. 
l2'2*r\Qut snooie 24 hour alarm 4 
year calendar battery baciiup and 
lotsi mo** Ttie super 700 T ctiip is 
used Sue 5k4]i2' .nches CompUrle 
kit tens case I not avai^iatitei 
DC'9 W4M 



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Under D««fi C*r Clock 

I jf- 7-4 h ou* >: ioc« > n jf t»4k! h f lh pi III ha; (.mm f*tnat*% 
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iLfPrr ''•SlPt£t4;n& Opt4A«i ai nw npf rinicwnilirc'i^i 

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HE 44.1^ inrrnmtf cvtf «fl udd ^1^ 00 »(if attvid u#M| 

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01 
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CMOS 




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01 i«v di^i JO 11 DC 
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*5 VdC inpLfl prgd -9 ydC (K' 3D mo 
+ 9 wdc prcKJucfi!* -ISydccSj^Smp. i1.35 



?5K M Turn Tnjti Poi lt,00 
1 K 20 Turn Trtm Pot f 50 



Cerafnlc IF F I Iters 

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It 



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Audio 
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Meike hiqhi resclution audio 
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PS-2 k*1 $2^.95 

PS-2 wired $3§ tS 




600 MHz 
PRESCALER 

Extend the range of your 
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150 Ttv sensitivity specify- 
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Wired, tested PS-IB $59.95 
KjI PS-IB S44.95 



30 Wsti 2 mir PWR AMP 

Simple Class C po*er amp features 8tifnes power gairt 1 Win 
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ir>cfedibie value, complete *i!h all parts, less case arK( T-R relay 
PA'1 , dO W pwr amp kit %22.B5 

TR-1. RF sensed T-R relay ki! 6.^5 



MRF'?3B tr an $151 or as used in PAi 

e-IOdbqa-in ISO mtij 111.95 



' Pi^Hcr Supply Kit 
Compieie mpie 



RF actuated relay senses RF 

[1 Wi and closes DPOT relay 

For RF sensed T-R relay 

TR-1 Kit $6.9S 



fef]iL>tBieit power 
supply proyjdes variable 6to18vonsat 
200 maand^SatlAmp £jiceflent load 
regtilalFon good Flllerinc] and smaN 

SljT'P Les^ Trdnsiarmirrs, r^tquires S 3 V 

r4 1 A and 24 VCT 

Complete kii. PS-3LT ifi.95 



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Small 1 dLznie1«f v thiek 
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Coax ConrHector 

Chassis mount 

3NC type II. DO 



25 AMP 
100V Bridge 
$1.50 each 

Mini-Bridge 60V 

1 Af^P 

2 tor $1.00 



Mmj RG'i74 CoaK 
10 n tor SI 00 



9 Von Bmntj Cnp« 

F^rtiE qiifl' ■\ S tor H 00 



J.%fz ttTcnQ^et #«C tJtO* ^i^4 #t«£tKi?n 
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- youf Choice E^ease specify 
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311 m»ch or 3^11 00 



OP^AMP Special 
Bt<f ET LF 1 374 1 - Drrect pin tor pm 74 1 compatitire, but 500 000 MEG 
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rSMG 
79MG 
723 
309iC 

7BIK 



f1^ 
f1.2S 
i.50 

fi.is 

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n#0ulaflOf9 



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7B15 

791? 

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11 00 
t1 00 
«1 2S 
St 2$ 
f1^ 



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Thnnh r& « Gtvmi tb' 



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Wni TO-92 H«al Sitrkt 
trwriti^itcrf firana % far 11.00 



Opto Isolators - 4N28 type 

Opio Refiectofs - Pt^oto diode * LED 



H 



$.50 
SI. 00 



Molai Pint 
Moh»!( airaady pracui in ttngr?^ 01 7 f^eftiei 
lor M pin lodiett 30 ■tripi Tor ti.00 



CDS PhoiDcvHt 
Rsmlince varies wrnh iighi 

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'See t/sl <Jif Advertisers on p^ge U4 



73 Magazine • JulyJ982 157 



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ISS 73 Magazine • July, 1982 



• SSB 
LINKS • REPEATERS 
flECEIVERS • PREAMPS 



TRANSMimSS QUALITY VHF/UHF KITS 



TRANScYlVERS •POWER SUPPLIES • PA'S AT AFFORDABLE PRICES 



FM-5 PC Board Kit-ONLY $159.95 

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SAVE A BUNDLE ON 
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HIGH QUALITY FM MODULES FOR 
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R76 VHF FM RECEIVER for 10M, 6M, 
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R450 UHF FM RECEIVER for 380-520 MHz 

bards. Kits in selectivity option 3 from $94.95 

R1 10 VHF AM RECEIVER Kit for vhf aircraft 
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COR KITS With audio mixer and speaker 
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CWID KITS 156 bits, field pfogrammabla 
clean audio. Only $59.95. 

A1 6 RF TIGHT BOX Deep drawn afum. case 
with tight cover and nosaams. 7x8x2 inches. 
Only $18.00. 

SCANNER CONVERTERS Copy 72-76, 
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bands on any scanner. Wired/tested On ty $79.95, 



TS1 VHF FM EXCITER for 10M, 6M. 2M, 
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T45t UHF FM EXCITER 2 to 3 Walts on 450 

ham band or adiacent Kits only $64.95, 

VHF & UHF LINEAR AMPLIFIERS. Use on 

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20 Models cover every practical rf and if range to 
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The ICF-S5W offers outstamilfng sensltivrty and 
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O 

s 



160 73 Magazine • July, 1982 




nniff 



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>ee Lisi of Advert fsers on pag& 1 14 



TOMagazine * July, 1982 161 




DEALER DIRECTORY 



Fboenix AZ 

The ^j<uthvveiit'!S miPt p^Clg^?^,v!Vl" ttntirnuiilcft' 
tiovA tuirapnny stwkins Keiiwmxl, Icfjm, 

Hy-Cain, liuHrcal, and imirv. Wciuld like to 
st-rvevcHil Pmwf Com munkolioix'i Corp.* 1640 
West Cgat^hmk Hd., Pboenii AZ !S50I5, 
S41 Watt 

Fontana CA 

Compkte liiMs JCOM. DenTron, T«fi-T«-, 
Mingi^ Cublc^ LuruT^ 0%vt 4000 ekik'tjuuk 
pfoducti Icir lifiibti:^^^ f*A«iHjnt cxpcft- 
■ iMMii w Also CB famo. Undmuibile. F«rimM 
&ett qpfci. 8iS8 Saim Av«,^ Fontan CA 
BS33S, 8SS-77tO. 



Son Diago CA 

We buy and Aidi Surplus Arniy Nav7 ¥l\ 
Ironies., iili«ci Termlmtted Miitt!rLu]. What do yoti 
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lo^v-n. [1K\. 444)-ltli Avenutf, PO Box 2ll4«, San 
Diu-guCAUei 12, 232-937©. 

Sail Jose CA 

Bay wttm^ ninh^t Amateur Hftdioittif». New- & 
ushJ Amateur Hadtosaks^ servtot^ We featuTE' 
^BUhtMl I COM, A^dsL. Yaeiu. Ten-Tec^ 
Samtee & many nKXC. Shavcnr EUdia^ Inc.* I37fi 
S<». BsinHrt A^-c. . ^n Jose CA 3SI28, gee-1103. 

Smyma GA 

Forymr K<mviTXxl, Yaeai, ICOM, Dnke and 
olliB' amatifur needs, axdr la ifitf ut. BffEMTt 
Two-^ av Hadio, 2906 N. AtUnU Bd.. Sm^-nui 
CA 30060* 43t-&aOR. 

Fieston ID 

Ross WB71JVZ has the Larj^isl Stuck oF Ama- 
teur Gear in thu," [nteimDuntalii WmX and the 
Best Priw^. Call mc for all vonr hjim needs, 
Eos Dblriliutinjg* TB S(». Slalc, Ptcrton ID 
83263. ?>52J)830: 

Terre Haute IN 

Youj luifn hiadquftttBT kicated i:n the heart cif 
the mixtvisl tlDo^er H c Ltniii ai. Inc*. ^ 
xMewknn^ Ccntef « P.O. Ben 330Q« Tcnc Haufe 
[N 47itt0. 33B-1456, 

Uttletcm MA 

Ttff ham iloTP of N.t. S'ou tan rrh on. Ken- 
wood, ICOM* WiLson, IeWu, tX-nf mn, fclAl 
ampK, B&W ^wilfhis & wuttme<Pfi. VVhL*itlef 
rftcuir du^tinHor^, llearc^t, He^'^rtcy^ uiiti'nii^ bv 
Uratn, WilH>n, iiuitler, GAM. TEl, COM 
[(ic, Ccimnuinit^tlcins & Elet^tiiHiic^t. 675 Crcal 
Rd.. Rt. 1 la, Ijlfltlon MA OUIiO. 4^6-3040. 



Phikdelphifl PA/ 
Camden N| 

WBvejpjldt; fit Coaxial Mlprowuvct Components 
fie lt:quipiin<!nt. Laboratory' Crude TeiA In- 
slmmf'n.Li, Power SuppUei, Buy. Sdl & Trade 
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Feny Avr,. Camdeii \J t)6l04, 541-4200, 

Amsterdam NY 
UPSTATE NEW YORK 

Kaiwood, lODM, Drake, plus mam- other 
liAo. AnkateurDeakrfaravis3Syw^- Adinxi- 
dadt nadk Stifipiv, Inc. * ISS W«rt Mvn Str^t^ 
Aiiideniam NT iklO. S42p8350. 

Syraciise-Rome-Uticfl NY 

rVo Luting: Ketisvood, Yd4^ti, ICOM, Drake, 
Ten-TiK, Swan, EtenTrtMi, Alpha, Bubt>t, MFJ. 
Temiw, A^ttion^ KLM^ Hy (ijtln, Mrdcy, I^r- 
st'n, Cn^ht'raft, Hustler, Mini Pn ducts. You 
won't Ijc disaijpotnt I'd with wjul|niwnt/seTV"tce- 
Radk) Worid. Oneida Coutth' Aiiport'Ttntli^ 
nal BiiiMJng. Ofukim NT 134£4« 337-41203. 



Coluinbiis OH 

Tiitf biifga^ aAd bst Ham iiUnr in the inJdwal 
(eiturinfE qualitj- Keni*txjd products witti 
working dj^La^T. Wf t«tt only the best. 
AuthuriicK^ Kenwcmd Scwxitx. Univeraal 
Amalmtr Radio Inc.^ t2S0 AkLa Dr. . Retmolds- 
burg (ColiHiibus^ OH 430(»i. Wm^^l.' 



Bend OR 

SfltGllltt^ TV. Known brands. Cul] today for 
mun^ hiformation and inquire nbtJut [Jiir dealer 
pm|yai5i, WESPEHCOM, P.O. Rod 7226, 
Bend on »nD3. 389-4)996. 



Scran ton PA 

lOOM, Btrd^ Cmhcr^, BedcmaaK Fluloe. 
LanBi» Hitftkr, Alctienju Speciiiliiisiv A^tnm, 
.Avaflti. Belden, \I^2AU \V2VS. CDE, AEA* 
\tbrtijilcs, Ham-K<;>, CES. AflipSvni^ Som* 
Fanon/Courkr, fi&W. Ameco. Shune. LaRue 
D e c tP C f u cA. 1L12 Crandview St.* Scrsntoa PA 
i&308, 343-2124. 



Ann Arbor Ml 

See \& hn pruduDis. like Ten-Tec. K- L. Drske, 
DenTiwi and maj:i\' mon?. Open Moodav 
tiaouA Saturdav. ^3830 in 17X. ^^VCB', 
VI'BSUXO, UTOOKN uM WERP behind the 
counter . IWthade Radio SuppK', 327 E^ Hoovh- 
A^y.« Aim Aitwf MI -iSl^t «^S-M0B. 



Hudson NH 

New Engjknd'^ Dtsbributor and .Authoriand. Ser- 
vie? Center for all Major AmatetLt Line. Tufts 
Radin FJrctTonkTt. Tnc.. Bl Lowcl) Road, Ktid- 



Somerset NJ 

New |c.'ni4iy\ utily fnctory^-fluthuriajd ICOM 
fljid yAmSU dbitri tutor, I^rj^e imttiilory of new 
and used j!,]:Kvlabv. Most Tnajur bmnd^ in stock. 
Com pie If service afld lai' ill ties. RadtOf 
Unllmilcd, 1700 Easton Avenue* P,0. Ba?i347* 
Somer^t S) 08873. 4^-45dy. 

Buffalo NY 
WESTERN NEW YORK 

Niafl^m Frontier't cxdy fuD stocMng AinatEur 
deaiet. Ako Shotwa^'e, CB, Scamwtv MaTtne, 
CkHmnerda], Operatinjt display? featuritig 
KfHwnood and otbeis. Towen. Anteoiuis^ Sales 
and Sm^iw. D% Cgwimujiira tjatm, 3&14 Twmtt- 
sjt aoul. Wm Ssieca S)t\ G3&^M73, 



Dallas TX 

Deial<?r in Used Computer Kurdwarc & EloC' 
litxiif Parts. Special on Diiiiiy Wliiecl Frinton. 
XeroH Woid PTOcessiiigEquipjntjnt, Dual Card 
Pnntcr<h iiiwl Di^pby S;y'stt*ni.*;. Catalog $1,(1(1^ 
Rondun Ccnnpanv fThe Oiniputer Hoom) 
Drpt. 73. 2522 RuUiir St., l>alLaa TX 75i£3.<), 
630-4fi21 

San Anionio TX 

Ama(«Hi?, ConnnBiul 2-ia>- SdOing Antexkiu 
S|)(n:iafiits, Avanti^ A^xkii, Riid, Hv-Caio, 
Standaid* VitHupist^ Midland, Hciif>v Cu^ 
cndt. Dkkctnc Bustfar, ICOM« MFI. N>t. 
^urr, Cubit, Tempo. Ten-Tec and olbm- Ap- 
IiUancv & Equipment Qi.. Inc. 2317 Vainx 
JackMtfi Road, San Antonio TX 78213, 
93S-3350. 

Vienna VA 

Thi? Wu.shington metropfjliljin urea's leadirtjj 
supplitT nl the latest In Aiiniiitrur Htidiu and 'Visit 
E^^uipment, On your next trip to the Nation's 
Capital. !<i:ap b}' and see us. Eiectnaik Equip- 
ment Eai^i. Inc., 516 Mill St. !S.£.* Vioma VA 



Syracuse^Central NY 

HAM HON K FtAj:>lO SAVES US tX)TOF 
on ail Iwinip TtTi-Tw, Hy<iain ^ Kanironies 
Gear. Fast, [X'^iendable Stnioe lk.-foa" fit .\fter 
the Salel Servks [& Our Main Bmints5.1 Need 
Cash — Hain-IkiTke will sdl yoiir (|eai for 10^ 
CDmmisdnn. 3S06 Erie Blvd. E.. Sytanne NY 
13214, 446-3366, 



DEALERS 

Your companif name aiid message 
can contain up to 25 words for as lit- 
tle as $150 yearly (prepaid), or $15 
per month (prepaid quarterly). No 
mention of mail-order business or 
area ctnie permitted. Directory text 
arid payment must reach us GO days 
in advance of publication. Forei^am- 
pk\ advertimngfor the Sept. '82 issue 
must be in our hands by Juhy 1st. 
Ma^ ta 73 Magazine, Peterborou^ 
NH 03458. ATTN: Nancy Cmrnpa. 



PROPAGATION 



J. H. Nelson 
4 Plymouth Dr 
Whiting NJ 08759 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO 



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A = Next higher frequency may also be useful 
B = Difficult circuit this period. 

First letter s: night waves. Second = day waves. 

G = Goodt F = Fair, P = Poor. *= Chance of solar flare&. 

# = Chance of aurora. 

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162 73 Magazine • Jury, 1982 



Fleatier Sen/ce tor facing pag» ^83- 



New Yaesu FT- 102 Series 

Transceiver of Champions! 




The tong-awafted new generation of Yaesu HF technology has arrived I New research in 
improved receiver fittering and spectral purity is brought to bear In the competition-bred 
FT-102f the HF transceiver designed for active Amateurs on today *s intensely active bandsl 



lique Cascaded Fffter System 

« FT-102 utilizes a^ advanced 8.2 MHz and 455 kHz IF system, capable of 
:^ting as many as three fillers In cascade. Optional fifters ol 2.9 kHzJ.8 
7, 600 Hz, and 300 Hz may be combined with the two stock 2.9 kHz filters for 
crating flexibility youVe nevef seen in an HF trafisceiver before nowf 
New Receiver Front End 

lizing husky junction ti eld-effect tmnsistors in a 24 voK, high-current design, 
1 FT-102 front end features a iow*d(stort)on RF preampftfier that may be by- 
^ised via a front panel switch when not needed. 
Notch and Audio Peak Filler 

lighly effective 455 kHz IF Notch Fffter provides supert rejection of hetero- 
ses, carriei^, and ott^er annoying mterference appearing within the IF pass- 
ed. On CW, the Audio Peak Filter may be switched in during extremely tight 
-up conditions for post-detection signal enhancement 
riabie IF Bandwidth with iF Shift 

! F- 102 "s double conversion receiver features Yaesu *s time -proven Variable 
idwidth System, which utilizes the cascaded IF filters to provide intermediate 
idwidths such as 2,1 kHz, 1 ,5 kHz, or dOO Hz simply by twisting a dial. The 
iable Bandwidth System is used in conjunction with the IF Shift control, 
ch allows the operator to center the IF passband frequency response without 
ying the incoming signal pitch, 

ie/Narrow Filter Selection 

sending on the exact combination of optional filters you choose, a variety of 
'e/narrow operating modes may be selected. For example, you may set up 
kHz in SSB/WIDE. 1 J kHz In SSB/NARROW, then select 1 .8 kHz for CW/ 
5E, and 600 Hz or 300 Hz for CW/NARROW. Or use the Variable Bandwidtii 
set your SSB bandwidth, and use 600 Hz for CW/WIDE and 300 Hz for 
/NARROW! No Other manufacturer gives you so much flextbiirty in selecting 
r responses! 

iable Pula« Width Nofee Blanker 

lion noise, tfit "Woodpecker." and power line noise are modem-day ene- 
s of effective Amateur operation. The FT- 102 Noise Blanker offers improved 
Iking action on today's man-made noise sources {ttiough no blanker can 
linate ail forms of band noise) (or more solid copy under adverse conditions. 

i Distortion Audio/ J F Stage Design 

r that dynamic range, stability, and AGC problems have been largely efimi- 
id thanks to improved technology. Yaesu s engineers have put particulaf 
ition on maximizing intelligence recovery In the receiver. Wliile elementary 
r cascading schemes often degrade performance, the FT-102's unique blerid 
rystal and ceramic IF filters plus audio tone control provides very low phase 
y, reduced passband ripple, and hence increased recovery of information. 



Heavy Duty Thre#-Tube Final Amplifier 

The FT*102 final ampMler uses ttiree 6146B tubes ^r imm constetenl power 
output and improved reliability. Using up to 10 dB of RF negaive feedback, the 
FT-102 transmitter ihird-order distortion products are ripicajly 40 dfl down, 
giving you a studio quality output signal 

Dual Metering Syetam 

Adopted from the new FT-ONE transceiver, the Ouaf Metenng System provides 
simultaneous display of ALC voltage on one meter along with metering of plate 
voltage, cathode current, relative power output, or clipping Jevel on the other. 
This system greatly simplifies proper adjustment of the transmitter* 

MIcroDhor^e Amplifier Tone Control 

Recognizing the differences in voice ctiaracterlstics of Amateur operators, 
Yaesu 's engineers have incorporated an ingenious microphone amplifier tone 
control circuit, which allows you to tailor the treble and bass response of the 
Fr-102 transmitter for best fidelity on your speech pattern. 

RF Speech Proceseor 

The built-in RF Speech Processor uses true RF clipping, for improved talk power 
under difficult conditions- The clipping type speech processor provides cleaner, 
more affective "puneti'' for your signal than simpler cIrculU used in other 
transmitters. 

VOX with Front Panel Controfe 

The FT-102 standard package includes VOX for hands-free operation. Both the 
VOX Gain and VOX Delay controls are located on the front panel, for maximum 
operator convenience, 

IF Monitor Circuit 

For easy adjustment of the RF Speech Processor or for recording both sides of a 
conversation, an IF monitor circuit is provided in the transmiter section. When 
the optional AM/FM unit is installed, Itie IF monitor may be used for proper 
setting of the FM deviation and AM mic gain. 

WARC B8f>d9 Factory Installed 

The FT*102 is factory equipped for operation on all present and proposed 
Amateur bands, so you won't liave to worry about retrofrtling capability on your 
transceiver. An extra AUX band position is avajEabie on ttte bandsw^tch for 
special applications. 



Full Line Of 

For maximum operating flexibility, see your Auttiorized Dealer for details of the 
complete line of FT-102 accessories. Coming soon are the FV-1020M 
Synthesized VFO. SP-102 Speaker/ Audio Filter, a full line of optional filters and 
microphones, and ttie AM/FM Unit, 



Price And Speciftcallons Subject To 
Change Without Notice Of Obf>gatton 




W 



The radio. 



T«fW 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP., 6851 Walthall Way, Paramount, CA 90723 • (213) 633-4007 
YAESU Eastern Service Ctr., 9812 Princeton-Glendale Rd.» Cincinnati, OH 45246 • (513) 674-3100 




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Superior dynamic range, auto, antenna tuner, 
QSK, dual NB, 2 VFO's, general coverage receiver. 





The TS'930S is a superlative p high per- 
formance, ail-solid state p HF transceiver 
keyed to the exacting requirements of the 
DX and contest operator. It covers all 
Amateur bands from 160 through 10 
meters, and incorporates a 150 kHz to 
30 MHz general coverage receiver having 
an excellent dynajnlc range. 
Among Hs otber important feat ores uc, 
S8B slope tuntingt CW VBT» IF notch fiiter* 
CW pitch control, dual digital VFO^s. CW 
full break-in* automatic antenna tuner, 
and a higher voltage operated solid state 
final amplifier. It Is available with or 
without the AT-930 automatic antenna 
toner built-in* 
TS-930S FEATUKES; 

* 160-10 Meters, with 150 kHz * 30 MHz 
general coverage receiver. 

Covers all Amateur frequencies from 160-10 
meters, including new WARC. 30, 17. and 
12 meter bands, on SSB. CW. FSK. and AM. 
Features 150 kHz - 30 MHz general cover- 
age receiver. Separate Amateur band 
access keys allow speedy band selection. 
UP/DOWN bandswitch changes tn 1-MHz 
steps. A new. innovative, quadruple con- 
version, digital FLL synthesized circuit 
provides superior frequency accuracy and 
stabllit\^ plus greatly enhanced selecUvity. 

* Excellent receiver dynamic range. 
Receiver two- tone dvnamic range* 100 dB 
typical t20 meters. 5'00 Hz CW bandwidth. 
at senslUvity of 0.25 iiv, S/N 10 dB), 
provides the ultimate In rejection of 

IM distortion. 

* All solid state, 2S volt operated 
final amplifier. 

The final amplifier operates on 28 VDC for 
lowest IM distortion. Power Input rated at 
250 W on SSB. CW, and FSK. and al 
80 W on AM. Final amplifier protection 
circuit with cooling fan, SWR/Power 
meter built-in. 

* Automatic antenna tuner, built -Inn. 
Available with AT-930 antenna tuner built- 
in* or as an option. Covers Amateur bands 
80-10 meters, including the new WARC 
bands. Tuning range automatically 



pre- selected with band selection to mini- 
mize tunins* time, "AUTO-THRU^ switch on 
front panet 

* CW fnii break in. 

CW full break-in circuit uses CMOS Io0c 10 
plus reed relay for maximum flexiblhty. 
coupled wllh smooth, quiet operation. 
Switchable to semi -break-in. 

• Dual digital VFO's. 

10-Hz step dual digital VFO's Include band 
information. Each VFO tunes continuously 
from band lo band. A large, heavy, ilywheel 



* Fluorescent tube digital display. 

Fluorescent tube digital display has ana!- 
type sub-scale wnili"20-kH?. steps. Separp 
2 digit display indicates KIT frequency si 
' RF speech processor. 

RF clipper t^^pe processor provides higjie 
avera^ 'talk-powerr plus improved inte 
gfbfUty. Separate "IN' and ^OUT" front 
panel level controls. 
' One year warranty. 
The TS-930S carries a one year limited 
warranty on parts and labor. 



type knob is used for improved tuning ease, other features: 



T,F, Set switch allows fast transmit 
frequency setting for split-frequency opera- 
tions. A— B swltcn for equalizing one VFO 
frequency to the other VFO ''Lock'' switch 
provided'. HIT control for ±9.9 kHz receive 
frequency shift. 

* Eight memory channels. 

Stores both frequency and band informa- 
tion. VFO-MEMO switch allows use of each 
memory as an independent VFO. (tlie 
original memorv'^ frequency can be recalled 
at Willi, or as a tlxed frequency. Internal 
Battery memory bark-up- estiinated 1 year 
life. (Batteries not Kenwood supplied). 

* Dual mode noise blanker [*'pislsc'* 
or '^woodpecker-). 

NB-1. with threshold control for pulse -typt* 
noise. NB'2 for longer duration 
"woodpecker" t>'pe noise. 

' 55B IF slope tuning. 

Allows independent adjustment of the low 
and/ or high frequency slopes of the IF 
passband. for best Interference rejection. 
' CW VBT and pitch controls. 
CW VB'r (Variable Band\^idth TuninjE*) 
control tunes out interierin^ signals. "CW 
pitch controls shifts IF passTjand and simul 
taneously changes the pitch of tlie beat 
frequency, A "Narrow/ Wide" filler 
selector switch is provided. 

* IF notch filter. 

lOO-kHz IF notch circuit gives deep, 
sharp, notch, better than -40 dB. 

* Audio filter built-in. 
Tuneable, peak-type audio filter forCW. 

* AC power supply built-in* 
120. 220, or 240 VAC. switch selected 
(operates on AC only)- 



• SSB monitor circuit, 3 step RF attenuate 
VOX, and lOO-kHz marker. 

Optional accessoriea: 

• AT-930 automatic antenna tuner 

• SP-930 external speaker with selectable 
audio rilters. 

• YG'455C-1 (500 Hz) or YG-455CN-1 (250 
plug-m CW niters for 455-kiiz IF 

• YK-88C 1 (500 Hz) CW plug in (liter for 
8.83-MHz IF, 

• YK 88A 1 (6 kHz! AM plug-in Illter for 
8.83^MHz IF. 

• MC-60 (S-8) deluxe desk microphone wi 
UP/DO\VTV switch. 

• TL-922A linear amplifter. 

• SM'220 station monitor. 

• HC-IO digital world clock. 

■ HS^, HS-5, HS'4 headphones. 

More Information on the TS-930S is 
available from all authorized dealers of 
Trio-Kenwood Communications 
nil West Walnut Street. 
Compton, California 90220 

^KEN\A/qOC 

■^ . , . puce^etttr in amateur radio 




Speciflcatioris^ and prtcez 

siitiect tJi change without moUce or oblige